9780471450283

The Restaurant: From Concept to Operation, 4th Edition

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780471450283

  • ISBN10:

    0471450286

  • Edition: 4th
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2004-10-01
  • Publisher: Wiley

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

A successful restaurant is a dream business. It offers guests a fabulous experience, while the restaurateur gets an exciting workplace, creative license, and potentially nice profit margins. Of course, restaurant success does not arrive on a silver platter. It takes know-how, the right planning, and access to quality information. A one-stop guide to the business, The Restaurant: From Concept to Operation, Fifth Edition gives readers the knowledge they need to conceive, open, and run any type of restaurant, from fast-food franchise to upscale dining room. The book progresses logically, from choosing a good concept to finding a market, developing business and marketing plans, and securing financial backing. Topics covered include location selection, permits and legal issues, menu development, interior design, and employee hiring and training. Along the way, such all-important skills as turning first-time guests into regular patrons are also described. Special features of this Fifth Edition include: Increased focus on the independent restaurateur, with greater emphasis on restaurant business plans, A new chapter on food production and sanitation, Greater emphasis on restaurant business plans, including new exercises, New Profiles, which describe a recently opened restaurant, begin Parts 1, 2, 3, and 4, New coverage of restaurant concepts and use of technology in restaurants, Expanded sections on back-of-the-house and control contents; franchising; and leasing and insurance. This field-proven guide gives students, chefs, and entrepreneurs all of the skills and information they need to master every challenge and succeed in this highly competitive and rewarding industry. Book jacket.

Author Biography

JOHN R. WALKER, DBA, CHA, FMP, is the McKibbon Professor of Hotel and Restaurant Management at the School of Hotel and Restaurant Management at the University of South Florida, Sarasota-Manatee.<BR> DONALD E. LUNDBERG, PHD, (deceased) was dean of the College of Business at United States International University and Professor Emeritus at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, California.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Acknowledgments xvii
Introduction
1(16)
Liabilities of Restaurant Operation
4(1)
French Culinary History
5(1)
The Birth of Restaurants in America
5(1)
The Restaurant Failure Rate
6(1)
Buy, Build, Franchise, or Manage?
7(6)
Starting from Scratch
13(1)
Restaurants as Roads to Riches
14(1)
Summary
14(3)
Kinds and Characteristics of Restaurants and Their Owners
17(33)
Kinds and Characteristics of Restaurants
18(2)
The Big Boys Compared with Independent Operators
20(1)
Quick-Service Restaurants
20(9)
Colonel Sanders
21(1)
Wendy's International Restaurants
22(1)
Carl Karcher
23(1)
Cleo R. Ludwig, Founder of L-K Restaurants
24(1)
Regional Burger Chains
25(1)
The Subway Story
26(3)
The Mexican Restaurant
29(1)
Steakhouses
29(4)
The Lore of Steak
30(1)
Outback Steakhouse
31(2)
Fine-Dining Restaurants
33(1)
Seafood Restaurants
34(1)
Italian Restaurants
35(2)
Chinese Restaurants
37(1)
Theme Restaurants
38(3)
The Chef-Owner Restaurant
41(2)
Women Chefs as Restaurant Partners
43(1)
Notable Female Restaurateurs
44(1)
The Bakery-Cafe
45(1)
Centralized Home Delivery Restaurants
46(1)
Summary
47(3)
Concept, Location, and Design
50(48)
Restaurant Concepts
51(5)
Concept: Clear-Cut or Ambiguous?
52(2)
Protecting the Restaurant's Name
54(1)
The McDonald's Concept and Image
54(2)
Defining the Concept and Market
56(1)
The Fine Line Between Junk and Funk
57(1)
Successful Restaurant Concepts
58(7)
Concept Adaptation
65(1)
Changing or Modifying a Concept
66(1)
Copy and Improve
67(1)
Restaurant Symbology
67(1)
When a Concept Fails
68(1)
The Multiple-Concept Chain
69(1)
Sequence of Restaurant Development: From Concept to Opening
70(2)
Planning Services
71(1)
Common Denominators of Restaurants
72(1)
Utility versus Pleasure
72(1)
Degree of Service Offered
72(1)
Time of Eating and Seat Turnover
73(3)
Square Foot Requirements
74(1)
Menu Price and Cost per Seat
74(1)
The Correct Number of Seats
75(1)
Advertising and Promotion Expenditures
76(1)
Labor Costs as a Percentage of Sales
77(1)
Planning Decisions that Relate to Concept Development
77(2)
Profitability
79(1)
The Mission Statement
79(1)
Concept and Location
80(1)
Criteria for Locating a Restaurant
81(12)
Location Criteria
81(1)
Some Restaurants Create Their Own Location
82(1)
Sources of Location Information
82(2)
Traffic Generators
84(1)
Knockout Criteria
84(1)
Other Location Criteria
85(1)
Suburban, Nook-and-Cranny, and Shopping Mall Locations
86(1)
Minimum Population Needed to Support a Concept
87(1)
Downtown versus Suburban
87(1)
Average Travel Time to Reach Restaurants
88(1)
Matching Location with Concept
88(1)
Restaurant Chain Location Specifications
88(1)
Takeover Locations
89(1)
Restaurant Topographical Surveys
90(2)
Cost of the Location
92(1)
Visibility and Accessiblity
92(1)
Design Criteria
92(1)
Location Information Checklist
93(3)
Summary
96(2)
Restaurant Business and Marketing Plans
98(26)
The Business Plan
99(3)
The Difference between Marketing and Sales
102(1)
Solving Customer Problems
103(1)
Marketing Planning and Strategy
103(1)
Market Assessment
104(1)
Market Demand
105(2)
Market Potential
106(1)
Market Segmentation, Target Market, and Positioning
106(1)
Marketing Mix---The Four Ps
107(14)
Place
107(2)
Product
109(3)
Price
112(3)
Promotion
115(6)
Olive Garden Marketing
121(1)
Summary
122(2)
Financing and Leasing
124(37)
Sufficient Capital
125(1)
Preparing for the Loan Application
126(15)
Budgeting
128(1)
Forecasting Sales
129(3)
Income Statement
132(1)
Budgeting Costs
133(1)
Gross Profit
133(1)
Controllable Expenses
133(1)
Uniform System of Accounts for Restaurants
134(2)
The Balance Sheet
136(1)
Preopening Expenses
137(1)
Cash Flow Budgeting
137(2)
Productivity Analysis and Cost Control
139(1)
Seat Turnover
139(2)
Securing a Loan
141(11)
Compare Interest Rates
141(1)
Real Interest Rates
141(1)
Loan Sources
142(1)
The Small Business Administration
143(4)
Stockpiling Credit
147(1)
Selling the Proposal
148(2)
Other Sources of Money
150(1)
Collateral
151(1)
Keeping the Loan Lines Open
152(1)
Avoiding Personal Liability
152(1)
Leasing
152(6)
Lease Costs
153(1)
Drawing Up a Lease
153(2)
Lease Terminology and Length
155(1)
Specifics of Most Restaurant Leases
156(1)
Fire Insurance
157(1)
What Is a Restaurant Worth?
158(1)
Summary
159(2)
Legal and Tax Matters
161(26)
What Business Entity Is Best?
162(5)
The Sole Proprietorship
163(1)
The Partnership
164(1)
The Restaurant as a Corporation
165(2)
Buy--Sell Agreement with Partners
167(1)
Legal Aspects of Doing Business
168(3)
Depreciation and Cash Flow
171(1)
Accelerated or Straight-Line Depreciation
172(1)
Retirement Tax Shelters
172(2)
The Rule of 72
173(1)
A Reasonable Return on Investment
173(1)
Business Expenses and Taxes
174(1)
Reminders
174(1)
Local, State, and Federal Taxes
175(1)
Federal Laws Governing Employment
176(5)
The Federal Wage and Hour Law (The Fair Labor Standards Act)
176(2)
Employee Information
178(1)
The Federal Equal Pay Act of 1963 and Federal Child Labor Laws
179(1)
Wage Garnishment Act
179(1)
The Age Discrimination in Employment Act
179(1)
The Employment Retirement Income Security Act
180(1)
Civil Rights Act of 1964
180(1)
Legal Aspects of Contract Services
181(1)
Complications in Discharging Employees
181(1)
Reporting Tips to the Internal Revenue Service
182(1)
Selling Liquor to Minors
182(1)
Time Off to Vote
182(1)
Wage and Hour Audits
183(1)
Interpretation and Clarification of Government Regulations
183(1)
Falls
184(1)
Summary
184(3)
The Menu
187(29)
Capability/Consistency
189(1)
Equipment
190(1)
Availability
190(1)
Price
190(3)
Factors in Pricing
191(1)
Menu Pricing Strategies
192(1)
Calculating Food Cost Percentage
192(1)
Nutritional Value
193(1)
Contribution Margin
194(1)
Flavor
195(1)
Accuracy in Menu
195(5)
Kids' Menus
200(1)
Menu Items
200(4)
Appetizers and Soups
202(1)
Salads
202(1)
Entrees
203(1)
Desserts
203(1)
Matching/Pairing
203(1)
Menu Types
204(1)
Lunch and Dinner Menus
205(1)
Degustation Menus
205(1)
Restaurants in Las Vegas Represent the Best Countrywide
205(3)
Menu Analysis
208(1)
Menu Design and Layout
209(4)
Standardized Recipes
213(1)
Summary
213(3)
Bar and Beverages
216(25)
Alcoholic Beverage Licenses
217(1)
How to Apply for a License
218(1)
Bar Layout and Design
219(2)
Placement of a Bar within a Restaurant
221(1)
The Speed Gun
222(1)
Glass Washing
223(1)
Bartenders
224(1)
A Basic Bar Inventory
224(1)
How to Select a Wine List
225(4)
Wines with Food
229(1)
Responsible Alcoholic Beverage Service
230(2)
Third-Party Liability
232(1)
Controls
232(7)
Controlling Losses
233(1)
99 Ways to Steal in a Restaurant or Bar
233(6)
Summary
239(2)
Food Purchasing
241(20)
A Food Purchasing System
241(10)
The Purchasing Cycle
247(1)
Who Sets Up the System? Who Operates It?
248(1)
Food Quality Standards
248(1)
Buying by Specification
248(1)
How Much Inventory?
248(2)
The Mechanics of Ordering
250(1)
Storage
250(1)
Types of Purchasing
251(3)
Buying from Full-Line Purveyors
251(2)
Co-op Buying
253(1)
Beware
253(1)
Buying Meat
254(1)
Buying Fresh Fruits and Vegetables
255(3)
USDA Wholesale Produce Grades
257(1)
Canned Fruits and Vegetables
257(1)
Selecting the Right Coffee
258(1)
Summary
258(3)
Planning and Equipping the Kitchen
261(24)
The Open Kitchen
264(2)
Kitchen Floor Coverings
266(2)
Kitchen Equipment
268(4)
Categories of Kitchen Equipment
268(1)
Select the Right Equipment
269(1)
Match Equipment with Menu and Production Schedule
270(1)
Total Cost versus Original Cost
271(1)
Select the Most Efficient Equipment for the People and Skills Available
271(1)
De-skilling the Job with Equipment
271(1)
Equipment Stars
272(9)
The Stove/Oven
272(1)
Deep-Frying Equipment
272(2)
Low-Temperature Ovens
274(1)
Forced-Air Convection Ovens
274(1)
Microwave Ovens
275(2)
Infrared Cooking Equipment
277(1)
Hot-Food Holding Tables
277(1)
Refrigerators and Freezers
277(1)
Ice Machines
278(1)
Pasta-Making Machines
279(1)
Other Specialty Cooking Equipment
279(1)
Evaporative Coolers
280(1)
Other Equipment
280(1)
Maintaining Kitchen Equipment
281(1)
Meeting with the Health Inspector
282(1)
Summary
283(2)
Restaurant Operations and Control
285(24)
Restaurant Operations
286(1)
Front of the House
287(4)
Control
291(4)
Liquor Control
295(2)
Controllable Expenses
297(1)
Labor Costs
298(5)
Guest Check Control
303(3)
Productivity Analysis and Cost Control
306(1)
Seat Turnover
307(1)
Summary
307(2)
Organization, Recruiting, and Staffing
309(33)
Task and Job Analysis
310(4)
Technical Tasks Vary with the Establishment
311(3)
Job Descriptions
314(2)
The Job Specification
314(1)
The Job Instruction Sheet
314(2)
Organizing People and Jobs
316(3)
Staffing the Restaurant
319(9)
Recruitment
319(2)
Preemployment Testing
321(1)
Interviewing
321(2)
Selection
323(2)
Employment of Minors
325(1)
Employment of Undocumented Aliens
326(1)
Employee Sources
327(1)
Civil Rights Laws
328(3)
Equal Employment Opportunity
328(1)
The Americans with Disabilities Act
329(1)
Hiring People Who Are Physically or Mentally Challenged
330(1)
AIDS
331(1)
Questions to Avoid on the Application Form and During the Interview
331(6)
Questions You Can Ask
332(4)
The Multiple Interview Approach
336(1)
Telephone References
336(1)
Careful Selection of Personnel
337(2)
Screening Out the Substance Abuser
339(1)
Preemption Physical and Drug Examinations
339(1)
Summary
339(3)
Employee Training and Development
342(22)
Orientation
343(1)
Training
344(2)
Part-Time Employees
346(1)
Training and Development
346(8)
Training Aids
348(1)
Combine Training with Development
348(1)
Slogans Help
349(1)
Step-by-Step Training
350(1)
Training Theory
351(3)
Methods for Training Employees
354(3)
Behavior Modeling
354(1)
Learner-Controlled Instruction
354(2)
The Manager as Coach
356(1)
Leadership
357(4)
Better Management Behavior
358(1)
Characteristics of Effective Managers
358(1)
Subtleties of Supervision
359(2)
Motivation through Part Ownership
361(1)
A Tipping Policy
361(1)
Summary
362(2)
Service and Guest Relations
364(18)
The Service Encounter
366(1)
Gamesmanship
367(1)
Greeters
368(1)
The Server as an Independent Businessperson
369(1)
Foodservice Teams
369(1)
Hard Sell versus Soft Sell
370(2)
Formality or Informality
372(1)
Setting the Table
373(1)
Taking the Order
373(1)
Magic Phrases
374(1)
The Servers' Viewpoint
375(1)
The Difficult Customer
376(3)
Strategies for Handling Complaints
376(2)
Teen Confrontations
378(1)
Service Personnel as a Family
379(1)
Greeter or Traffic Cop
379(1)
Tact: Always
380(1)
Summary
380(2)
Restaurant Technology
382(17)
Technology in the Restaurant Industry
383(14)
Back-of-the-House Technology
383(6)
Front-of-the-House Technology
389(8)
Guest Services and Web Sites
397(1)
Summary
397(2)
Glossary 399(8)
Index 407

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