9780240803081

Modern Recording Techniques

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780240803081

  • ISBN10:

    0240803086

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1995-06-01
  • Publisher: Focal Pr

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Summary

As the most up-to-date, authoritative recording guide available, Modern Recording Techniques addresses the new but rapidly growing market of project studio recording, the new base of home music production using multitrack, hard-disk, and MIDI technologies. Perfect for anyone wanting to learn professional recording, this updated, easy-to-understand edition provides all you need to fully understand the tolls and day-to-day practices of music recording and production. David Miles Huber is widely acclaimed in the recording industry as a digital audio consultant, author, engineer, and guest lecturer. He received is degree in recording techniques (I.M.P.) from Indiana University and also studied in the Tonmeister program at the University of Surrey in Guildford, Surrey, England. Robert E. Runstein has been associated with all aspects of the recording industry, working as a performer, sound mixer, electronics technician, A&R specialist, and record producer. He also served as chief engineer and technical director of a recording studio. He has taught several courses in modern recording techniques, for which much of the material in this book was originally prepared. Mr. Runstein is a member of the Audio Engineering Society. Provide in-depth insights into hands-on operation of studio recording equipment, such as project studio. Explores the latest in digital technology, multitrack systems, MIDI, and the electronic musical instrument industry. Perfect for anyone wanting to learn professional recording - producers, musicians, multimedia developers, audio for video professionals, universities, schools, and audio enthusiasts

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments xii
Introduction
1(22)
The Recording Studio
2(8)
The Control Room
5(2)
Recording Studio Marketing Techniques
7(3)
The Recording Process
10(4)
Multitrack Recording
10(2)
Real-Time Performance Recording: A Different Animal
12(2)
The Project Studio
14(1)
Audio-for-Visual Production and Postproduction
15(1)
Multimedia
16(1)
The People Who Make It All Happen
16(3)
The Artist
17(1)
Studio Musicians
17(1)
The Producer
18(1)
The Engineer
18(1)
Assistant Engineer
18(1)
Maintenance Engineer
19(1)
Studio Management
19(1)
Women in the Industry
19(1)
The Transducer
19(4)
Sound and Hearing
23(36)
Sound-Pressure Waves
23(2)
Waveform Characteristics
25(15)
Amplitude
25(1)
Frequency
26(1)
Velocity
27(1)
Wavelength
27(2)
Reflection of Sound
29(1)
Diffraction of Sound
29(1)
Frequency Response
30(1)
Phase
31(3)
Harmonic Content
34(6)
Acoustic Envelope
40(1)
Loudness Levels: The dB
41(5)
The Ear
46(3)
Threshold of Hearing
47(1)
Threshold of Feeling
47(1)
Threshold of Pain
48(1)
Auditory Perception
49(10)
Beats
51(1)
Combination Tones
51(1)
Masking
51(1)
Perception of Direction
52(3)
Perception of Space
55(4)
Studio Acoustics and Design
59(36)
The Project Studio
60(1)
The Music Studio
61(2)
The Audio-for-Visual Production Environment
63(2)
Primary Factors Governing Studio and Control Room Acoustics
65(30)
Acoustic Isolation
65(11)
Frequency Balance
76(15)
Reverberation
91(4)
Microphones: Design and Application
95(64)
The Microphone Pickup: An Introduction
95(1)
Microphone Design
96(6)
The Dynamic Microphone
96(1)
The Condenser Microphone
97(5)
Microphone Characteristics
102(11)
Directional Response
102(5)
Frequency Response
107(2)
Transient Response
109(1)
Output Characteristics
109(4)
Microphone Techniques
113(11)
Pickup Characteristics as a Function of Working Distance
113(8)
Stereo Miking Techniques
121(2)
Recording Direct
123(1)
Microphone Placement Techniques
124(24)
Brass Instruments
125(2)
Guitar
127(3)
Keyboard Instruments
130(4)
Percussion
134(7)
Stringed Instruments
141(2)
Voice
143(1)
Woodwind Instruments
144(4)
Microphone Selection
148(11)
Shure SM-57
148(2)
Sennheiser MD 504
150(1)
AKG D112
150(1)
Beyer M-160
151(2)
AKG C3000
153(1)
AKG C414B/TL II
154(1)
Audio-Technica AT4050-CM5
155(1)
Neumann TLM 193
156(1)
Microtech Gefell UM92.1S
157(2)
The Analog Audio Tape Recorder
159(30)
Magnetic Recording Media
159(2)
The Tape Transport
161(7)
Capstan Motors
163(1)
Tape Transport Systems
164(1)
The Magnetic Tape Head
165(3)
The Professional Analog ATR
168(21)
Equalization
172(1)
Bias Current
172(1)
Recording Channels
173(2)
The Remote Control Unit and Autolocator
175(1)
MIDI Machine Control
176(1)
Tape and Head Configurations
177(2)
Print-Through
179(1)
Cleanliness
180(1)
Degaussing
180(1)
Head Alignment
180(2)
Electronic Calibration
182(7)
Digital Audio Technology
189(62)
The Basics of Digital Audio
190(13)
Sampling
190(4)
Quantization
194(2)
The Digital Recording/Reproduction Process
196(2)
Digital Transmission
198(5)
Fixed-Head and Rotating-Head Digital Audio Recorders
203(15)
The Fixed-Head Digital Audio Recorder
203(6)
The Rotating-Head Digital Audio Recorder
209(3)
Modular Digital Multitrack Systems (MDMs)
212(6)
Digital Audio Sampling Systems
218(30)
Samplers
218(8)
Hard-Disk Recording
226(22)
Triggered Event Digital Audio
248(3)
MIDI and Electronic Musical Instrument Technology
251(30)
What Is MIDI?
252(1)
System Interconnection
253(1)
MIDI In, Out, and Thru Ports
253(1)
The Daisy Chain
254(1)
MIDI Channels
254(1)
The MIDI Message
255(5)
Channel Messages
256(3)
System Messages
259(1)
Electronic Musical Instruments
260(7)
Keyboard Instruments
261(4)
Percussion
265(2)
Sequencers
267(9)
Hardware-Based Sequencers
268(1)
Computer-Based Sequencers
269(7)
Mixing in the MIDI Environment
276(5)
Mixing through MIDI
276(2)
Hardware MIDI Controllers
278(1)
MIDI Implementation in Mixers and Consoles
279(2)
Synchronization
281(26)
Synchronization between Analog Transports
282(7)
Time Code
282(7)
Synchronization Using Time Code
289(2)
Production Setup for Using Time Code
291(1)
Distribution of LTC Signal Lines
291(1)
Time Code Levels
291(1)
Synchronization within Electronic Music Production
292(9)
Non-MIDI Synchronization
292(1)
MIDI-Based Synchronization
293(8)
Digital Audio Synchronization
301(6)
The Need for Stable Timing Reference
301(1)
Synchronization Methods
302(3)
Proprietary Synchronization Methods for Modular Digital Multitrack Recorders
305(1)
Pull-Down Sample Rates
305(2)
Amplifiers
307(10)
Amplification
307(2)
The Operational Amplifier
309(8)
The Preamplifier
311(1)
Equalizers
311(1)
Summing Amplifiers
312(1)
Distribution Amplifiers
313(1)
Isolation Amplifiers
313(1)
Impedance Amplifiers
314(1)
Power Amplifiers
314(1)
Voltage-Controlled Amplifiers
315(1)
Digitally-Controlled Amplifiers
316(1)
The Audio Production Console
317(32)
Recording
318(3)
Monitoring
320(1)
Overdubbing
321(1)
Mixdown
321(1)
The Professional Analog Console
322(15)
Channel Input
324(2)
Equalization
326(1)
Inser Point
327(1)
Auxiliary Send Section
327(2)
Dynamics Section
329(1)
Monitor Section
329(3)
Channel Assignment
332(1)
Output Fader
333(1)
Output Bus
334(1)
Patch Bay
334(2)
Metering
336(1)
Digital Console Technology
337(4)
Digitally Conrolled Analog Consoles
337(2)
Fully Digital Consoles
339(2)
Console Automation
341(8)
Scanning
341(2)
Voltage-Controlled Automation
343(5)
Automated Servo-Driven Fader
348(1)
MIDI-Based Automation
348(1)
Signal Processors
349(42)
Equalization
350(4)
Peaking Filters
352(1)
Shelving Filters
353(1)
High-Pass and Low-Pass Filters
353(1)
Equalizer Types
354(3)
Applying Equalization
357(2)
Dynamic Range Control
359(8)
Metering
359(2)
Dynamic Range Processors
361(1)
Compression
362(2)
Limiting
364(1)
Expansion
365(2)
Applying Dynamic Range Control
367(1)
Digital Signal Processing
368(18)
Real-Time and Non-Real-Time DSP
369(1)
DSP Basics
369(6)
The Real World of DSP Design
375(1)
Delay
376(2)
Reverberation
378(2)
Pitch-and Time-Shift-Related Effects
380(2)
Psychoacoustic Enhancement
382(4)
Dynamic Effects Editing Using MIDI
386(5)
Noise Reduction
391(12)
The Compansion Process
392(6)
The Dolby Noise-Reduction System
393(3)
The dbx Noise-Reduction System
396(2)
Single-Ended Noise-Reduction Process
398(1)
Noise Gates
399(1)
Digital Noise Reduction
399(4)
Visual Analysis
400(1)
De-Clicking
401(1)
De-Noising
401(2)
Monitor Speakers
403(16)
Speaker and Room Considerations
404(15)
Speaker Design
405(1)
Crossover Networks
406(3)
Speaker Polarity
409(1)
Monitoring
410(9)
Product Manufacture
419(24)
Mastering
420(1)
Product Manufacturer
421(20)
Choosing the Right Manufacturer
421(1)
Compact Disc Production and Manufacture
422(4)
The CD-ROM
426(5)
Cassette Duplication
431(4)
Vinyl Disc Manufacture
435(6)
Marketing and Sales
441(2)
Studio Session Procedures
443(14)
Recording
443(7)
Electric and Electronic Instruments
445(1)
Drums
446(1)
Set Up
447(3)
Overdubbing
450(3)
Mixdown
453(1)
Editing
454(3)
Analog Sequence Editing
454(1)
Digital Sequence Editing
455(2)
Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow
457(8)
Yesterday
457(3)
Today
460(2)
Tomorrow
462(3)
Appendix: Continuing Education 465(4)
Books
465(1)
Magazines
466(1)
Organizations
467(1)
Recording Schools
467(2)
Glossary 469(16)
Index 485

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