9781593852153

Response to Intervention Principles and Strategies for Effective Practice

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9781593852153

  • ISBN10:

    1593852150

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2005-10-06
  • Publisher: The Guilford Press
  • View Upgraded Edition

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

Meeting a key need, this is the first comprehensive guide to implementing a schoolwide response to intervention (RTI) program. The book is geared to helping practitioners understand and respond to No Child Left Behind and to the new special education eligibility guidelines outlined in IDEIA 2004. Presented are the theoretical and empirical foundations of the approach and a clear, 10-step model for conducting RTI procedures with students experiencing learning difficulties. Special features include reproducible planning and implementation worksheets and more than two dozen overhead transparency masters for use in RTI training sessions, with lay-flat binding to facilitate photocopying. For optimal utility, RTI training materials are also available online as PowerPoint slides and PDFs (www.guilford.com/rti).

Author Biography

Rachel Brown-Chidsey, PhD, is Associate Professor and Coordinator of the School Psychology Program at the University of Southern Maine. Prior to obtaining her doctorate at the University of Massachusetts/n-/Amherst, she taught middle and high school history and special education for 10 years. Her research areas include curriculum-based measurement, response to intervention, and scientifically based reading instruction methods. Dr. Brown-Chidsey participated in the 2002 Multi-Site Conference on Future of School Psychology and subsequently edited [i]Assessment for Intervention: A Problem-Solving Approach[/i], which stemmed from the research presented at the conference. Dr. Brown-Chidsey is a nationally certified school psychologist and a licensed psychologist, and she has served on the Maine Advisory Board for School Psychological Service Providers and the Maine Task Force for Special Education Eligibility.

Mark W. Steege, PhD, is Professor and Clinical Coordinator of the School Psychology Program at the University of Southern Maine. Dr. Steege earned his doctorate at the University of Iowa and completed postdoctoral work as a pediatric psychologist at the University of Iowa College of Medicine. His research areas include functional behavioral assessment, interventions for individuals with developmental disabilities, and assessment of autism spectrum disorders. Dr. Steege coauthored [i]Conducting School-Based Functional Behavioral Assessments: A Practitioner's Guide[/i], with T. Steuart Watson, and has published numerous articles related to applied behavior analysis, functional behavioral assessment, and single-subject research design.

Table of Contents

List of Figures, Tables, Boxes, Forms, and Overheads
xiv
Introduction: What Is Response to Intervention (RTI)?
1(12)
History
3(1)
Key Features of RTI
3(3)
RTI and Problem Solving
6(3)
Problem Identification
7(1)
Problem Definition
7(1)
Designing Intervention Plans
7(1)
Implementing the Intervention
8(1)
Problem Solution
8(1)
RTI and Special Education
9(1)
RTI and General Education
10(1)
RTI and Public Policy
10(1)
Big Ideas about RTI
11(2)
NCLB, IDEIA, and RTI: Linkages across National Education Policies
13(7)
Historical Context of RTI
13(1)
RTI Components in NCLB
14(3)
No Child Left Behind
14(1)
Reading First
15(1)
Early Reading First
15(1)
Anticipating Student Needs: Prevention on Multiple Levels
16(1)
RTI Components in IDEIA 2004
17(1)
Emerging Standards in Education Policy
18(2)
RTI Instead of Discrepancy Models
20(7)
RTI and Special Education
20(1)
Problems with IQ--Achievement Discrepancies
21(3)
Why Is the IQ--Achievement Equation Problematic?
21(1)
Responding Instead of Waiting
22(2)
Empirical Support for RTI in Special Education Practice
24(1)
RTI as Part of Special Education
25(1)
Summary
26(1)
Evidence-Based Interventions
27(13)
What Is the Rationale for Requiring an Evidence Base for Interventions?
30(3)
Do Anecdotal Reports, Subjective Opinions, or Testimonials Constitute Evidence?
33(2)
What Constitutes Evidence?
35(3)
Empirical Validation in School Settings
38(1)
A Cautionary Note about Evidence
38(1)
Summary
39(1)
Single-Subject Experimental Design
40(15)
Single-Subject Methods as Part of RTI
41(6)
Basic Components of Single-Subject Experimental Designs
41(4)
Comparing Interventions
45(1)
Test Driving the Intervention
45(2)
Documenting Student Performance over Time
47(1)
Case Examples
47(7)
Case Study
47(1)
Multiple-Baseline across Behaviors Design with Generalization
48(1)
Multiple-Baseline across Behaviors Design without Generalization
49(1)
Alternating Interventions
50(2)
Comparing Performance across Multiple Dependent Variables
52(2)
Summary
54(1)
Single-Subject Research and RTI: A Natural Collaboration
55(9)
Integrating Empirically Based Instruction and Data
55(1)
Key Features of Effective Instruction
55(5)
Content
56(1)
Delivery
57(1)
Pace
57(2)
Responses
59(1)
Assessment
59(1)
Key Features of Data Collection and Analysis
60(3)
Target Skill or Behavior
60(2)
Setting(s)
62(1)
Data Recording Procedures
62(1)
Analysis and Interpretation
62(1)
Summary
63(1)
Using RTI Procedures for Assessment of Academic Difficulties
64(35)
Using RTI to Meet Students' Needs
64(23)
Step 1: Implement Evidence-Based General Education Instructional Methods
64(3)
Step 2: Collect Benchmarks of All Students' Performance Three Times during the School Year
67(6)
Step 3: Identify Which Students Scored below the Benchmark Target(s)
73(2)
Step 4: Provide Daily Scientifically Based Small-Group Instruction
75(6)
Step 5: Monitor Student Progress toward the Benchmark(s), Using Frequent Assessments
81(3)
Step 6: Review, Revise, and/or Discontinue Small-Group Instruction
84(1)
Step 7: Increase the Intensity, Duration, and/or Frequency of Instruction
84(1)
Step 8: Review, Revise, and/or Discontinue Small-Group Instruction
85(1)
Step 9: Comprehensive Evaluation, If Needed
85(1)
Step 10: Special Education Eligibility
85(2)
Summary
87(12)
Using RTI Procedures with Students from Diverse Backgrounds: Considering Ability, Culture, Language, Race, and Religion
99(9)
Diverse Student Backgrounds and Needs
99(5)
Ability
100(1)
Culture
101(1)
Language
102(1)
Race
102(1)
Religion
103(1)
Fairness and Equity in Education
104(3)
Assessment
104(2)
How RTI Connects Diverse Backgrounds
106(1)
Conclusion
107(1)
Using RTI Procedures as Part of Special Education Eligibility Decision Making
108(9)
Students with Academic Difficulties
108(7)
Reading Fundamentals: The Case of Jody
108(1)
Reading Roadblocks: The Case of Lilly
109(2)
Math Disdain or Disability: The Case of Rowena
111(2)
Writing Blues: The Case of Maureen
113(2)
Summary
115(2)
RTI Reports: Formal Evidence of Student Progress
117(22)
Types of Reports
117(6)
Brief Summary Reports
117(2)
Longitudinal Data Summary Reports
119(4)
Full Psychological Evaluation Reports
123(1)
Evaluation Report Components
123(4)
Problem Identification
123(1)
Problem Definition
124(2)
Exploring Solutions
126(1)
Report Examples
127(11)
Mary Ann's Math Troubles: No Disability Found
127(5)
Luke: Identification of Disability Using RTI and Cognitive Measures
132(3)
Jane: Additional Assessment Is Needed
135(3)
Summary
138(1)
Training Educators to Use RTI Methods
139(18)
Training Procedures
139(1)
A Needed Paradigm Shift
139(1)
Personnel Involved in RTI Practices
140(1)
Training Components
141(2)
Schedule
141(1)
Learning Outcomes
142(1)
Indicators of Mastery
143(1)
Training Slides
143(14)
Frequently Asked Questions . . .and Our Best Responses: Some Conclusions about RTI
157(6)
Benefits of RTI
160(1)
Principles, Skills, and Practices
160(1)
RTI Applications
161(1)
General Education
161(1)
Special Education
161(1)
Future Directions
162(1)
References 163(10)
Index 173

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