9781911454922

The Rise of Socialist Fiction 1880-1914

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781911454922

  • ISBN10:

    1911454927

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2018-07-31
  • Publisher: Edward Everett Root
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Summary

Leading scholars combine here a sustained attempt to trace the growth of socialist fiction in the crucial period of the formation of the modern British labour movement. While the importance of the long-neglected literary tradition is now recognised, no other studies have been as comprehensive as this collection. The essays here go beyond the limited concentration on slum fiction which long characterised studies. The remit of this work is the exploration of the emergence of the alternative tradition in English literature, the relationship between socialist fiction and the mainstream. The work also connects the British contribution with the European socialist novel.

Author Biography

H. Gustav Klaus is Professor of the Literature of the British Isles, Universitšt Rostock, Germany. He has held visiting posts as visiting Professor, University of Queensland; Research Fellow, University of Edinburgh and visiting Fellow, Corpus Christi College, Oxford. His several publications include: The Rise of socialist fiction, 1880-1914 (1987), Factory Girl (1998) and (as co-editor) British Industrial Fiction (2000), James Kelman (2004), To hell with culture: anarchism and twentieth-century British literature (2005).

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