9780135164808

Revel for The Prentice Hall Guide for College Writers -- Access Card

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  • ISBN13:

    9780135164808

  • ISBN10:

    013516480X

  • Edition: 12th
  • Format: Access Card
  • Copyright: 2019-01-02
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

NOTE: Revel is a fully digital delivery of Pearson content. This ISBN is for the standalone Revel access card. In addition to this access card, you will need a course invite link, provided by your instructor, to register for and use Revel.


Built for the new world of college writing, with research and writer’s purpose at the core

Today’s writing – and writing instruction – have changed well beyond digital and visual delivery of texts; dramatic changes also are found in all stages of the writing process. Revel The Prentice Hall Guide for College Writers, 12th Edition is built for the new world of college writing, where students are not only writers but also designers. 


While continuing its emphasis on finding and using authoritative materials, the 12th Edition also encourages students to become active researchers as they move from observing and investigating through more traditional academic research. The authors help students to see the full spectrum of primary and secondary research, including the array of technologies that can help them find, evaluate, reflect on, and synthesize their research into well-formed arguments. 


This revision continues to foster rhetorical awareness and asks students to consider purpose, audience, and genre every time they write. Its rhetorical emphasis, practical step-by-step approach, and consistent structure make this guide a highly teachable favorite.


Revel™ is Pearson’s newest way of delivering our respected content. Fully digital and highly engaging, Revel replaces the textbook and gives students everything they need for the course. Informed by extensive research on how people read, think, and learn, Revel is an interactive learning environment that enables students to read, practice, and study in one continuous experience — for less than the cost of a traditional textbook.


Author Biography

Stephen Reid graduated from Grinnell College with a degree in physics and from the University of Kansas with a Ph.D. in English literature. He taught literature and composition in the English department at Colorado State University for 43 years. Over those years, he taught basic and first-year composition as well as composition history and theory, and his literature courses included Western American Literature and Alaskan Literature. He is the author of several composition textbooks, including ten editions of The Prentice Hall Guide for College Writers and a composition reader, Purpose and Process . As writing program administrator for over 20 years, he helped hundreds of graduate teaching assistants learn to become confident and proficient writing teachers.


Dominic DelliCarpini is the Naylor Endowed Professor of Writing Studies at York College of Pennsylvania. He holds a B.A. from the University of Pennsylvania and an M.A. and Ph.D. from the Pennsylvania State University. Currently, he is dean for York College’s Center for Community Engagement and president of the National Council of Writing Program Administrators. He has also served on the Executive Board and as the national secretary for the Conference on College Composition and Communication. Before taking on his current role, he served York College for 5 years as chief academic officer, 13 years as writing program director, and 10 years as a secondary school teacher in Philadelphia. He continues to teach first-year and advanced composition courses, including technical writing, business writing, and rhetoric. 


His numerous articles and presentations examine writing program administration, undergraduate research, faculty development, and the role of writing as a tool for civic engagement. He has also authored or edited four textbooks for first-year composition, and he has served as a consultant for writing programs around the United States. For his work within the community of York, he has received the York College Professional Service Award, the York County Economic Alliance’s Spirit of York County Award for Community Engagement, and the 10,000 Friends of Pennsylvania Award. He serves on the Board of Trustees for the York County Community Foundation, the Cultural Alliance of York County, and the York Bar Foundation. He was recently appointed by Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf to his commission on public service, PennSERVE.

 

DelliCarpini’s collaboration with Stephen P. Reid of Colorado State University on The Prentice Hall Guide for College Writers  began with the 10th Edition of this well-established text. It is a testament to Dr. Reid’s work in developing this text that — in each new iteration — it continues to provide students with a rich rhetorical education and with the newest tools that writers need.


Table of Contents

I. THINGS WRITERS DO


1. Forming a Writer’s Habits of Mind 

Thinking Like a Writer: Key Habits of Mind 

Warming Up: Freewriting, Looping, and Reflecting 

Acting Like a Writer: Forming Good Habits of Practice 

Writer’s Rituals: Place, Time, and Tools 

Energy and Attitude 

Collecting Ideas: Thinking Broadly About Research 

Informal Writing: Finding Points of View

Writing Assignment: Multimedia Writing

Writing as a Team Sport: Collaborating with Others

Being Responsible: Writing Ethically

Writing Assignment: Writing Ethically


2. Situations, Purposes, and Processes for Writing

The Rhetorical Situation

Elements of the Rhetorical Situation

The Writer • The Occasion • Purpose • Audience • Context • Genre, Medium, and Style

Why the Rhetorical Situation Is Important

Purposes for Writing

Writer-Based Purposes

Subject- and Audience-Based Purposes

Combinations of Purposes

Formulating a Thesis

Audience

Audience Analysis

Design Thinking and the Writing Process

Design Thinking and Audience Analysis

Genre, Medium, and Style

Analyzing the Rhetorical Situation

Writing Assignment: Analyzing the Rhetorical Situation

Purpose, Audience, and Context in Personal Essays

“Why I Decided to Go to College” by Luz Ruiz

“What It’s Like Having an Eating Disorder the First Week of College” by Hannah Grice

“The Introvert’s Guide to the First Week of College” by Jessica McQuarrie

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Dimensions of the Writing Process

Collecting

Shaping and Drafting

Revising

The Whole Process

Writing Assignment

A Writing Process at Work: Collecting and Shaping

“Athletes and Education” by Neil H. Petrie

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignments

A Writing Process at Work: Drafting and Revising

Questions for Writing and Discussion


3. Reading as a Writer

Critical Reading Strategies

Double-Entry Log

Critical Rereading Guide

Reading Online Texts

Summarizing and Responding to an Essay

“Why We Still Need Feminism” by Casey Cavanaugh

Summarizing

Writing Assignment: Writing a Summary

Summary of “Why We Still Need Feminism”

Responding

Types of Responses • Kinds of Evidence

Writing Assignment: Writing a Response

Response to “Why We Still Need Feminism”

Rhetorical Reading and Analysis

The Rhetorical Situation

Rhetorical Analysis Versus Critical Reading

Rhetorical Appeals

Appeal to Reason and Logic (Logos) • Appeal to Character and Credibility (Ethos) • Appeal to Emotion (Pathos) • Combined Appeals

“Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions (Seneca Falls Resolution)” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton et al.

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Rhetorical Analysis Guide

Writing Assignments: Community Service, Visual Rhetoric

Tips for Transferring Skills to Other Courses and the Workplace

Using Critical Reading in Your Writing Processes

Choosing a Subject for Analyzing a Text

“Plagiarism in America” by Dudley Erskine Devlin

Collecting

Text Annotation

Reading Log

Shaping and Drafting

Paraphrasing and Quoting

Paraphrase • Direct Quotation

Avoiding Plagiarism

Sample Summary

Response Shaping

Analyzing • Agreeing/Disagreeing • Interpreting and Reflecting • Analyzing Rhetorically

Organizing Summary/Response and Rhetorical Analysis Essays

Revising

Guidelines for Revision

Using Rhetorical Analysis for Critical Reading

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignments: Applying What You Have Learned



4. Analyzing and Composing Multimedia Texts

Rhetorical Appeals in Multimedia Environments

Appeal to Reason (Logos)

Appeal to Emotion (Pathos)

Appeal to Character and Credibility (Ethos)

Combined Appeals in Multimedia Texts

The Components of Multimedia Texts

Analyzing Visual Components

Information Graphics

Analyzing Audio Components

Analyzing Video Components

Synthesizing

Question for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignments

Analyzing Multimedia in Context

“Coming Home” by Carolyn Kleiner Butler

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Tips for Transferring Skills to Other Courses and the Workplace

Working with Multimedia as a Reader and as a Writer/Designer

Writing to Analyze Multimedia Texts

Using Multimedia to Create or Enhance Your Own Text

Choosing a Subject

Collecting

Shaping and Drafting

“Eating with Peace and Joy” by Tess Pernin

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Shaping with Page Design

Shaping in Digital Platforms

Revising

Student Writing

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignments: Applying What You Have Learned


II. TECHNIQUES FOR COLLECTING AND STRUCTURING IDEAS


5. Observing and Remembering

Narration and Description: Techniques for Observing

Observing People

Observing Places

Techniques for Writing About Memories

Remembering People

Remembering Places

Remembering Events

Writing Assignments

“Just Ask. Then Keep Asking” by Lisa Randall

Combining Observing and Remembering Techniques

“César Chávez Saved My Life” by Daniel “Nane” Alejandrez

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignment

Tips for Transferring Skills to Other Courses and the Workplace

Choosing a Subject

Collecting

Brainstorming

Clustering

Freewriting and Looping

Shaping and Drafting

Multigenre and Multimedia

Chronological Order

Comparison/Contrast

Simile and Metaphor

Voice and Tone

Dialog

Title, Introduction, and Conclusion

Revising

Using Observing and Remembering in Storytelling

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignments: Applying What You Have Learned



6. Investigating

Investigating Prior Research

“Drivers on Cell Phones Are as Bad as Drunks”

Investigating a Person

“Richard Linklater: “It fit my personality to be collaborating with the unknown future” by Andrew O’Hehir

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Investigating an Event or Phenomenon

“ “Do You Understand What It Means to Be Hungry?” Food Insecurity on Campus and the Role of Higher Education Professionals” by Kate K. Diamond (University of Minnesota—Twin Cities) and Michael J. Stebleton, Ph.D. (University of Minnesota—Twin Cities)

Question for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignments

Tips for Transferring Skills to Other Courses and the Workplace

Choosing a Subject and a Genre

Genres for Reporting the Results of Investigations

Collecting

Asking Questions

Research Tips

Summarizing • Citing Sources in Your Text 

Doing Field Research

Conducting an Effective Interview • Writing Questionnaires

Shaping and Drafting

Inverted Pyramid

Chronological Order

Comparison and Contrast

Title, Introduction, Conclusion, and Graphics

Revising

Guidelines for Revision

Using Investigating to Inform

Writing Assignments: Applying What You Have Learned



7. Explaining

Explaining What: Definition

“FOMO and Social Media” by Caterina Fake

Explaining How: Process Analysis

Explaining Why: Causal Analysis

“How Baseball Explains Modern Racism” by David Sirota

Writing Assignments

“How to Take Control of Your Credit Cards” by Suze Orman

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignment

“How Male and Female Students Use Language Differently” by Deborah Tannen

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Tips for Transferring Skills to Other Courses and the Workplace

Choosing a Subject

Collecting

Questions

Focus on Definition • Focus on Process Analysis • Focus on Causal Analysis

Branching

Observing

Remembering

Reading

Investigating

Shaping and Drafting

Audience, Genre, and Medium

Research Tips

Definition and Classification

Example

Voice and Tone

Chronological Order and Process Analysis

Causal Analysis

Tips for Integrating Images

Introduction, Lead-In, Thesis, and Essay Map

Paragraph Transitions and Hooks

Body Paragraphs

Revising

Using Explaining to Help Readers Understand a Complex Topic

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignments: Applying What You Have Learned



8. Evaluating

Evaluating Commercial Products and Services 

“World Grills” by Ariel Rose 

Excerpt from “The 7 Best 3D Printers to Buy in 2018” by Patrick Hyde and Alex Williams 

Evaluating Works of Art 

Evaluating a Work of Art 

Writing Assignments 

Evaluating Performances 

“Selma”: Humanizing Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. by Ann Hornaday 

Questions for Writing and Discussion 

Tips for Transferring Skills to Other Courses and the Workplace 

Choosing a Subject 

Collecting 

Observing 

Remembering 

Reading 

Investigating 

Use the Library or the Internet • Gather Field Data

Shaping and Drafting 

Audience and Genre 

Analysis by Criteria 

Comparison and Contrast 

Chronological Order 8

Causal Analysis

Research Tips 

Title, Introduction, and Conclusion 

Revising 

Using Evaluating to Make a Judgment 

Questions for Writing and Discussion 

Writing Assignments: Applying What You Have Learned 


III. PURPOSES AND GENRES


9. Arguing

Claims for Written Argument

Claims of Fact or Definition

Claims About Cause and Effect

Claims About Value

Claims About Solutions or Policies

Appeals for Written Argument

Appeal to Reason (Logos)

Inductive Logic

Appeal to Character (Ethos)

Appeal to Emotion (Pathos)

Combined Appeals

Approaches to Argument

“The Argument Culture” by Deborah Tannen

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Rogerian Argument

The Toulmin Method of Argument

Example of a Toulmin Analysis • Using the Toulmin Model

Writing Assignment

Multigenre Casebook on New Media

“The Internet: A Clear and Present Danger?” by Cathleen A. Cleaver

“Social Networking Gets Most Online Time”

“Cyberbullying” by Jennifer Holladay

“Bullying as True Drama” by Danah Boyd and Alice Marwick

“Why Social Media May Not Be So Good for Democracy” by Gordon Hull

“Do Social Media Threaten Democracy?” by Bo Franklin

“Why You Can’t Cite Wikipedia in My Class” by Neil L. Waters

“Professors Should Embrace Wikipedia” by Mark Wilson

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Tips for Transferring Skills to Other Courses and the Workplace

Choosing a Subject

Collecting

Narrowing and Focusing Your Claim

Remembering

Observing

Investigating

Analyzing Statistics

Shaping and Drafting

Listing “Pro” and “Con” Arguments

Drawing a Circle of Alternative Positions

Organizing Arguments

Developing Arguments

Research Tips

Revising

Revising Fallacies in Logic

Using Argument to Seek Common Ground

Student Writing

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignments: Applying What You Have Learned



10. Problem Solving

Demonstrating That a Problem Exists

Proposing a Solution and Convincing Your Readers

“4 Mistakes I Made with My Student Loans and How You Can Avoid Them” by Nicole Callahan

Writing Assignment

Mini-Casebook on the Opioid Crisis

“All Scientific Hands on Deck” to End the Opioid Crisis by Nora Volkow and Francis Collins

“Fight the Opioid Epidemic with Science” by Bill Foster

“The Simple Solution to Fight the Opioid Epidemic” by Margaret Danilovich

“Tackling the Opioid Crisis with Compassion: New Ways to Avoid Use and Treatment” by Jason Doctor and Michael Menchine

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Tips for Transferring Skills to Other Courses and the Workplace

Choosing a Subject

Collecting

Identifying and Focusing on the Specific Problem

Demonstrating That the Problem Needs a Solution

Discovering Possible Solutions

Evaluating Possible Solutions

Convincing Your Readers

Answering Possible Objections to Your Proposal

Listing Possible Steps for Implementation

Observing

Remembering

Reading and Investigating

Research Tips

Shaping and Drafting

Genres for Problem Solving

Outlines for Problem Solving

Causal Analysis

Criteria Analysis

Chronological Order

Revising

Using Problem Solving to Present Solutions

Student Writing 

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignments: Applying What You Have Learned



11. Responding to Literature

Responding as a Reader

Responding as a Writer

Character

Plot

Narrative Point of View

Setting

Style

Theme

Writing Assignments

Two Kinds of Literature: Narrative and Poetry

Responding to Stories

“The Story of an Hour” by Kate Chopin

“Talking Wrong” by Patricia Smith

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Responding to Poetry

“I’m Nobody! Who are you?” by Emily Dickinson

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Tips for Transferring Skills to Other Courses and the Workplace

Choosing

Collecting

Shaping and Drafting

Evaluating

Arguing

Investigating Changes in Interpretation

Revising

Using Literary Analysis in Your Writing Processes

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignments: Applying What You Have Learned



12. Researching

Developing a Topic, Purpose, and Audience

Know Your Purpose

Accommodate Your Audience

Planning Research

Brainstorm Available Sources

Use Question Analysis

Types of Sources

General Reference Materials

Primary and Secondary Sources

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Field Research

Evaluating Sources: Relevance, Currency, Reliability

Evaluating Academic Journals

Evaluating Open Web Sources

Evaluating Wikis and Blogs

Tips for Transferring Skills to Other Courses and the Workplace

Researching: Writing Processes

Choosing: Narrowing and Focusing Your Topic

Collecting

Annotating Sources and Notetaking

Summarizing a Text

Recording Careful Bibliographic Notes

Rethinking and Revising Your Working Thesis

Shaping and Drafting Your Research Proposal

Questions for Shaping Your Research Proposal

Planning

Organizing

Drafting an Annotated Working Bibliography

Revising

Using a Proposal to Develop Your Researched Writing Processes

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignments: Applying What You Have Learned



13. Researched Writing

Writing a Working Thesis

Establishing Claims

Using Sources to Support Your Claims

Synthesizing Sources

Choose Sources Carefully • Link Source Information to Your Own Central Point • Synthesize Source Material Into Your Own Argument

Avoiding Plagiarism

Citing Sources Accurately

Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Using MLA or APA Citations

Introducing and Citing Sources

Edit Quotations When Necessary to Condense or Clarify

Tips for Transferring Skills to Other Courses and the Workplace

Shaping and Drafting

Questions for Shaping Your Researched Essay

Planning a Line of Reasoning

Developing a Working Outline

Revising

Documenting Sources: MLA

In-Text Documentation: MLA Style

Content or Supplementary Notes

Works Cited List: MLA Style

Print Periodicals: MLA Style • Print Books: MLA Style • Web Sources: MLA Style • Other Sources: MLA Style

Documenting Sources: APA

In-Text Documentation: APA Style

References List: APA Style

Periodicals: APA Style • Books: APA Style • Electronic and Internet Sources: APA Style • Other Sources: APA Style

Sample Student MLA Paper

Questions for Writing and Discussion

Writing Assignments: Applying What You Have Learned


APPENDIX: WRITING UNDER PRESSURE

Preparing for and Taking an Essay Exam

Know Your Audience

Analyze Key Terms

Make a Sketch Outline

Question for Writing and Discussion

Know the Material

Practice Timed Writing

Proofread and Edit

Sample Essay Questions and Responses


Handbook

How to Edit and Proofread

Proofreading Marks

Editing Symbols

Tips for Editing and Proofreading


Section 1: Review of Basic Sentence Elements

1A Sentence Structure

1B Nouns and Pronouns

1C Adjectives and Adverbs

1D Verbs

Principal Parts of Verbs

1E Phrases and Clauses

Phrases

Clauses

1F Articles, Prepositions, Interjections

Articles

Prepositions

Interjections


Section 2: Sentence Structure and Grammar

2A Fragments

2B Mixed Constructions and Faulty Predication

Mixed Constructions

Faulty Predication

2C Dangling Modifiers and Misplaced Modifiers

Dangling Modifiers

Misplaced Modifiers

2D Faulty Parallelism

2E Active and Passive Voice

Active Voice

Passive Voice

2F Nominals and Be Verbs

Nominals
Be Verbs

2G Subject-Verb Agreement

2H Verb Tense

2I Pronoun Agreement

2J Pronoun Reference


Section 3: Diction and Style

3A Vague Words

3B Wordiness

3C Clichés and Jargon

Clichés

Jargon

3D Sexist Language

3E Denotation and Connotation

3F Usage Glossary


Section 4: Punctuation and Mechanics

4A Sentence Punctuation

4B Comma Splices and Fused Sentences

4C Commas

Commas for Introductory Elements

Items in a Series

Nonrestrictive Elements

Unnecessary Commas

Coordinate Adjectives

Dialog

Addresses and Dates

4D Periods and Semicolons

Periods

Semicolons

4E Colons and Dashes

Colons

Dashes

4F Exclamation Points and Question Marks

Exclamation Points

Question Marks

4G Quotation Marks and Ellipses

Quotation Marks

Ellipsis Marks

Punctuation with Quotation Marks

4H Italics

4I Parentheses and Brackets

Parentheses

Brackets

4J Apostrophes and Hyphens

Apostrophes

Hyphens

4K Capitals and Numbers

Capitals

Numbers

Handbook Index


Index




THEMATIC CONTENTS

* Denotes an excerpt from a larger work.


Technology and Human Nature

• *Adam Richman, “Can Citizen Journalism Pick Up the Pieces?”

• Caterina Fake, “FOMO and Social Media”

• Cathleen A. Cleaver, “The Internet: A Clear and Present Danger?”

• Danah Boyd and Alice Marwick, “Bullying as True Drama”

• Jennifer Holladay, “Cyberbullying”

• Mark A. Wilson, “Professors Should Embrace Wikipedia”

• Multigenre Casebook on New Media 

• Neil L. Waters, “Why You Can’t Cite Wikipedia in My Class”

• University of Utah News Center, “Drivers on Cell Phones Are as Bad as Drunks”


Technology and Democracy

• *Adam Richman, “Can Citizen Journalism Pick Up the Pieces?”

• Bo Franklin, “Do Social Media Threaten Democracy?”

• Cathleen A. Cleaver, “The Internet: A Clear and Present Danger?

• Gordon Hull, “Why Social Media May Not Be So Good for Democracy”


The Impact of Science

• Bill Foster, “Fight the Opioid Epidemic with Science”

• Billy Amtmann, “Space Travel: The Newest Developments on the New Frontier” [student essay]

• Leah Miller, “Animal Testing Is Still Necessary” [student essay]

• *Maddie Drenkhan, Amber Moore, and Vikas Munjal, “A Proposal for Addressing the Opioid Crisis in Hocking County, Ohio” [student PowerPoint research presentation]

• Nora Volkow and Francis Collins, “All Scientific Hands on Deck”

• Paige Koch, “Investigating the Ebola Outbreak” [student essay]


Health and Mental Health Issues

• *Anne Wilson Schaef, from When Society Becomes an Addict

• *Daria J. Kuss and Mark D. Griffiths, “Social Networking and Addiction: Ten Lessons Learned”

• Jennifer Holladay, “Cyberbullying”

• *Kate K. Diamond and Michael J. Stebleton, “Do You Understand What It Means to Be Hungry?”

• *Maddie Drenkhan, Amber Moore, and Vikas Munjal, “A Proposal for Addressing the Opioid Crisis in Hocking County, Ohio” [student PowerPoint research presentation]

• Mini-Casebook on the Opioid Epidemic

• Paige Koch, “Investigating the Ebola Outbreak” [student essay]

• Utah News Center, “Drivers on Cell Phones Are as Bad as Drunks” 


Educational Issues

• Deborah Tannen, “How Male and Female Students Use Language Differently”

• Dudley Erskine Devlin, “Plagiarism in America”

• Jessica McQuarrie, “The Introvert’s Guide to the First Week of College”

• Hannah Grice, “What It’s Like Having an Eating Disorder the First Week of College”

• Luz Ruiz, “Why I Decided to Go to College: I Want to Be an Educated Mexican-American”

• Mark A. Wilson, “Professors Should Embrace Wikipedia”

• Neil H. Petrie, “Athletes and Education”

• Neil L. Waters, “Why You Can’t Cite Wikipedia in My Class”

• Stefanie Fuchs, “Reggio Emilia’s Advanced Educational System” [student essay]

• Suze Orman, “How to Take Control of Your Credit Cards”


Literacy and Language

• *Adam Richman, “Can Citizen Journalism Pick Up the Pieces?” 

• Cathleen A. Cleaver, “The Internet: A Clear and Present Danger?”

• Deborah Tannen, “The Argument Culture”

• Maira Mahmuda, “Are You Ready?”

• Suze Orman, “How to Take Control of Your Credit Cards”


Gender Roles

• Casey Cavanaugh, “Why We Still Need Feminism”

• Deborah Tannen, “How Male and Female Students Use Language Differently”

• *Dorothea Lange, “Migrant Agricultural Worker’s Family” and “Migrant Mother” [images]

• Elizabeth Cady Stanton, “Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions”

• Kate Chopin, “The Story of an Hour” [fiction]

• Patricia Smith, “Talking Wrong”

• Pencil Sketch of Elizabeth Cady Stanton


The Experience of Diversity

• Daniel “Nane” Alejandrez, “César Chávez Saved My Life”

• David Sirota, “How Baseball Explains Modern Racism”

• *Dorothea Lange, “Migrant Agricultural Worker’s Family” and “Migrant Mother” [images] 

• Jessica McQuarrie, “The Introvert’s Guide to the First Week of College”

• *Jeanne Wakatsuke, from Farewell to Manzanar

• Hannah Grice, “What It’s Like Having an Eating Disorder the First Week of College”

• Luz Ruiz, “Why I Decided to Go to College: I Want to Be an Educated Mexican-American”

• *Maira Mahmuda, “Interview” [student empathy interview]

• Patricia Smith, “Talking Wrong”


Making Aesthetic Judgments

• *Andrew O’Hehir, “It Fit My Personality to Be Collaborating with the Unknown Future”

• Ann Hornaday, “Selma: Humanizing Rev. Martin Luther King”

• *Dorothea Lange, “Migrant Mothers and Children in a Tent” and “Migrant Mother” [images] 

• Emily Dickinson, “I’m Nobody! Who are you?”

• Kate Chopin, “The Story of an Hour”

• Mural of César Chávez [image]

• Pat Russell, “Death: The Final Freedom” [student essay]


Addressing Social and Cultural Issues

• Carolyn Kleiner Butler, “Coming Home”

• Carrie Gingrich, “Learning about the Rwandan Genocide: Misconceptions and Film” [student research essay]

• Daniel “Nane” Alejandrez, “César Chávez Saved My Life”

• David Sirota, “How Baseball Explains Modern Racism”

• Deborah Tannen, “The Argument Culture”

• Dorothea Lange, “Migrant Agricultural Worker’s Family” and “Migrant Mother” [images] 

• Elizabeth Cady Stanton, “Declaration of Sentiments and Resolutions”

• *Kate K. Diamond and Michael J. Stebleton, “Do You Understand What It Means to Be Hungry?”

• Suze Orman, “How to Take Control of Your Credit Cards”

• Tess Pernin, “Eating with Peace and Joy”


Business and Consumer Issues

• Ariel Rose, “Review of World Grills”

• Billy Amtmann, “Space Travel: The Newest Developments on the New Frontier” [student essay]

• *Jennifer Owrutsky, Emily Greeninger, Kim Starke, and Danielle Gemperline, “Recommendations for Improving our Student-Run Business” [student PowerPoint presentation]

• *Patrick Hyde and Alex Williams, “The 7 Best 3D Printers to Buy in 2018”

• Suze Orman, “How to Take Control of Your Credit Cards” 

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