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9780817313111

Philadelphia and the Development of Americanist Archaeology

by ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780817313111

  • ISBN10:

    0817313117

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2003-09-15
  • Publisher: Univ of Alabama Pr

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Summary

For two and a half centuries, Philadelphians have been actively involved in archaeological research. In particular, three vital and venerable cultural institutions-the American Philosophical Society (founded 1743), the Academy of Natural Sciences (founded 1812), and the University Museum of the University of Pennsylvania (founded 1893)-have nurtured the "systematic study of antiquities." The ten essays in this volume focus on Philadelphians who were concerned with Americanist archaeology, or the "archaeology of the New World." As Europeans, and later, Euroamericans, spread across North, Central, and South America in the 16th through the 19th centuries, they encountered a bewildering variety of native peoples, customs, and languages, as well as tens of thousands of ancient ruins attesting to a long endemic culture history of obvious complexity. The essays examine most of the key players in the development of the methods to study these phenomena. Enlightenment scholars such as Benjamin Smith Barton, Peter S. Duponceau, Thomas Jefferson, Daniel Garrison Brinton, John Wesley Powell, and Benjamin Rush all contributed to the surge of scientific study of America's prehistoric cultures. So did two pioneering women who have received scant attention to date-Sara Yorke Stevenson and Lucy W. Wilson-but whose work is well treated in this study. Other essays detail the varied contributions of C. C. Abbott, Frank Hamilton Cushing, Clarence B. Moore, Edgar Lee Hewett, and John L. Cotter. This volume should stimulate continued interest in the origins and history of archaeology and the relationship of Philadelphia patrons and institutions to scientific inquiry.

Table of Contents

List of Illustrations vii
Foreword ix
JEREMY A. SABLOFF
Introduction xi
DON D. FOWLER AND DAVID R. WILCOX
1 Drab Doves Take Flight: The Dilemmas of Early Americanise Archaeology in Philadelphia, 1889-1900 1(20)
CURTIS M. HINSLEY
2 Toward Consensus on the Scope of Anthropology: Daniel Garrison Brinton and the View from Philadelphia 21(15)
REGNA DARNELL
3 Unsung Visionary: Sara Yorke Stevenson and the Development of Archaeology in Philadelphia 36(12)
ELIN C. DANIEN AND ELEANOR M. KING
4 In the Heat of Controversy: C.C. Abbott, the American Paleolithic, and the University Museum, 1889-1893 48(40)
DAVID J. MELTZER
5 Restoring Authenticity: Judging Frank Hamilton Cushing's Veracity 88(25)
DAVID R. WILCOX
6 Clarence Bloomfield Moore: A Philadelphia Archaeologist in the Southeastern United States 113(21)
LAWRENCE E. ATEN AND JERALD T. MILANICH
7 Lucy L.W. Wilson, Ph.D.: An Eastern Educator and the Southwestern Pueblos 134(22)
FRANCES JOAN MATHIEN
8 The Second Largest City in the English-Speaking World: John L. Cotter and the Historical Archaeology of Philadelphia, 1960-1999 156(9)
ROBERT L. SCHUYLER
9 Archaeology, Philadelphia, and Understanding Nineteenth-Century American Culture 165(16)
STEVEN CONN
10 Philarivalium 181(8)
ALICE BECK KEHOE
Appendix 189(6)
References 195(36)
Contributors 231(4)
Index 235

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