9780761924739

The Move to Community Policing; Making Change Happen

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780761924739

  • ISBN10:

    0761924736

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2002-01-28
  • Publisher: Sage Publications, Inc
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Summary

Community policing continues to be of great interest to policy makers, scholars and, of course, local police agencies. Successfully achieving the transformation from a traditional policing model to community policing can be difficult. This book aims to illuminate the path to make that change as easy as possible. Morash and Ford have produced a contributed anthology with original articles from a variety of well-known researchers, police trainers and leaders. They focus on: Recent research for developing data systems to shape police reform Changing the police culture to implement community policing Creating partnership strategies within police organizations and between police and community groups for successful community policing Anticipating future challenges

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Acknowledgments xvii
Transforming Police Organizations
1(14)
J. Kevin Ford
Merry Morash
Stage Model of Change
2(4)
Exploration and Commitment
2(1)
Planning and Implementation
3(1)
Monitoring and Institutionalization
4(2)
Organization of the Book
6(5)
Developing Data-Driven Approaches
6(1)
Changing the Police Culture
7(1)
Creating Partnerships for Community Policing
8(2)
Dealing With Ongoing Challenges in the Shift to Community Policing
10(1)
References
11(4)
PART I Developing Data-Driven Systems
Using Assessment Tools to Jump-Start the Move to Community Policing
15(28)
Cori A. Davis
J. Kevin Ford
Data Gathering as a Process
16(8)
A Data-Driven Model
17(1)
Characteristics of Effective Data
18(1)
Strategies for Collecting Qualitative Data
18(3)
Strategies for Collecting Quantitative Data
21(3)
Facilitated Assessment
24(8)
Open Discussion
25(2)
Structured Self-Assessment
27(2)
Developing an Action Plan
29(3)
Community-Policing Organizational Survey
32(5)
Survey Results: A Case Example
34(1)
Organizational Survey Feedback Process
35(2)
Implications for Planning and Implementing a Change Effort
37(4)
Benefits of Using Both Assessment Tools
37(2)
Impact of Assessment Tool Data
39(1)
Next Steps
40(1)
References
41(2)
Citizen Input and Police Service: Moving Beyond the ``Feel Good'' Community Survey
43(18)
Michael D. Reisig
Citizen Satisfaction as Feedback in the Police Context
45(5)
Police Encounters and Citizen Satisfaction
46(1)
Quality of Life and Citizen Satisfaction
47(1)
Reviving Encounter-Level Satisfaction Research
48(2)
An Integrative Strategy for Acquiring Citizen Input
50(5)
The Middletown Police Department: A Hypothetical Case
50(5)
Conclusion
55(4)
References
59(2)
Using Multiple Methods in Community Crime Prevention and Community-Policing Research: The Case of Project ROAR
61(20)
Andrew L. Giacomazzi
Edmund F. McGarrell
Project ROAR Overview
62(4)
Research Questions and Design
63(1)
Key Findings
64(2)
Discussion of Research Methods and Implementation
66(10)
Process Evaluation
66(3)
Survey Research
69(2)
Offenses Known and Arrest Data
71(1)
Physical and Social Inventory of Neighborhoods
72(3)
Quasi-Experimental Design
75(1)
Conclusion
76(2)
References
78(3)
PART II Changing the Police Culture
Styles of Patrol in a Community Policing Context
81(31)
Stephen D. Mastrofski
James J. Willis
Jeffrey B. Snipes
Research on Patrol Styles
82(5)
Richmond and Its Community-Policing Program
84(1)
Data and Methods
85(2)
Styles of Policing
87(15)
The Professional
88(6)
The Reactor
94(4)
The Tough Cop
98(2)
The Avoider
100(2)
Styles of Policing in a Community-Policing Context
102(4)
Shift Work and Police Style
103(2)
Community Policing and Police Styles: A New Paradigm?
105(1)
Conclusion
106(3)
Notes
109(1)
References
110(2)
Dual Responsibilities: A Model for Immersing Midlevel Managers in Community Policing
112(14)
Mark E. Alley
Elizabeth M. Bonello
Joseph A. Schafer
The Role of Midlevel Managers
113(2)
Traditional Roles
113(1)
New Roles for Cultural Change
114(1)
Engaging Midlevel Managers in Community Policing
115(4)
Geographic Accountability
116(1)
The Move to Dual Responsibilities
117(2)
The Challenges of Dual Responsibility
119(4)
Handling Shift and Geographic Responsibilities
119(1)
Strategies for Meeting the Challenges
120(3)
Conclusion
123(1)
References
124(2)
Organizational Change and Development: Fundamental Principles, Core Dilemmas, and Leadership Challenges in the Move Toward a Community-Policing Strategy
126(29)
J. Kevin Ford
Fundamental Principles of Organizational Change and Development
127(6)
Viewing Organizations as Integrated Systems
128(2)
High Involvement
130(1)
A Continuous Learning Perspective
131(2)
Implications for the Transformation to Community Policing
133(7)
Dealing With the Dilemmas of Change
133(2)
Organizational Change Dilemmas
135(5)
Leadership Challenges for Transforming Police Agencies
140(9)
Preparing the Organization: Creating a Sense of Urgency for the Change
141(1)
Planning for the Change: Creating a Powerful Guidance Team for Change
142(2)
Implementing Change: Creating Opportunities for Innovation
144(2)
Monitoring the Change Effort: Showing Constancy of Purpose
146(1)
Institutionalizing the Change: Building on Successes
147(2)
Conclusion
149(1)
References
149(6)
PART III Creating Partnerships
Focus on Internal Partnerships: A Framework for Implementing Community Policing in a Unionized Department
155(25)
Michael J. Polzin
Julie L. Brockman
Partnerships
156(2)
Working With a Unionized Police Force
158(2)
Chapter Focus
160(1)
The Context for Partnership
161(8)
Union-Management Partnerships
162(3)
Characteristics of Effective Union-Management Partnerships
165(1)
Scope of Authority of the Union-Management Partnership
166(2)
Reducing Resistance
168(1)
A Framework for Building a Union-Management Partnership
169(8)
Stage One: Getting Started
171(2)
Stage Two: Preparing to Change
173(1)
Stage Three: Working Cooperatively
174(2)
Stage Four: Sustaining the Change
176(1)
Ongoing Concerns
176(1)
Conclusion
177(2)
References
179(1)
The Nexus of Community Policing and Domestic Violence
180(24)
Merry Morash
Amanda L. Robinson
An Examination of the Nexus
181(3)
Federal Efforts
181(1)
Community Policing and the Nexus With Domestic Violence
182(2)
Potential for Cooperation at the Nexus
184(6)
Challenges to Cooperation
185(4)
Contemporary Police Practices and Domestic Violence
189(1)
Efforts to Create a Cooperative Nexus of Community Policing and Domestic Violence
190(7)
Community Police Interacting with Parties Involved in Domestic Violence
190(2)
Problem Solving Applied to Domestic Violence
192(2)
Police-Public Partnerships
194(3)
Conclusions and Recommendations
197(3)
Notes
200(1)
References
200(4)
Action Research for Community-Oriented Policing and Comprehensive School Safety Planning
204(19)
Audrey Z. Martini
Monique Fields
Tracey Goss McGinley
Amanda L. Robinson
Merry Morash
Research Methodology
206(4)
Identifying the Components of a Safety Plan
207(1)
Action Research
208(2)
Survey Results
210(4)
Importance of Key Aspects of a Comprehensive School Safety Plan
210(2)
Social Capital to Promote School Safety
212(1)
County-Specific Results
212(2)
Conclusion
214(2)
Appendix: School Safety Summit Survey
216(6)
References
222(1)
Social Capital, Collective Action, and Community Policing: A Case Study in Sioux City, Iowa
223(20)
Mark E. Correia
Overview of Recent Sioux City History
224(3)
Changing Demographics and Economic Base
224(1)
Policing in Sioux City: An Example of Community Policing
225(2)
CAST Successes and Problems
227(4)
Collective Action
227(2)
Social Capital
229(1)
Social Capital and Social Responsibility
230(1)
Research Focus
231(5)
Data Collection and Methods
231(1)
Measurement
232(1)
Analysis of Community Cohesion
233(3)
Discussion
236(1)
Notes
237(1)
References
238(5)
PART IV Dealing With Ongoing Challenges
The Challenge of Effective Organizational Change: Lessons Learned in Community-Policing Implementation
243(21)
Joseph A. Schafer
Impediments to Organizational Change
244(7)
Organizational Issues
245(4)
Human Issues
249(2)
A Case Study of Community Policing in Motor City
251(10)
Historical Perspective
252(2)
Evaluating the MCPD Model
254(3)
Lessons Learned
257(4)
Conclusion
261(1)
Notes
262(1)
References
262(2)
Reflections on the Move to Community Policing
264(13)
David L. Carter
Developing a Perspective
264(2)
The Past as Future
266(3)
Project STAR
268(1)
Integrated Criminal Apprehension Program (ICAP)
269(1)
Problem-Oriented and Community Policing: Development and Integration
269(4)
Breaking the Bonds of Tradition
271(1)
Quality Management and Change to Community Policing
272(1)
Final Thoughts
273(2)
Note
275(1)
References
275(2)
Directing the Future of Community-Policing Initiatives
277(12)
Merry Marash
J. Kevin Ford
Jane P. White
Jerome G. Boles III
The Core Elements of Community Policing
278(1)
Key Challenges
279(8)
A Customer-Based Organizational Transformation
279(4)
Unlimited Partnerships
283(3)
Unified Effort to Solve Problems
286(1)
Decision Points
287(2)
Index 289(4)
About the Editors 293(2)
About the Contributors 295

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