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Philosophic Classics : From Plato to Derrida,9780130485618
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Philosophic Classics : From Plato to Derrida

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780130485618

ISBN10:
0130485616
Media:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2003
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $78.80
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Summary

For one-semester courses in Introduction to Philosophy, History of Philosophy, History of Philosophy survey, or History of Intellectual Thought. This anthology in the survey of Western philosophy, from the Ancient Greeks to the 20th-century, features the best available translations of textscomplete works or complete sections of works. Introductions to each historical period and to each philosopher, an abundance of drawings, diagrams, photographs, and a timeline help to keep students focused throughout.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Ancient Greek Philosophy
1(244)
Plato
3(140)
Euthyphro
8(13)
Apology
21(17)
Crito
38(8)
Phaedo (72c-83c, 114e end)
46(12)
Meno
58(24)
Republic (Book II, 357a-362c, 368c-376c; Book III, 412b-417b; Book IV, c-448e; Book V, complete: 448e-480a; Book VI-VII, 502c-521b)
82(61)
Aristotle
143(102)
Categories (Chapters 1-5)
147(5)
Physics (Book II complete)
152(11)
Metaphysics (Bk I, 1-4, 6, 9; and XII, 6-9)
163(16)
On the Soul (Book II, Chapters 1-3; III, 4-5)
179(6)
Nichomachean Ethics (Bk I-II; VI-VII; X, 6-8)
185(60)
Hellenistic Philosophy
245(36)
Epicurus
248(9)
Letter to Menoeceus
250(4)
Principal Doctrines
254(3)
Epictetus
257(14)
Encheiridion (Manual)
259(12)
Plotinus
271(10)
Enneads (Ennead I, Tractate 6)
273(8)
Christianity and Medieval Philosophy
281(112)
Augustine
287(29)
Confessions (Book VIII, 5, 8-12 and XI, 14-28)
290(15)
City of God (Book XII, Chapters 1-9)
305(11)
Boethius
316(6)
The Consolation of Philosophy (Book V, Chapter 6)
318(4)
Anselm (and Gaunilo)
322(9)
Proslogion (Preface, Chapters 1-4)
324(2)
Gaunilo and Anselm: Debate (Selections)
326(5)
Hildegard of Bingen
331(7)
Scivias (Book I, Vision 4, 16-20)
333(5)
Moses Maimonides
338(7)
The Guide for the Perplexed (Part II, Introduction)
340(5)
Thomas Aquinas
345(34)
Summa Theologica (Selections)
349(30)
William of Ockham
379(8)
Summa Logicae (Part I, Chapters 14-16)
382(5)
Pico Della Mirandola
387(6)
Oration on the Dignity of Man (1-7)
389(4)
Modern Philosophy
393(536)
Rene Descartes
395(52)
Meditations on the First Philosophy
399(44)
Correspondence with Princess Elizabeth (selections)
443(4)
Thomas Hobbes
447(42)
Leviathan (selections from Chapters 1-3, 6, 9, 12-15, 17-18, 21)
450(39)
Blaise Pascal
489(9)
Pensees (selections)
492(6)
Baruch Spinoza
498(54)
Ethics (Sections I & II)
500(52)
John Locke
552(57)
An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (abridged)
554(55)
Gottfried Leibniz
609(40)
Discourse on Metaphysics
612(28)
The Monadology
640(9)
George Berkeley
649(62)
Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous
652(59)
David Hume
711(80)
An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding
714(77)
Jean-Jacques Rousseau
791(12)
The Social Contract (Book I)
794(9)
Immanuel Kant
803(119)
Prolegomena to Any Future Metaphysics
807(72)
Foundation for the Metaphysics of Morals
879(43)
Mary Wollstonecraft
922(7)
A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (Chapter 6)
924(5)
Nineteenth-Century Philosophy
929(134)
G. W. F. Hagel
931(12)
Phenomenology of Spirit (B, IV, A: ``Independence and Dependence of Self-Consciousness: Relations of Master and Servant'')
934(6)
Who Thinks Abstractly?
940(3)
John Stuart Mill
943(42)
Utilitarianism
946(39)
Søren Kiergegaard
985(23)
Fear and Trembling (Problema I: ``Teleological Suspention of the Ethical'')
989(8)
Concluding Unscientific Postscript (Section II, Chapter 2, ``Subjective Truth, Inwardness: Truth Is Subjectivity'')
997(11)
Karl Marx
1008(23)
Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1894 (``Alienated Labor'')
1011(9)
Manifesto of the Communist Party (Chapters 1, 2, 4)
1020(10)
A Contribution to the Critique of Political Economy (Preface)
1030(1)
Friedrich Nietzsche
1031(32)
The Birth of Tragedy (Chapters 1-3)
1035(6)
Thus Spoke Zarathustra (First Part, 1-3)
1041(3)
Twilight of the Idols (Selections)
1044(16)
The Anti-Christ (First Book, 2-7, 62)
1060(3)
Twentieth-Century Philosophy
1063
Edmund Husserl
1067
Phenomenology (Encyclopaedia Brittanica article)
1070
Bertrand Russell
1078
The Problems of Philosophy (Chapters 1 & 15)
1081
Martin Heidegger
1090
An Introduction to Metaphysics (Chapter 1: ``The Fundamental Question of Metaphysics'')
1095
Ludwig Wittgenstein
1121
Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (Sections 1-3.1431,4, 4.06, 4.1, 5, 5.6, 6.4-7)
1121
Philosophical Investigations (Paragraphs 1-47, 65-71, 241, 257-58, 305, 309)
1133
Jean-Paul Sartre
1150
Being and Nothingness (Chapter 2: ``Bad Faith'' [selections])
1154
Existentialism Is a Humanism (Selections)
1169
Willard Van Orman Quine
1176
Two Dogmas of Empiricism
1179
Jacques Derrida
1194
Signature, Event, Context
1198

Excerpts

There is no better introduction to philosophy than to read some of the great philosophers. But few books are more difficult to read than Aristotle'sMetaphysicsor Spinoza'sEthics.Even works that are less puzzling are sometimes like snippets of a conversation that you overhear on entering a room: What is said is clear, only you cannot be sure you have got the point because you do not know just what has gone before. A slight point may be crucial to refute some earlier suggestion, and a seemingly pointless remark may contain a barbed allusion. As a result of this difficulty, some students of philosophy cry out for a simple summary of the "central doctrines" of the great philosophers. Yet carving up great books to excerpt essential doctrines is one of the greatest sins against the spirit of philosophy. If the reading of a whole Platonic dialogue leaves one more doubtful and less sure of oneself than the perusal of a brief summary, so much the better. It is part of the point of philosophy to make us a little less sure about things. After all, Socrates himself insisted that what distinguished him from other persons was not that he knew all, or even most, answers but rather that he realized his ignorance. Still, one need not despair of joining this ongoing conversation. In the first place, you can get in near the beginning of this conversation by starting with Plato and moving on from there. Given that they are over two thousand years old, his early dialogues are surprisingly easy to follow. The later Platonic dialogues, Aristotle, and much which follows will be more difficult, but by that point you will have some idea of what the conversation is about. Secondly, the structure of this book is designed to make this conversation accessible. There are section introductions and introductions to' the individual philosophers. These latter introductions are divided into three sections: (1) biographical (a glimpse of the life), (2) philosophical (a resume of the philosopher's thought), and (3) bibliographical (suggestions for further reading). To give a sense of the development of ideas, there are short representative passages from some of the less important, but transitional, thinkers. To make all the works more readable, most footnotes treating textual matters (variant readings, etc.) have been omitted and all Greek words have been transliterated and put in angle brackets. My goal throughout this volume is to be unobtrusive and allow you to hear, and perhaps join in, the ongoing conversation that is Western philosophy. For this edition a number of small changes have been made including the addition of selections from Hildegard of Bingen, Descartes' correspondence with Princess Elizabeth, Rousseau, Wollstonecraft, and additional material from Plato, Anselm, and Locke. The translations of Plato'sApology and Crito,Plotinus'sEnneads,Anselm'sProslogion,Marx'sEconomic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844,and Martin Hiedegger'sIntroduction to Metaphysicshave also been changed. Throughout the editing of this edition, I have tried to follow the same three principles I used in the individual volumes of thePhilosophic Classicsseries: (1) to use complete works or, where more appropriate, complete sections of works (2) in clear translations (3) of texts central to the thinker's philosophy or widely accepted as part of the "canon." Those who use this volume in a one-term introduction to philosophy, history of philosophy, or history of intellectual thought course will find more material here than can easily fit a normal semester. But this embarrassment of riches gives teachers some choice and, for those who offer the same course year after year, an opportunity to change the menu.


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