9781586037574

Security Sector Transformation in Southeastern Europe and the Middle East

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781586037574

  • ISBN10:

    1586037579

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2007-09-15
  • Publisher: Ios Pr Inc

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Supplemental Materials

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Summary

For most countries, security today is primarily measured in non-military terms and threats to security are non-military in nature. These threats include incompetent government, corruption, organized crime, insecure borders, smuggling (weapons, drugs, contraband, people), illegal migration, ethnic and religious conflict, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, shortage of natural resources (e.g., water) and, of course, terrorism. As security is no longer just a military concern, it is no longer just the preserve of MODs and MFAs which have, to date, been the main ministries involved in security cooperation. It is no longer possible to draw a clear distinction between external security and internal security. Security henceforth requires the coordination of the 'external' ministries (i.e., MOD and MFA) and their agencies (armed forces, intelligence services) with those of the 'interior' ministries: internal affairs, education, finance, overseas development, transport, environment; health, etc., with their agencies (policing forces, security services, disaster relief agencies, etc.). Security today takes in social development and demands the involvement of all elements of society in a way which security in the Cold War days did not. Meeting these new security requirements demands fundamental reform of national structures, patterns of investment, and systems of government. Likewise it demands the evolution of international institutions on a truly radical scale.

Table of Contents

The Challenge of Transformation in the Security Landscape of Todayp. 1
Developing a National Security Concept: Assessing New Threats to Securityp. 13
The Parliamentary Dimension of Security Sector Reformp. 21
Intelligence Services in the Post 9/11 Era: The Dilemma Between Efficiency and Democratic Controlp. 31
The Evolution of Civil-Military Relations and Progress in Greek Security Sector Reformp. 39
The Romanian Experience with Democratic Control of the Security Sectorp. 51
Security Sector Reform in Albania: An Overviewp. 71
Government Reform and Internal Cooperation: A Study of Albaniap. 85
The Civil-Military Power Balance Under the Justice and Development Party Government in Turkeyp. 101
Civil-Military Relations in Egypt: An Overviewp. 113
Civil-Military Relations and Security Sector Reform in the Arab World: The Experience of Palestinep. 121
Looking East and South: Promoting Security Sector Reform in the EU's Neighbourhoodp. 133
Security Sector Governance and Reform in South East Europe - A Brief Study in Norms Transferp. 145
ELIAMEP's Halki International Seminars 2005: Executive Summaryp. 173
Security Sector Reform: Courses and an Institutional Assessment Frameworkp. 183
Table of Contents provided by Blackwell. All Rights Reserved.

Excerpts

For most countries, security today is primarily measured in non-military terms and threats to security are non-military in nature. These threats include incompetent government, corruption, organized crime, insecure borders, smuggling (weapons, drugs, contraband, people), illegal migration, ethnic and religious conflict, proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, shortage of natural resources (e.g., water) and, of course, terrorism. As security is no longer just a military concern, it is no longer just the preserve of MODs and MFAs which have, to date, been the main ministries involved in security cooperation. It is no longer possible to draw a clear distinction between external security and internal security. Security henceforth requires the coordination of the 'external' ministries (i.e., MOD and MFA) and their agencies (armed forces, intelligence services) with those of the 'interior' ministries: internal affairs, education, finance, overseas development, transport, environment; health, etc., with their agencies (policing forces, security services, disaster relief agencies, etc.). Security today takes in social development and demands the involvement of all elements of society in a way which security in the Cold War days did not. Meeting these new security requirements demands fundamental reform of national structures, patterns of investment, and systems of government. Likewise it demands the evolution of international institutions on a truly radical scale.

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