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9780231096584

The Social Work Interview

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780231096584

  • ISBN10:

    0231096585

  • Edition: 4th
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1997-02-01
  • Publisher: Columbia Univ Pr

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

-- Ronald W. Toseland, author of An Introduction to Group Work Practice

Table of Contents

Introduction xiii
I. General Orientation and Basic Concepts of Interviewing and Communication 1(62)
1. The Interview in Social Work
3(24)
Defining the Interview and Distinguishing an Interview from a Conversation
4(7)
Defining the Social Work Interview
11(3)
Purposes of Social Work Interviews
14(3)
Information-Gathering or Social Study Interviews
15(1)
Assessment, Decision-Making Interviews
16(1)
Therapeutic Interviews
16(1)
Universal Aspects of Interviews
17(1)
Common Features of Social Work Interviews
18(1)
Alternatives to and Limitations of the Interview
19(3)
Limitations
19(1)
Structured Interviews
20(1)
Computers
21(1)
Summary: Chapter 1
22(2)
Suggested Readings
24(3)
2. The Interview as Communication
27(22)
Defining Communication and Its Essential Elements
27(2)
Metacommunication
29(1)
Sequential Steps in the Process of Communication
30(6)
Encoding by the Interviewer
30(1)
Transmitting
31(1)
Decoding by the Interviewee
31(2)
Encoding by Interviewee
33(3)
Understanding the Message
36(7)
Words and Meanings
39(1)
Jargon and Miscommunication
40(1)
Immediacy and Concreteness in Communication
41(2)
Feedback
43(3)
Summary: Chapter 2
46(1)
Suggested Readings
46(3)
3. Listening: A Basic Communication Skill
49(14)
Hearing Versus Listening
49(1)
Conditions for Good Listening
50(1)
Relating Listening to the Interview
51(1)
Social Listening Versus Interview Listening
52(4)
The Value of Knowledge for Listening
56(1)
Guidelines for Listening
57(3)
Summary: Chapter 3
60(1)
Suggested Readings
61(2)
II. Sequential Phases in the Interview Process and Associated Techniques 63(222)
4. Introductory Phase
65(34)
Interviewee's Background--What the Interviewee Brings
66(1)
Interviewer's Background--What the Interviewer Brings
67(2)
Deciding to Become a Social Work Interviewee
69(1)
The Path to the Agency--Selecting and Locating an Agency
69(6)
Approaching the Interview
71(1)
Scheduling
72(1)
Reception
73(1)
Waiting
74(1)
Interviewers' Preparation
75(5)
Setting
75(1)
Homework
76(1)
Direction or Outline
77(2)
Role Image
79(1)
Nonagency Setting
80(8)
Interviewee's Home
81(4)
Institution and Hospitals
85(3)
The Start of the Interview
88(8)
Preinterview Amenities: Meeting, Greeting, and Seating
88(4)
The Opening Question
92(1)
Clarifying the Purpose
93(2)
Inducting the Interviewee
95(1)
Summary: Chapter 4
96(2)
Suggested Readings
98(1)
5. Beginning the Interview: First Phase Objective--Establishing a Relationship
99(36)
Defining the Relationship
99(1)
Significance of a Positive Relationship
100(1)
Empirical Confirmation of Relationship's Significance
101(2)
Developing a Positive Relationship
103(24)
Acceptance
104(4)
Empathic Understanding
108(3)
Genuineness and Authenticity
111(2)
Interviewee Self-Determination
113(5)
Confidentially
118(4)
Respect for Clients' Individuality
122(2)
Interest, Warmth, Trust, Respect
124(3)
Relationships as an Interactional Event
127(1)
Inner Attitudes and Expressed Behaviors
128(4)
Transition from Opening Phase to the Body of the Interview
132(1)
Summary: Chapter 5
133(1)
Suggested Readings
133(2)
6. Problem Exploration Phase
135(38)
The Meaning and Sequence of Techniques
135(2)
Attending Behaviors and Minimal Encouragements (Expressions of Attention and Interest)
137(4)
Paraphrasing
141(3)
Reflection
144(6)
Reflection of Content
144(1)
Reflection of Feeling
145(5)
Summarizing
150(2)
Transitions
152(11)
Types of Transitions
154(1)
Making Transitions
155(1)
Transitional Interruptions
156(1)
Transition Caveats
157(3)
Interviewee-Initiated Transitions
160(3)
Reaching for Feelings
163(6)
Identifying and Calling Attention to Feelings
163(2)
Sanctioning Feelings
165(2)
Using Euphemisms and Indirection
167(1)
Discouraging Expression of Feelings
168(1)
Summary: Chapter 6
169(1)
Suggested Readings
170(3)
7. Developmental Phase: Problem-Solving Interventions
173(32)
Clarification
173(2)
Interpretation
175(8)
Confrontation
183(7)
Self-Disclosure
190(10)
Objectives of Self-Disclosure
192(2)
Dangers and Disadvantages
194(6)
Sharing Information
200(5)
8. Developmental Phase: More Problem-Solving Interventions
205(30)
Support and Reassurance
205(3)
Advice
208(5)
Silence
213(5)
Interviewees' Use of Silence
214(1)
Interviewers' Use of Silence
215(1)
Ending the Silence
216(2)
Humor
218(10)
Caveats Regarding Use of Humor
225(3)
Figures of Speech
228(1)
Environmental Modification
228(1)
Empirical Studies of Interventions Used
229(3)
Summary: Chapter 7 and 8
232(2)
Suggested Readings
234(1)
9. Developmental Phase: Questions and Questioning Techniques
235(36)
General Classifications: Open and Closed Questions
237(6)
Advantages of Open-Ended Questions
238(1)
Disadvantages of Open-Ended Questions
239(2)
Closed Questions
241(2)
Other Dimensions
243(1)
Probing Questions
244(4)
Formulation and Phrasing: Some Common Errors
248(10)
The Leading or Suggestive Question
248(4)
The Yes or No Question
252(2)
The Double Question
254(1)
The Garbled Question
255(1)
The "Why" Question
256(2)
Additional Guidelines for Formulating Questions
258(10)
Interviewers' Preparation for Asking Questions
265(3)
Summary: Chapter 9
268(3)
10. Termination, Recording, and Evaluation
271(14)
Termination Techniques
272(4)
Summary and Postinterview Conversation
276(3)
Review and Evaluation
279(1)
Note Taking
280(2)
Recording
282(1)
Summary: Chapter 10
283(1)
Suggested Readings
284(1)
III. Some Special Problems in Interviewing 285(102)
11. Nonverbal Communication
287(34)
Sources of Nonverbal Communication
289(20)
Chronomics
289(2)
Artifactual Communication
291(3)
Smell
294(1)
Touch
295(3)
Paralinguistics
298(2)
Proxemics
300(2)
Body Language--Kinesics
302(7)
Significance of Nonverbal Communication for Interviewing
309(12)
Process Considerations
314(1)
Problems in Inferring Meanings
315(2)
Summary: Chapter II
317(2)
Suggested Readings
319(2)
12. Cross-Cultural Interviewing
321(34)
Selective Examples of Cross-Cultural Interviews
322(14)
Race
323(1)
White Interviewer, African-American Interviewee
323(3)
African-American Interviewer, White Interviewee
326(1)
The Aged Client
327(4)
Sexual Orientation
331(5)
Individualizing the Cross-Cultural Client
339(1)
Should Interviewer and Interviewee Be Matched?
337(8)
Research on Matching
339(6)
Defining the Culturally Sensitive Interviewer
345(3)
The Use of Interpreters
348(3)
Interpreting for the Deaf
350(1)
Summary: Chapter 12
351(1)
Suggested Readings
352(3)
13. Some Problematic Interviews: The Involuntary Adult Client and the Sexually Abused Child
355(32)
Involuntary Interviewees
355(13)
Interviewing in Intrafamily Child Sexual Abuse
368(16)
Basic Attitudinal Approach to the Interview
369(3)
General Guidelines
372(12)
Summary: Chapter 13
384(1)
Suggested Readings
385(2)
IV. The Essence of the Good Interviewer 387(20)
14. The Competent Interviewer
389(18)
Personality Attributes
389(2)
Need for Knowledge
391(3)
Resolving Antithetical Demands
394(1)
Interviewees' Perceptions of the Good Interviewer
395(8)
Interviewees' Contribution to Interviewer Competence
397(1)
Distinguishing More and Less Competent Interviewers
398(5)
Summary: Chapter 14
403(1)
L'Envoi--
404(3)
Appendix: Transcribed Interview and Critique 407(18)
References 425(22)
Index 447

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