9780226711164

Pottery Analysis: A Sourcebook

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780226711164

  • ISBN10:

    0226711161

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2005-12-01
  • Publisher: Univ of Chicago Pr
  • View Upgraded Edition

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

A rich and comprehensive sourcebook,PotteryAnalysisdraws together diverse approaches to the study of potteryarchaeological, ethnographic, stylistic, functional, and physicochemical. Prudence M. Rice uses pottery as a starting point for insights into people and culture and examines in detail the methods for studying these fired clay vessels that have been used worldwide from prehistoric times to the present.Pottery Analysisis a classic in its field as well as an invaluable reference for all students of archaeology and ancient culture.

Author Biography

Prudence M. Rice is professor of anthropology, associate vice chancellor for research, and director of the research development office at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.

Table of Contents

List of Figures
xv
List of Tables
xix
Preface xxi
Part 1 Introduction
Pottery and Its History
3(28)
Pottery and Ceramics: Definitions and Products
3(3)
History of Pottery and Ceramics
6(18)
Pottery and Ceramics in the Old World
10(1)
The Near East
10(2)
The Far East
12(5)
Europe and the Mediterranean
17(2)
Pottery in the New World
19(5)
Overview of Pottery Studies
24(2)
References
26(5)
Part 2 The Raw Materials of Pottery Making
Clays: Their Origin and Definitions
31(23)
Earth Materials
31(4)
Feldspars, Weathering, and Clay Origins
35(1)
Definitions of Clays
36(15)
Depositional Situation of Clays
36(2)
Granulometry of Clays
38(2)
Chemical Definitions of Clays
40(3)
Mineralogical Definitions of Clays
43(2)
Phyllosilicates
45(5)
Lath-Structure Clays
50(1)
Commercial Uses of Clays
50(1)
Functional Definitions of Clays
51(2)
References
53(1)
Properties of Clays I: The Clay/Water System
54(26)
The Clay/Water System
54(4)
Plasticity
58(5)
Factors Influencing Plasticity
58(2)
Measuring Plasticity
60(3)
Drying and Shrinkage
63(9)
Water in the System
63(2)
Processes of Drying and Shrinkage
65(2)
Drying Defects and Green Strength
67(4)
Measuring Shrinkage
71(1)
Inclusions and Impurities
72(6)
Coarse Inclusions
72(4)
Colloids, Ions, and Organics
76(2)
References
78(2)
Properties of Clays II: Firing Behavior
80(33)
Variables of Firing
80(6)
Physical and Chemical Changes in Firing
86(16)
Loss of Volatiles
87(3)
Changes in the Clay Minerals
90(3)
Changes in Inclusions and Impurities
93(1)
Quartz
94(2)
Feldspar
96(1)
Calcium
97(1)
Glaze Formation
98(4)
Summary
102(8)
The Thermal Reaction Sequence
102(2)
The Fired Product: Stresses and Defects
104(3)
Some Considerations of Firing Technology
107(3)
References
110(3)
Part 3 Pottery Manufacture and Use
Pottery Manufacturing Technology: An Ethnographic Overview
113(55)
Ethnographic Pottery Studies
113(2)
Obtaining and Preparing Resources
115(9)
Tools and Techniques
115(5)
Ethnographic Examples
120(4)
Forming, Finishing, and Decorating
124(28)
Forming: Tools and Techniques
124(1)
Hand Building and Molding
125(3)
Throwing
128(4)
Supports and Rotational Devices
132(4)
Finishing: Tools and Techniques
136(5)
Forming and Finishing: Ethnographic Examples
141(3)
Surface Enhancement
144(1)
Surface Penetration or Displacement
144(3)
Additions to the Surface
147(5)
Drying and Firing
152(14)
Tools and Techniques
152(1)
Nonkiln Firing
153(5)
Kiln Firing
158(5)
Postfiring Treatments
163(1)
Ethnographic Examples
164(2)
References
166(2)
Pottery Economics: Perspectives on Production and Distribution
168(39)
Anthropology and Commodity Production
168(8)
Economic Anthropological Literature
169(1)
Concepts in the Study of Production
170(2)
Ethnographic Overview: A Focus on Firing
172(1)
Firing Loss Rates
173(1)
Fuel Costs
174(2)
Issues in the Study of Pottery Production
176(15)
Location of Production
177(3)
Organization of Production
180(1)
Scale of Production
180(2)
Mode of Production
182(1)
Models of Production and Specialization
183(8)
Distribution and Exchange
191(10)
Ethnographic Overview
191(6)
Archaeological Approaches and Models of Distribution
197(4)
Variability in Ceramic Products
201(3)
Summary and Conclusions
204(1)
References
205(2)
Vessel Function: Form, Technology, and Use
207(37)
Vessel Function
207(4)
Kinds of Vessel Functions
208(2)
Determining Vessel Function
210(1)
Vessel Form: Relating Form and Function
211(15)
Anatomy of a Vessel
212(3)
Description of Form
215(1)
Inferred Use Classifications
215(2)
Vessel Contour Classifications
217(2)
Geometric or Volume Classifications
219(3)
Reconstructing Form from Sherds
222(2)
Use-Related Properties: Capacity, Stability, Accessibility, and Transportability
224(2)
Composition and Properties: Relating Technology to Use
226(6)
Thickness
227(1)
Resistance to Mechanical Stress
228(1)
Thermal Behavior
228(2)
Permeability/Porosity/Density
230(2)
Surface Treatment
232(1)
Direct Evidence of Use
232(4)
Identification of Contents
232(2)
Use Wear
234(1)
Fireclouding and Sooting
235(1)
Summary: Form, Technology, and Use
236(6)
Vessel Functions
237(4)
Vessel Forms
241(1)
References
242(2)
Pottery Decorative Styles and Stylistic Analysis
244(30)
What Is Style?
244(8)
Origins of Styles
245(1)
Terminology of Styles
246(3)
Analysis and Interpretation of Decorative Styles in Pottery
249(3)
Design Elements and Interaction
252(6)
Critiques of the Interaction Theory
254(3)
Critiques of the Element Analysis Method
257(1)
Alternative Approaches to Style
258(11)
Symmetry Analysis
260(4)
Design Structure Analysis
264(2)
Information, Diversity, and Symbols
266(3)
Summary: Additional Considerations and Problems
269(3)
Problems of Method
269(1)
Problems of Interpretation
270(2)
References
272(2)
Special Topics in Archaeological, Ethnoarchaeological, and Ethnographic Pottery Studies
274(35)
Pottery Classification
274(14)
Devised Classifications
275(2)
Folk Classifications
277(5)
Issues in Archaeological Pottery Classification
282(1)
Descriptive and Chronological Systematics
282(1)
Are Types ``Real'' or ``Artificial''?
283(2)
Statistical Approaches to Classification
285(1)
What Is the Purpose of Classification?
286(1)
Summary
287(1)
Pottery Quantification
288(5)
Sampling
289(1)
Counts, Weights, and Vessel Equivalents
290(3)
Assemblage Composition and Site Formation Processes
293(13)
Ceramic Assemblages
293(1)
Ethnographic Ceramic Censuses
293(7)
Archaeological Approaches to Assemblages
300(1)
Site Formation Processes
301(5)
References
306(3)
Part 4 Characterization Studies of Pottery
Ceramic Characterization: An Introduction
309(22)
Characterization
309(1)
Technological Ceramic Studies
310(7)
Historical Background
310(3)
Technological Properties
313(1)
Ceramic Ecology
314(3)
Research Design Considerations
317(10)
Identifying Problems
317(1)
Selecting a Sample
318(1)
Sampling Resources
319(2)
Sampling Sherd Collections
321(3)
Sampling for Analysis
324(2)
Selecting Methods of Analysis
326(1)
Interpreting Technological and Characterization Studies
327(2)
References
329(2)
The Color of Ceramic Materials
331(16)
Human Perception of Color
331(2)
Source of the Property and Its Variability
333(6)
Organic Matter
334(1)
Iron Compounds
335(1)
Other Colorants
336(1)
Glaze Colorants
337(2)
Measuring Color
339(4)
Estimating Firing Conditions from Color
343(2)
References
345(2)
Physical, Mechanical, and Thermal Properties of Pottery
347(24)
Microstructure
348(2)
Porosity
350(4)
Hardness and Strength
354(9)
Hardness
354(3)
Strength
357(6)
Thermal Properties and Stresses
363(7)
Thermal Properties
364(2)
Factors Influencing Thermal Stress Resistance
366(1)
Intrinsic Properties
366(1)
Temperature
367(1)
Microstructure
367(1)
Shape and Design
368(2)
References
370(1)
Mineralogical and Chemical Characterization of Pottery
371(35)
Objectives and Sampling: Additional Considerations
371(4)
Mineralogical Analysis
375(14)
Petrographic Characterization
376(1)
Some Principles of Optical Crystallography
376(1)
The Polarizing Microscope
377(2)
Petrographic Methods
379(3)
X-Ray Diffraction
382(4)
Thermal Analysis
386(2)
Other Methods of Mineral Identification
388(1)
Chemical Analysis
389(11)
Classical Methods
391(1)
Physical Methods
391(1)
Optical Emission Spectroscopy
392(1)
X-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy
393(2)
Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy
395(1)
Neutron Activation Analysis
396(2)
X-Ray Milliprobe
398(1)
Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission
398(1)
Mossbauer Spectroscopy
398(2)
X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy
400(1)
Structural and Microstructural Characterization
400(4)
Electron Microscopy
400(1)
Transmission and Scanning Electron Microscopes
401(1)
Electron Microprobe
402(1)
X-Ray Radiography
403(1)
References
404(2)
Special Topics in Ceramic Characterization Studies
406(43)
What Is ``Temper''?
406(7)
Problems in Terminology
408(1)
Distinguishing Natural from Added Substances
409(2)
Alternative Terms
411(2)
Provenience Studies
413(13)
Assumptions and Procedures
413(5)
Confounding Issues in Provenience Studies
418(1)
Selecting Elements for Analysis
419(2)
Comparing Sherds and Clays
421(3)
Provenience and Production
424(2)
Archaeothermometry: Estimating Firing Temperature
426(9)
Physical Properties
427(3)
Chemical Analysis
430(1)
Mineralogy
430(2)
Thermal Analysis
432(2)
Summary
434(1)
Dating and Authentication
435(10)
Relative Dating
436(2)
Chronometric Dating
438(1)
Radiocarbon Dating
438(1)
Archaeomagnetic Dating
439(1)
Thermoluminescence Dating
440(3)
Authentication
443(2)
References
445(4)
Part 5 Epilogue
Continuity and Change in the Modern World
449(22)
Change in Pottery Systems
449(10)
Changes in the Products: The ``Arts of Acculturation''
450(6)
Changes in the Society
456(3)
Continuity in Pottery Systems
459(7)
Continuity in the Society
461(3)
Continuity in the Products
464(2)
Implications for Archaeology
466(3)
References
469(2)
Glossary 471(16)
References 487(56)
Index 543

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