9780071451451

Miller's Guide to Foundations and Sitework

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780071451451

  • ISBN10:

    0071451455

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2005-07-08
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping Icon Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • eCampus.com Logo Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $27.00 Save up to $6.75
  • Buy Used
    $20.25

    USUALLY SHIPS IN 2-4 BUSINESS DAYS

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

Written by two of the co-authors of McGraw-Hill's popular Carpentry & Construction, Fourth Edition, this dollar-saving series is great for do-it-yourselfers, weekend repairmen and homeowners, as well as seasoned pros who want to stay on top of the latest methods, materials, equipment, and code requirements. Organized according to the actual stages of construction, these titles offer in-depth, expert-level coverage of everything needed to plan, manage, and complete a job. Both are heavily illustrated and contain valuable tip-boxes throughout. Latest information on Insulated Concrete Forms Clearing, leveling, and excavating Preparing and laying the foundation Concrete mixing Pouring concrete slabs and floors Site improvements

Author Biography

Mark R. Miller (Kingsville, TX) Chairman and Associate Professor of Industrial Technology at Texas A&M University in Kingsville, Texas. He teaches construction courses for future middle managers in the trade. Co-author of several technical books including McGraw-Hill’s best selling Carpentry & Construction 3/e.

Rex Miller (Round Rock, TX) is Professor Emeritus of Industrial Technology at State University College at Buffalo, and has taught technical curriculums at the college level for more than 40 years. He is the co-author of McGraw-Hill’s best-selling Carpentry & Construction 3/e, and the author of more than 75 texts for vocation and industrial arts programs.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Acknowledgments x
Introduction xi
Starting the Job
Safety
2(3)
Other Safety Measures
2(1)
General Safety Rules
3(1)
Safety on the Job
3(1)
Safety Hazards
4(1)
Using Carpenter Tools
5(13)
Measuring Tools
5(1)
Saws
6(1)
Hammers and Other Small Tools
6(4)
Squares
10(3)
Power Tools
13(5)
Following Correct Sequences
18(8)
Preparing the Site
18(3)
The Basement
21(1)
The Floor
22(1)
Wall Frames
22(1)
Sheathing
22(1)
Roofing
22(1)
Siding
23(1)
Finishing
23(1)
The Laser Level
23(3)
Preparing the Site
Basic Sequence
26(1)
Locating the Building on the Site
26(3)
Property Boundaries
26(1)
Laying Out the Foundation
27(2)
The Builder's Level
29(6)
How Does It Work?
29(1)
Preparing the Instrument
30(2)
The Level-Transit
32(1)
Using the Level and Level-Transit
32(2)
Establishing Elevations
34(1)
Using the Leveling Rod
34(1)
Preparing the Site
35(1)
Clearing
35(1)
Excavation
35(1)
Providing Access During Construction
36(6)
Materials Storage
36(2)
Temporary Utilities
38(1)
Waste Disposal
38(1)
Arranging Delivery Routes
38(4)
Laying Footings & Foundations
Introduction
42(1)
Sequence
43(1)
Laying Out the Footings
43(2)
Soil Strength
43(1)
Footing Width
44(1)
Locating Footing Depth
44(1)
Footings under Columns
44(1)
Special Strength Needs
45(1)
Reinforcement and Strength
45(1)
Excavating the Footings
45(2)
Finding Trench Depth
45(1)
Excavating for Deep Footings
46(1)
Excavating for Shallow Footings
46(1)
Slab Footings and Basements
47(1)
Building the Forms for the Footings
47(2)
Laying Out the Forms
47(1)
Nails
48(1)
Putting Up the Forms
48(1)
Working with Concrete
49(5)
Reinforcement
49(1)
Specifying Concrete
49(1)
Setting Time
50(1)
Estimating Concrete Needs
51(1)
Pouring the Concrete
51(1)
Strength of the Concrete
52(1)
Slump Test
52(1)
Effects of Temperature
53(1)
Curing of the Concrete
54(1)
Using Portland Cement Concrete Safely
54(1)
Building the Foundation Forms
54(7)
Making the Forms
54(1)
Joining the Forms
54(1)
Spreaders
55(1)
Using Panel Forms
55(1)
One-Piece Forms
56(1)
Special Forms
57(1)
Openings and Special Shapes
57(2)
Reinforcing Concrete Foundations
59(1)
Estimating Concrete Volume
60(1)
Delivery and Pouring
60(1)
Finishing the Concrete
60(1)
Concrete Block Walls
61(1)
Plywood Foundations
61(1)
Drainage and Waterproofing
62(1)
Waterproofing Basement Walls
63(1)
Basement Wall Coatings
63(2)
Gray Wall
65(1)
Termites
65(3)
Types of Termites
66(1)
Termite Protection
67(1)
Termites and Treated Wood
68(1)
Pressure-Treated Wood
68(4)
Preservatives
69(1)
Aboveground and In-Ground Treatment
69(1)
Nails and Fasteners
70(1)
Handling and Storing Treated Wood
70(2)
Pouring Concrete Slabs & Floors
Concrete Slabs
72(10)
Sequence for Preparing a Slab
72(1)
Types of Slabs
73(1)
Excavate
73(1)
Construct the Forms
74(1)
Prepare the Subsurface
75(2)
Special Shapes
77(1)
Pouring the Slab
78(3)
Expansion and Contraction
81(1)
Joints
81(1)
Concrete Floors
82(1)
Stairs
82(1)
Sidewalks and Driveways
83(1)
Sidewalks
83(1)
Driveways
83(1)
Special Finishes and Surfaces
84(2)
Different Surface Textures
84(2)
Energy Factors
86(2)
Building Floor Frames
Introduction
88(1)
Sequence
88(1)
Sill Placement
88(3)
Anchor the Sill
89(2)
Setting Girders
91(1)
Joists
91(7)
Lay Out the Joists
91(4)
Cut Joists
95(1)
Other Ways to Cut Joists
95(1)
Setting the Joists
96(1)
Fire-Stops
97(1)
Bridging
98(1)
Subfloors
98(4)
Plywood Subfloor
99(1)
Chipboard and Fiberboard
99(1)
Laying Sheets
99(2)
Board Subflooring
101(1)
Special Joists
102(2)
Overhangs
102(1)
Sunken Floors
102(2)
Low Profiles
104(1)
Energy Factors
104(6)
Moisture Barriers
105(1)
Energy Plenums
106(4)
Private Sewage Facilities
Septic Tanks and Disposal Fields
110(1)
Septic Tank Operation
110(2)
Septic Tank Location
112(1)
Septic Tank Disposal Field
112(1)
The Grease Trap
113(1)
Newer Wastewater Treatments
114(6)
Private Water Systems
Public Water Supplies
120(1)
Private Water Systems
120(1)
Drilling a Well, Boring a Well, or Driving a Well
120(1)
Drinking Water
121(1)
Well Water
121(1)
Water Pressure
122(1)
Pressure Tanks
122(1)
Operation of the Pressure Tank
123(1)
Pressure Switch
124(1)
Relief Valve (Pressure)
124(1)
Pump Installation
124(2)
Test Run
126(1)
Pressure Tank Installation
126(1)
Water Conditioning Equipment
126(1)
Locating the Equipment
127(1)
Definitions
128(2)
Designing and Planning for Solar Heating
Passive Solar Heating
130(4)
Indirect Gain
130(2)
Direct Gain
132(1)
Isolated Gain
132(1)
Time Lag Heating
133(1)
Underground Heating
133(1)
Passive Cooling Systems
134(1)
Natural Ventilation
134(1)
Induced Ventilation
134(1)
Desiccant Cooling
134(1)
Evaporative Cooling
134(1)
Night Sky Radiation Cooling
134(1)
Time Lag Cooling
134(1)
Underground Cooling
134(1)
Active Solar Heating Systems
135(5)
Operation of Solar Heating Systems
135(1)
Domestic Water Heating System
135(1)
Indirect Heating/Circulating Systems
136(2)
Air Transfer
138(1)
Cycle Operation
138(1)
Designing the Domestic Water Heating System
139(1)
Other Components
140(1)
Is This for Me?
140(1)
Building Modifications
141(2)
Building Underground
143(5)
Advantages
143(5)
Alternative Types of Foundations
Insulated Concrete Forms
148(9)
Advantages and Disadvantages to Insulated Concrete Forms
148(1)
Tools Used in Insulated Concrete Form Framing
149(1)
Sequence
149(2)
Types of Foam
151(1)
Three Types of ICF Systems
151(3)
Foam Working Tools
154(1)
Gluing and Tying Units
154(1)
Pouring Concrete
154(3)
Concrete Block
157(4)
The Permanent Wood Foundation System
161(5)
Panel Foundations
163(1)
Building Materials
163(2)
Energy Considerations
165(1)
Finishing
165(1)
Adding Living Space
165(1)
Remodeling
165(1)
Flexibility
166(1)
Pressure-Treated Wood Concerns and Considerations
166(2)
Types of Wood Preservative
168(2)
Constructing the Permanent Wood Foundation
170(1)
Radon Gas
170(1)
Advantages of the PWF
170(18)
Flexibility
170(1)
Scheduling
170(1)
Further Advantages of the PWF
171(1)
Soil Conditions
171(1)
Site Preparation
172(1)
Footings and Backfill
173(1)
Site Drainage
173(3)
Building the PWF Step-by-Step
176(1)
Finishing the PWF House
176(12)
Appendices
A. Concrete Blocks and/or Concrete Masonry Units
188(2)
Grades of Concrete Masonry Units
188(1)
Types of Concrete Masonry Units
188(1)
Concrete Brick
188(1)
Concrete Masonry Units
188(2)
Water-Cement Ratio
190(1)
Steel Reinforcement
190(1)
B. Things to Know About Bricks
190(3)
Bricks
190(1)
Types of Brick
191(1)
Grades of Brick
192(1)
C. Welded Wire Fabric Reinforcement for Concrete
193(1)
D. Specialty Plywood Panels
194(1)
E. English to Metric Conversions
195(14)
Glossary
Index 209

Rewards Program

Reviews for Miller's Guide to Foundations and Sitework (9780071451451)