9780567623782

Paul's Financial Policy A Socio-Theological Approach

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780567623782

  • ISBN10:

    0567623785

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2013-12-19
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury T&T Clark

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Summary

This book attempts to prove the consistent nature of Paul's financial policy by drawing from his social environment and theological convictions to tease out a three-way relational pattern with God as the source of all possessions. This three-way relational framework not only dictates Paul's decision to accept or reject finances from his churches but also directly challenges long-standing claims made about Paul's financial policy. After outlining the various approaches that scholars have taken to make sense of Paul's seemingly inconsistent financial policy, this book provides a close exegetical analysis of relevant passages in Philippians, 1 Corinthians, and 2Corinthians in order to unearth a three-way relational pattern found in Philippians but that is absent from the Corinthian Correspondence. In Paul's positive gift-exchange relationship with the Philippians, God is acknowledged as the source of all possessions, whereas the Corinthians are criticized for striving after two-way exchanges that result in honor, power, and prestige.After this is demonstrated, a socio-theological reason for Paul's refusal of Corinthian gifts is propounded. Paul refused Corinthian support, not because they desired to patronise him as a dependent client, but because they sought to be under Paul as their superior, an act that neglected God as the superior source of all gifts in the divine economy. Paul therefore refuses their support to avoid two-way relationships of gift so prevalent in ancient society and to underscore the source of the gift of the gospel, the one from whom and through whom and to whom are all things - God.

Author Biography

David E. Briones is an Adjunct Professor of Biblical Studies at Biola and Azusa Pacific University. He completed his PhD under the supervision of Professor John M.G. Barclay at Durham University, England and has written articles accepted by NTS and JSNT.

Table of Contents

1. Approaches to Paul's Financial Policy/2. Contextualising Paul/3. Paul's Positive Gift-Giving Relationship with the Philippians/4. Paul's Negative Relationship with the Corinthians (1 Cor. 9)/5. Paul's Negative Relationship with the Corinthians (2 Cor. 11-12)/6. Conclusions

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