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9780135238790

REVEL for Writing Today Plus The Writer's Handbook -- Access Code Card

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  • ISBN13:

    9780135238790

  • ISBN10:

    013523879X

  • Edition: 4th
  • Format: Nonspecific Binding
  • Copyright: 2018-08-01
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

For courses in English Composition.

 

Practical writing skills for composing in the real world

Revel™ Writing Today is an accessible book that fits the way people today read and learn. Its chunked writing style; eye-catching design; and focus on writing genres, strategies, and processes set you up for success in your college courses, your career, and your civic life.

 

The 4th Edition marks a turning point in this highly successful series. Authors Richard Johnson-Sheehan and Charles Paine have made reflection — or discovering why we think the way we doone of the central concepts of the revision. As you explore this, you’ll become intellectually stronger, more aware, more versatile, and more resilient.

 

Revel is Pearson’s newest way of delivering our respected content. Fully digital and highly engaging, Revel replaces the textbook and gives students everything they need for the course. Informed by extensive research on how people read, think, and learn, Revel is an interactive learning environment that enables students to read, practice, and study in one continuous experience — for less than the cost of a traditional textbook.

 

This product is a part of the Revel Plus One program and includes access to Johnson-Sheehan/Paine,  Writing Today  and Faigley,  The Writer’s Handbook  within a single Revel course. 


NOTE: Revel is a fully digital delivery of Pearson content. This ISBN is for the standalone Revel access card. In addition to this access card, you will need a course invite link, provided by your instructor, to register for and use Revel.

Author Biography

Richard Johnson-Sheehan is a Professor of Rhetoric and Composition at Purdue University. There, he has directed the Introductory Composition program and served as the Director of the Purdue Writing Lab and the Purdue OWL. He teaches a variety of courses in composition, professional writing, medical writing, environmental writing, and writing program administration, as well as classical rhetoric and the rhetoric of science. He has also published widely in these areas. 


Johnson-Sheehan’s books on writing include Argument Today, coauthored by Charles Paine; Technical Communication Today, now in its fifth edition; and Writing Proposals, now in its second edition. He was awarded the 2008 Fellow of the Association of Teachers of Technical Writing. In 2017, he was awarded the J.R. Gould Award for Excellence in Teaching by the Society for Technical Communication.



Charles Paine is a Professor of English at the University of New Mexico, where he directs the Core Writing and the Rhetoric and Writing programs. He teaches first-year composition and courses in writing pedagogy, the history of rhetoric and composition, and many other areas. His published books span a variety of topics in rhetoric and composition, including The Resistant Writer (a history of composition studies), Teaching with Student Texts (a coedited collection of essays on teaching writing), and Argument Today (an argument-based textbook). 


An active member of the Council of Writing Program Administrators (WPA), he has served on its Executive Board and as coleader of the WPA Summer Conference Workshop. He cofounded and coordinates the Consortium for the Study of Writing in College, a joint effort of the National Survey of Student Engagement and the Council of Writing Program Administrators. The Consortium conducts general research into the ways that undergraduate writing can lead to enhanced learning, engagement, and other gains related to student success.

Table of Contents

Preface

About the Authors

 


PART 1: GETTING STARTED 


1. Writing and Genres 

What Are Genres? 

Using Genres to Write Successfully 

    Genres in Movies 

    Writing with Genres

Genres and the Writing Process 

    Using a Writing Process 

    Using Genre as a Guiding Concept 

Transfer: Using Genres in College and in Your Career 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Genres 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This 



2. Topic, Angle, Purpose 

Topic: What Am I Writing About? 

Angle: What Is New About the Topic?

    What Has Changed That Makes This Topic Interesting Right Now? 

    What Unique Experiences, Expertise, or Knowledge Do I Have About This Topic? 

Purpose: What Do I Want to Accomplish?

    Are You Informing or Persuading? 

Thesis Statement (Main Claim) 

Choosing the Appropriate Genre 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Topic, Angle, Purpose 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



3. Readers, Contexts, and Rhetorical Situations 

Profiling Readers 

    A Brief Reader Profile 

    An Extended Reader Profile 

    Using a Reader Analysis Worksheet 

Analyzing the Context 

    Place 

    Medium 

    Social and Political Influences 

Discourse Communities and the Rhetorical Situation 

 

Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Readers, Contexts, and Rhetorical Situations 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



4. Reading Critically, Thinking Analytically 

Looking Through and Looking At a Text 

    Looking Through a Text 

    Looking At a Text 

Reading Critically: Seven Strategies 

    Strategy 1: Preview the Text 

    Strategy 2: Play the Believing and Doubting Game 

    Strategy 3: Annotate the Text 

    Strategy 4: Analyze the Proofs in the Text 

    Strategy 5: Contextualize the Text 

    Strategy 6: Analyze Your Own Assumptions and Beliefs 

    Strategy 7: Respond to the Text 

Using Critical Reading to Strengthen Your Writing 

    Responding to a Text: Evaluating What Others Have Written 

    Responding with a Text’s Positions, Terms, and Ideas: Using What Others Have Written 

 

Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Reading Critically, Thinking Analytically 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



5. Reflecting Critically, Starting Your Portfolio 

Using Critical Reflection to Strengthen Your Writing 

    Identify Your Strengths 

    Strengthen Your Versatility 

    Become More Independent 

Reflecting Critically: Three Strategies 

    Strategy 1: Look Backward to Your Prior Experiences 

    Strategy 2: Look Inward at the Choices You Made 

    Strategy 3: Look Forward to the Future 

Writing Your Critical Reflection 

    Introduction: Start the Story 

    The Body: Evaluate and Resolve the Conflict 

    Conclusion: Reveal What You Learned 

Using a Portfolio for Reflection 

    Step 1: Collect Your Work into an Archive 

    Step 2: Select the Best Artifacts for Your Portfolio 

    Step 3: Reflect on Your Work 

    Step 4: Present Your Materials 

    Creating an E-Portfolio 

Creating a Starter Résumé 

 

Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Reflecting Critically, Starting Your Portfolio  

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



PART 2: USING GENRES TO EXPRESS IDEAS


6. Memoirs 

At-A-Glance: Memoirs 

One Student’s Work: Nathan Peterman, “I Haven’t Been Back Since”


Inventing Your Memoir’s Content 

    Inquiring: Finding an Interesting Topic 

    Inquiring: Finding Out What You Already Know 

    Researching: Finding Out What Others Know 

Organizing and Drafting Your Memoir 

    Setting the Scene in Rich Detail 

    Main Point or Thesis 

    Describing the Complication 

    Evaluating and Resolving the Complication 

    Concluding with a Point–an Implied Thesis 

Choosing an Appropriate Style 

    Evoking an Appropriate Tone or Voice

    Using Dialogue

Designing Your Memoir 


Microgenre: The Literacy Narrative 

Frederick Douglass, From Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass


Quick Start Guide 

Readings 

    Eliza Kennedy, “When an Open Relationship Comes with a Price”

    Thaddeus Gunn, “Slapstick”


Activities for Memoirs 

Talk About This

Try This Out 

Explore This

Write This



7. Profiles 

At-A-Glance: Profiles 

One Student’s Work: Ebony James, “Neil deGrasse Tyson: Sexy Astrophysicist and Defender of Science”


Inventing Your Profile’s Content 

    Inquiring: Finding Out What You Already Know 

    Researching: Finding Out What Others Know 

Organizing and Drafting Your Profile 

    The Introduction 

    The Body 

    The Conclusion 

Choosing an Appropriate Style 

Designing Your Profile 


Microgenre: The Portrait 

Hannah Giorgis, “Beyoncé Brought the Feminine Divine to the Grammys” 


Quick Start Guide 

Readings 

    Andrew Anthony, “Ellen DeGeneres: Darling of Both Middle America and the Coasts” 

    Sharon S. Smith, PhD, Mary Ellen O’Toole, PhD, and Robert D. Hare, PhD, “The Predator: When the Stalker Is a Psychopath” 


Activities for Profiles 

Talk About This

Try This Out 

Explore This

Write This



8. Reviews 

At-A-Glance: Reviews 

One Student’s Work: Talia Raoufpur, “Despite Questionable Quality, Fifty Shades Resonates with Audiences” 


Inventing Your Review’s Content 

    Inquiring: Discovering Common Expectations 

    Researching: Gathering Background Information 

    Researching: Go Experience It 

Organizing and Drafting Your Review 

    The Introduction 

    Description or Summary of the Subject 

    Discussion of Strengths and Shortcomings 

    Conclusion 

Choosing an Appropriate Style 

    Use Plenty of Detail 

    Set the Appropriate Tone 

    Change the Pace 

Designing Your Review 


Microgenre: The Rave/The Slam 

Linda Holmes, “La La Land Review” 


Quick Start Guide 

Readings 

    Wesley Lovell, “Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them” 

    Brian Reinhart, “Shake Shack Makes a Good Burger–and a Good Metaphor for Dallas Dining” 


Activities for Reviews 

Talk About This

Try This Out 

Explore This

Write This 



9. Literary Analyses 

At-A-Glance: Literary Analyses 

One Student’s Work: Jeremy Foote, “Speed That Kills: The Role of Technology in Kate Chopin’s ‘The Story of an Hour’” 


Inventing Your Literary Analysis’s Content 

    Read, Reread, Explore 

    Inquiring: What’s Interesting Here? 

    Researching: What Background Do You Need? 

Organizing and Drafting Your Literary Analysis 

    The Introduction: Establish Your Interpretive Question 

    The Body: Summarize, Interpret, Support 

    The Conclusion: Restate Your Thesis 

Choosing an Appropriate Style 

    Use the “Literary Present” Tense 

    Integrate Quoted Text 

    Move Beyond Personal Response 

Designing Your Literary Analysis 


Microgenre: The Reading Response 

Mateo Hernandez, A Student’s Reading Response to Paul Laurence Dunbar’s “We Wear the Mask” 


Quick Start Guide 

Readings 

    Kate Chopin, “The Story of an Hour” 

    S. Selina Jamal, “Emotion in ‘The Story of an Hour’” 


Activities for Literary Analyses

Talk About This

Try This Out 

Explore This

Write This 



10. Rhetorical Analyses 

At-A-Glance: Rhetorical Analyses 

One Student’s Work: Sara Kelley, “The Rhetoric of Lincoln’s ‘Gettysburg Address’” 


Inventing Your Rhetorical Analysis’s Content 

    Inquiring: Highlight Uses of Proofs 

    Researching: Finding Background Information 

Organizing and Drafting Your Rhetorical Analysis 

    The Introduction 

    Explanation of Rhetorical Concepts 

    Provide Historical Context and Summary 

    Analysis of the Text 

    The Conclusion 

Choosing an Appropriate Style 

Designing Your Rhetorical Analysis 


Microgenre: The Ad Critique 

Sam Parker, “Why I Love H&M’s Latest Ad” 


Quick Start Guide 

Readings 

    Julie Sedivy, “Donald Trump Talks Like a Woman” 

    Keith Amaral, “An Analysis of Jim Valvano’s ‘93 ESPY Awards Speech” 


Activities for Rhetorical Analyses 

Talk About This

Try This Out 

Explore This

Write This 



11. Commentaries (Argument) 

At-A-Glance: Commentaries 

One Student’s Work: Rachel Loos, “Recognizing Diversity in Mental Illness” (Argument) 


Inventing Your Commentary’s Content 

    Inquiring: Finding Out What You Already Know 

    Researching: Finding Out What Others Know 

Organizing and Drafting Your Commentary 

    The Introduction 

    Explain the Current Event or Issue 

    Support Your Position (Argument) 

    Clarify Your Position (Argument) 

    The Conclusion 

Choosing an Appropriate Style 

    Get into Character 

    Imitate a Well-Known Writer 

    Match Your Tone to Your Readers’ Expectations 

    Use Analogies, Similes, and Metaphors 

Designing Your Commentary 


Microgenre: Letter to the Editor/Online Comment (Argument) 

Kayla Behnke, “As Gun Violence Escalates, the Need for Campus Carry Grows” 


Quick Start Guide 

Readings 

    Greg Hampikian, “When May I Shoot a Student?” (Argument) 

    Edwin Lyngar, “We’re All ShamWow Schemers Now” (Argument) 


Activities for Commentaries 

Talk About This

Try This Out 

Explore This

Write This

 


12. Arguments (Argument) 

At-A-Glance: Arguments 

One Student’s Work: Bryee Wilson, “Millennials Must Become More Politically Active” (Argument) 


Inventing Your Argument’s Content 

    Inquiring: Identifying Your Topic 

    Inquiring: Identifying Points of Contention (Argument) 

    Researching: Finding Out What Others Believe and Why 

Organizing and Drafting Your Argument 

    The Introduction 

    Summary and Limitations of Opposing Positions (Argument) 

    Your Understanding of the Issue 

    Reasons Your Understanding Is Stronger 

    Conclusion 

Choosing an Appropriate Style 

    Use Plain Style to Describe the Opposing Positions 

    Use Similes, Metaphors, and Analogies When Describing Your Position 

    Use Top-Down Paragraphs 

    Define Unfamiliar Terms 

Designing Your Argument 


Microgenre: The Rebuttal (Argument) 

Michele Waslin, “Robots, Not Immigrants, Are Replacing U.S. Manufacturing Workers” 


Quick Start Guide 

Readings 

    Ryan Anderson, “The Social Costs of Abandoning the Meaning of Marriage” (Argument) 

    Sean McElwee, “The Case for Censoring Hate Speech” (Argument) 


Activities for Arguments 

Talk About This

Try This Out 

Explore This

Write This



13. Proposals (Argument) 

At-A-Glance: Proposals 

One Student Group’s Work: Kerry Douglass, “Campus Illumination: An Implementation Strategy for Sustainable Exterior Lighting” 


Inventing Your Proposal’s Content 

    Inquiring: Defining the Problem 

    Inquiring: Analyzing the Problem 

    Researching: Gathering Information and Sources 

Inquiring: Planning to Solve the Problem 

Organizing and Drafting Your Proposal 

    The Introduction 

    Description of the Problem, Its Causes, and Its Effects 

    Description of Your Plan 

    Discussing the Costs and Benefits of Your Plan 

    The Conclusion 

Choosing an Appropriate Style 

Designing Your Proposal 


Microgenre: The Pitch 

Hans Fex, “Mini Museum” 


Quick Start Guide 

Readings 

    Haje Jan Kemps, “Solving Twitter‘s Abuse Problem” (Argument) 

    Alissa Walker, “Ban Cars’” (Argument) 


Activities for Proposals 

Talk About This

Try This Out 

Explore This

Write This

 


14. Formal Reports 

At-A-Glance: Formal Reports 

One Student Group’s Work: Kaisa Lee and Jamie Koss, “College Students’ Attitudes on the Causes of Infidelity” 


Inventing Your Report’s Content 

    Inquiring: Finding Out What You Already Know 

    Researching: Creating a Research Plan 

    Researching: Gathering Sources and Revisiting Your Hypothesis 

Organizing and Drafting Your Report 

    Executive Summary or Abstract 

    Introduction 

    Methods Section 

    Findings or Results Section 

    Discussion Section 

    Conclusion/Recommendations 

    References or Works Cited 

    Appendices 

Choosing an Appropriate Style 

Designing Your Report 


Microgenre: The Explainer 

Mark Fahey, “The Herd Outsider’s Guide to the Brony Phenomenon” 


Quick Start Guide 

Readings 

    Andrew Gelman and George A. Romero, “How Many Zombies Do You Know? Using Indirect Survey Methods to Measure Alien Attacks and Outbreaks of the Undead” (APA) 


    Nicholas Freudenberg et al., “Food Insecurity at CUNY: Results from a Survey of CUNY Undergraduate Students” (APA) 


Activities for Formal Reports 

Talk About This

Try This Out 

Explore This

Write This



15. Research Papers 

At-A-Glance: Research Papers 

One Student’s Work: Katelyn Turnbow, “Lives Not Worth the Money?” (MLA) 

Inventing Your Research Paper’s Content 

    Inquiring: Defining Your Topic, Angle, Purpose 

    Researching: Finding Out What Others Know 

Organizing and Drafting Your Research Paper 

    The Introduction 

    The Body 

    The Conclusion 

    Works Cited or References 

Choosing an Appropriate Style 

Designing Your Research Paper 


Microgenre: The Annotated Bibliography 

Sara Rodriguez, “Annotated Bibliography: The Fog of Revolution” (MLA) 


Quick Start Guide 

Readings 

    Teodora Stoica, “How Video Games Unwittingly Train the Brain to Justify Killing” (APA) 

    

    Sophie Gullett, “Popular Psychology and the Public Image: How Freud Still Manages to Give Us a Bad Name 100 Years Later” (APA) 


Activities for Research Papers 

Talk About This

Try This Out 

Explore This

Write This



PART 3: DEVELOPING A WRITING PROCESS 


16. Inventing Ideas and Prewriting 

Prewriting 

    Concept Mapping 

    Freewriting 

    Brainstorming or Listing 

    Storyboarding 

Using Heuristics 

    Asking the Journalist’s Questions 

    Using the Five Senses 

    Investigating Logos, Ethos, Pathos (Argument) 

    Cubing 

Exploratory Writing 

    Journaling, Blogging, or Microblogging 

    Writing an Exploratory Draft 

    Exploring with Presentation Software 

Taking Time to Invent and Prewrite 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Inventing Ideas and Prewriting 

Talk About This

Try This Out 

Explore This

Write This


17. Organizing and Drafting

Sketching Out Your Paper’s Organization

    Using the Genre to Create a Basic Outline  

    Filling Out Your Outline

Drafting Your Introduction: Tell Them What You’re Going to Tell Them 

    Five Introductory Moves 

    Using a Grabber to Start Your Introduction 

    Using a Lead to Draw in the Readers 

    When Should You Draft Your Introduction? 

Drafting the Body of Your Paper: Tell Them

    Overcoming Writer’s Block 

Drafting Your Conclusion: Tell Them What You Told Them 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Organizing and Drafting  

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



18. Choosing a Style

Writing in Plain Style 

    Guideline 1: Clarify Who or What the Sentence Is About 

    Guideline 2: Make the “Doer” the Subject of the Sentence 

    Guideline 3: Put the Subject Early in the Sentence 

    Guideline 4: State the Action in the Verb 

    Guideline 5: Eliminate Nominalizations 

    Guideline 6: Boil Down the Prepositional Phrases 

    Guideline 7: Eliminate Redundancies 

    Guideline 8: Use Sentences That Are Breathing Length 

Establishing Your Voice 

    Set a Specific Tone 

    Get into Character 

    Imitate Other Writers

Writing Descriptively with Figures and Tropes 

    Use Similes and Analogies 

    Use Metaphors 

    Use Personification 

    Use Onomatopoeia 

    Use Alliteration and Assonance 

    Improving Your Writing Style 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Choosing a Style 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



19. Designing

Design Principle 1: Balance 

    Balancing a Page 

Design Principle 2: Alignment 

Design Principle 3: Grouping 

Design Principle 4: Consistency 

    Choosing Typefaces 

    Using Headings Consistently 

Design Principle 5: Contrast 

Using Photography and Images 

Using Graphs and Charts 

    Creating a Graph or Chart 

    Choosing the Appropriate Graph or Chart 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Designing 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



20. Revising and Editing 

Level 1: Global Revision 

    Challenge Your Draft’s Topic, Angle, and Purpose 

    Think About Your Readers (Again) and the Context 

Level 2: Substantive Editing 

    Determine Whether You Have Enough Information (or Too Much) 

    Reorganize Your Work to Better Use the Genre 

    Look for Ways to Improve the Design 

    Ask Someone Else to Read Your Work 

Level 3: Copyediting 

    Review Your Title and Headings 

    Edit Paragraphs to Make Them Concise and Consistent 

    Revise Sentences to Make Them Clearer 

    Revise Sentences to Make Them More Descriptive 

Level 4: Proofreading 

    Read Your Writing Out Loud 

    Read Your Draft Backwards 

    Read a Printed Copy of Your Work 

    Know Your Grammatical Weaknesses 

    Use Your Spellchecker and Grammar Checker 

    Peer Review: Asking for Advice 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Revising and Editing 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



PART 4: STRATEGIES FOR SHAPING IDEAS


21. Developing Paragraphs and Sections 

Creating a Basic Paragraph 

    Transition or Transitional Sentence (Optional) 

    Topic Sentence (Needed) 

    Support Sentences (Needed) 

    Point Sentence (Optional) 

Getting Paragraphs to Flow (Cohesion) 

    Subject Alignment in Paragraphs 

    Given-New in Paragraphs 

Organizing a Section 

    Opening, Body, Closing 

    Organizational Patterns for Sections 

    Using Headings in Sections 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Developing Paragraphs and Sections 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



22. Using Basic Rhetorical Patterns

Narrative 

Description 

    Describing with the Senses 

    Describing with Similes, Metaphors, and Onomatopoeia 

Definition 

Classification 

    Step 1: List Everything That Fits into the Whole Class 

    Step 2: Decide on a Principle of Classification 

    Step 3: Sort into Major and Minor Groups 

Cause and Effect 

Comparison and Contrast 

Combining Rhetorical Patterns 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Using Basic Rhetorical Patterns 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



23. Using Argumentative Strategies (Argument) 

What Is Arguable? 

    Arguable Claims 

    Four Sources of Arguable Claims 

Using Reason, Authority, and Emotion 

    Reason (Logos

    Authority (Ethos

    Emotion (Pathos

Avoiding Logical Fallacies 

Rebuttals and Refutations 

    Summarize Your Opponents’ Position Objectively 

    Recognize When the Opposing Position May Be Valid 

    Concede Some of the Opposing Points 

    Refute or Absorb Your Opponents’ Major Points 

    Qualify Your Claims 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Using Argumentative Strategies 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



24. Collaborating and Peer Response

Working Successfully in Groups 

Working Successfully in Teams 

     Planning the Project 

     Forming: Setting Goals, Getting Organized 

     Storming: Managing Conflict 

     Norming: Getting Down to Work 

     Performing: Working as a Team 

Using Peer Response to Improve Your Writing 

     Types of Peer Response and Document Cycling 

     Using Digital Tools for Peer Review 

     Responding Helpfully During Peer Response 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Collaborating and Peer Response 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



PART 5: DOING RESEARCH


25.  Starting Your Research

Starting Your Research Process 

    Step 1: Define Your Research Question 

    Step 2: Develop a Working Thesis 

    Step 3: Devise a Research Plan 

Doing Start-Up Research 

Assessing a Source’s Reliability 

    Is the Source Credible? 

    Is the Source Up to Date? 

    How Biased Are the Author and the Publisher? 

    Can You Verify the Evidence in the Source? 

    How Biased Are You? 

Managing Your Research Process 

    Finalizing a Research Schedule 

    Starting Your Bibliography File 

Following and Modifying Your Research Plan 

    When Things Don’t Go as Expected 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Starting Your Research 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



26.  Finding Sources and Collecting Evidence 

Using Primary and Secondary Sources 

Evaluating Sources with Triangulation 

Finding Electronic and Online Sources 

    Using Internet Search Engines 

    Using the Internet Cautiously 

    Using Documentaries and Television/Radio Broadcasts 

    Using Wikis, Blogs, and Podcasts 

Finding Print Sources 

    Locating Books at Your Library 

    Finding Articles at Your Library 

Using Empirical Sources 

    Interviewing People 

    Using an Informal Survey 

    Doing Field Observations 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Finding Sources and Collecting Evidence 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This 



27.  Citing, Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing Sources 

Citing 

Quoting 

    Brief Quotations 

    Long Quotations 

Paraphrasing and Summarizing 

    Paraphrasing 

    Summarizing 

Framing Quotes, Paraphrases, and Summaries 

Avoiding Plagiarism 

    Academic Dishonesty 

    Patchwriting 

    Ideas and Words Taken without Attribution 

    The Real Problem with Plagiarism 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Citing, Quoting, Paraphrasing, and Summarizing Sources 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



28.  Using MLA Style

Parenthetical Citations 

    When the Author’s Name Appears in the Sentence 

    Citing More Than One Source in the Same Sentence 

    Citing a Source Multiple Times 

    Citing a Source with No Page Numbers 

    Other Parenthetical References 

Preparing the List of Works Cited 

    Including More Than One Source from an Author 

    Citing a Source that Appears in Another Source (Containers) 

    Formatting a List of Works Cited 

Citing Sources in the List of Works Cited 

    Citing Books and Other Nonperiodical Publications 

    Citing Journals, Magazines, and Other Periodicals 

    Citing Web Publications 

    Citing Other Kinds of Sources 


A Student’s MLA-Style Research Paper: Brian Naidus, “A Whole New World: A Background on the Life of the Freshwater Shark” 



29.  Using APA Style

Parenthetical Citations 

    When the Author’s Name Appears in the Sentence 

    Citing More Than One Source in the Same Sentence 

    Citing a Source Multiple Times 

    Other Parenthetical References 

Preparing the List of References 

    Formatting a List of References in APA Style 

Citing Sources in the List of References 

    Citing Books and Other Nonperiodical Publications 

    Citing Journals, Magazines, and Other Periodicals 

    Citing Web Publications 

    Citing Other Kinds of Sources 


A Student’s APA-Style Research Paper: Austin Duus, “Assortive Mating and Income Inequality” 



PART 6: GETTING YOUR IDEAS OUT THERE


30.  Writing with Social Networking

    Is This Writing? 

Creating a Social Networking Site 

    Choose the Best Site for You 

    Be Selective About Your “Friends” 

    Update Your Profile Regularly 

Starting Your Own Blog 

    Choose a Host Site for Your Blog 

    Writing and Updating Your Blog 

Writing Articles for Wikis 

    Write the Article 

    Add Your Article to the Wiki 

Putting Videos and Podcasts on the Internet 

    Write the Script 

    Edit Your Work 

    Upload Your Video or Podcast 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Writing with Social Networking 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



31.  Succeeding on Written Exams and Assessments

Step 1: Prepare for the Exam 

    Meet with Study Groups 

    Ask Your Professor About the Exam 

    Pay Attention to Themes and Key Concepts 

    For Standardized Assessments, Study the Rubrics or Scoring Guidelines 

    Create Your Own Questions and Rehearse Possible Answers 

Step 2: Start Your Written Exam 

    Review the Exam Quickly to Gain an Overall Picture 

    Budget Your Time 

Step 3: Answer the Questions 

    Organize Your Answer 

Step 4: Complete the Written Exam 

One Student’s Written Exam 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Succeeding on Written Exams and Assessments 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This



32.  Presenting Your Work

Step 1: Plan Your Presentation 

    Ask a Few Key Questions to Get Started 

    Choose the Appropriate Presentation Technology 

    Allot Your Time 

Step 2: Organize Your Ideas 

    Introduction: Tell Them What You’re Going to Tell Them 

    The Body of Your Talk: Tell Them 

Conclusion: Tell Them What You Told Them 

    Question and Answer 

Step 3: Design Your Visual Aids 

    Format Your Slides 

Step 4: Prepare Your Delivery 

    Body Language 

    Voice and Tone 

Step 5: Practice and Rehearse 

    Practice, Practice, Practice 

    Rehearse, Rehearse, Rehearse 


Quick Start Guide 


Activities for Presenting Your Work 

Talk About This 

Try This Out 

Write This 



PART 7: THEMATIC ANTHOLOGY OF READINGS


33.  College and a New Life

Heirloom 

    Victoria Chiu


The College Hazing That Changed My Life 

    Thomas Rogers


Is College Worth It? 

    Jake Garner 


How to Fix Grade Inflation at Harvard 

    Samuel Goldman 


Freshman Fifteen: Fact or Fiction? 

    Jennifer A. Carithers-Thomas, Shelley H. Bradford, Christopher M. Keshock, Steven F. Pugh



34.  Identity and Human Nature

The End of Identity Politics 

    Victoria Davis Hanson 


Moonlight Chronicles Discovering One’s Sexual Identity in the Worst of Circumstances 

    Nsenga K. Burton, PhD 


A Modest Proposal 

    Jonathan Swift 


The NSDUH Report: Major Depressive Episode Among Full-Time College Students and Other Young Adults, Aged 18 to 22 



35.  Culture and Entertainment

Why We Crave Horror Movies 

    Stephen King 


Resident Evil 7: It’s a Screaming Good Time 

    Daniel Howley 


Ethical Chic: How Women Can Change the Fashion Industry 

    Elizabeth Schaeffer Brown 


Finding the Glass Slipper: A Feminist Analysis of the Disney Princess Films 

    Kathryn Buckingham 


Neil Patrick Harris’s Series of Fortunate Events 

    Kevin Fallon



36.  Place and Environment 

Hot for Creature 

    Eric Willis 


The Courage of Turtles 

    Edward Hoagland


Nature Writing in America: Criticism through Imagery 

    Adam Regn Arvidson 


Forget Shorter Showers 

    Derrick Jensen



37.  Health and Safety

The Serial Rapist Is Not Who You Think 

    Tim Madigan 


Do Cell Phones Cause Cancer? 

    Reynard Loki 


After Own Victory, Counselor Helps Others Beat Heroin 

    Kelly Glista 


Women’s Rights Are Human Rights 

    Hillary Rodham Clinton



38.  Science and Technology

Taking on Creationism: Which Arguments and Evidence Counter Pseudoscience?

    Mark Greener 


Darwin’s Paradigm Shift 

    Tim Berra, PhD 


We’ve Been Waiting for Hidden Figures: The Importance of Representation in Media

    Austin S. Harris 


Drones in U.S. Airspace: Principles for Governance 

    Paul Rosenzweig, Steven P. Bucci, PhD, Charles D. Stimson, and James Jay Carafano, PhD



PART 8: HANDBOOK

1. Sentences 

2. Verbs 

3. Pronouns 

4. Style 

5. Punctuation, Mechanics, and Spelling 


Appendix: Readings Arranged by Theme 

Credits 

Index  

Rewards Program

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