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9780262562126

Spinning The Semantic Web

by ; ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780262562126

  • ISBN10:

    026256212X

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2005-03-01
  • Publisher: Mit Pr
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Summary

As the World Wide Web continues to expand, it becomes increasingly difficult for users to obtain information efficiently. Because most search engines read format languages such as HTML or SGML, search results reflect formatting tags more than actual page content, which is expressed in natural language. Spinning the Semantic Webdescribes an exciting new type of hierarchy and standardization that will replace the current "web of links" with a "web of meaning." Using a flexible set of languages and tools, the Semantic Web will make all available information-display elements, metadata, services, images, and especially content-accessible. The result will be an immense repository of information accessible for a wide range of new applications. This first handbook for the Semantic Web covers, among other topics, software agents that can negotiate and collect information, markup languages that can tag many more types of information in a document, and knowledge systems that enable machines to read Web pages and determine their reliability. The truly interdisciplinary Semantic Web combines aspects of artificial intelligence, markup languages, natural language processing, information retrieval, knowledge representation, intelligent agents, and databases.

Table of Contents

Foreword xi
Tim Berners-Lee
The Original Dream xii
Re-enter Machines xiv
Where Are We Now? xiv
The World Wide Web Consortium xv
Where Is the Web Going Next? xvi
Introduction
1(28)
Dieter Fensel
James Hendler
Henry Lieberman
Wolfgang Wahlster
Why Is There a Need for the Semantic Web and What Will It Provide?
3(5)
How the Semantic Web Will Be Possible
8(21)
I Languages and Ontologies
Shoe: A Blueprint for the Semantic Web
29(36)
Jeff Heflin
James Hendler
Sean Luke
Introduction
29(2)
Background
31(5)
The Shoe Language
36(15)
Implementation
51(6)
Related Work
57(1)
Conclusion
58(7)
DAML-ONT: An Ontology Language for the Semantic Web
65(30)
Deborah L. McGuinness
Richard Fikes
Lynn Andrea Stein
James Hendler
Introduction
65(3)
An Introduction through Examples
68(9)
Notes
77(1)
Language Extensions
78(1)
An Axiomatic Semantics of DAML-ONT
79(11)
Conclusion
90(5)
Ontologies and Schema Languages on the Web
95(46)
Michel Klein
Jeen Broekstra
Dieter Fensel
Frank van Harmelen
Ian Horrocks
Introduction
95(1)
Ontologies and Schemas
96(2)
The Ontology Language Oil
98(5)
XML Schema
103(11)
RDF Schema
114(7)
Applying Ontologies to Online Resources
121(14)
Conclusion
135(6)
UPML: The Language and Tool Support for Making the Semantic Web Alive
141(30)
Borys Omelayenko
Monica Crubezy
Dieter Fensel
Richard Benjamins
Bob Wielinga
Enrico Motta
Mark Musen
Ying Ding
Introduction
141(3)
Brokering Reasoning Components on the Web
144(2)
UPML: The Language for Knowledge Component Markup
146(11)
An Editor for UPML Specifications Based on Protege-2000
157(6)
Conclusion
163(8)
Ontologies Come of Age
171(26)
Deborah L. McGuinness
Introduction: The Web's Growing Needs
171(2)
Ontologies
173(5)
Simple Ontologies and Their Uses
178(3)
Structured Ontologies and Their Uses
181(4)
Ontology Acquisition
185(1)
Ontology-Related Implications and Needs
186(5)
Conclusion
191(6)
II Knowledge Support
Sesame: An Architecture for Storing and Querying RDF Data and Schema Information
197(26)
Jeen Broekstra
Arjohn Kampman
Frank van Harmelen
Introduction
197(1)
RDF and RDF Schema
198(3)
The Need for an RDF/S Query Language
201(4)
Sesame's Architecture
205(7)
Sesame's Functional Modules
212(3)
Experiences
215(4)
Future Directions
219(1)
Conclusion
220(3)
Enabling Task-Centered Knowledge Support through Semantic Markup
223(30)
Rob Jasper
Mike Uschold
The Evolving Web
223(3)
Web Problem Solving
226(4)
The Domain
230(3)
Enabling Infrastructure
233(11)
Worked Example
244(6)
Conclusion
250(3)
Knowledge Mobility: Semantics for the Web as a White Knight for Knowledge-Based Systems
253(26)
Yolanda Gil
Introduction
253(1)
The Need for Knowledge Mobility
254(14)
A New Generation of Knowledge Bases: Resilient Hyper--Knowledge Bases
268(4)
Trellis: Building Resilient Hyper--Knowledge Bases
272(4)
Conclusion
276(3)
Complex Relationships for the Semantic Web
279(38)
Sanjeev Thacker
Amit Sheth
Shuchi Patel
Introduction
279(3)
Knowledge Modeling
282(14)
Information Scapes
296(2)
Knowledge Discovery
298(4)
Visual Interfaces
302(8)
Related Work
310(2)
Conclusion
312(5)
SEmantic portAL: The SEAL Approach
317(46)
Alexander Maedche
Steffen Staab
Nenad Stojanovic
Rudi Studer
York Sure
Introduction
317(1)
Ontologies and Knowledge Bases
318(7)
Ontology Engineering
325(7)
Seal Infrastructure and Core Modules
332(6)
Semantic Ranking
338(6)
Semantic Personalization
344(3)
RDF Outside: From a Semantic Web Site to the Semantic Web
347(3)
Related Work
350(4)
Conclusion
354(9)
III Dynamic Aspect
Semantic Gadgets: Ubiquitous Computing Meets the Semantic Web
363(14)
Ora Lassila
Mark Adler
Introduction
363(1)
About Representation
364(1)
Scenario: Semantic Gadget in a Museum
365(3)
Semantic Discovery
368(1)
Contracting for the Use of Services
369(1)
Composition of Services
370(1)
Museum Scenario Revisited: an Analysis
371(3)
Conclusion
374(3)
Static and Dynamic Semantics of the Web
377(26)
Christopher Fry
Mike Plusch
Henry Lieberman
Introduction
377(1)
Static Semantics
378(2)
Dynamic Semantics
380(1)
Sources of Dynamic Semantics
381(1)
Web Agents Make Use of Dynamic Semantics
382(2)
Information Retrieval and Theorem-Proving Perspectives
384(3)
The Semantic Web Should Not Sit on the Tower of Babel
387(2)
We Need Another Language like a Hole in the Head
389(1)
Is Procedural Attachment Rope to Hang Yourself?
390(1)
Glue Provides a Smooth Path from Text to Code
391(1)
Glue's Distinguishing Features
392(3)
A Glue Example
395(2)
Comparison of Glue with Java
397(2)
Comparison of Glue with Javascript
399(1)
Conclusion
400(3)
Semantic Annotation for Web Content Adaptation
403(28)
Masahiro Hori
Introduction
403(2)
External Annotation Framework
405(3)
Annotation-Based Transcoding System
408(3)
HTML Page Splitting for Small-Screen Devices
411(10)
Discussion
421(4)
Conclusion
425(6)
Task-Achieving Agents on the World Wide Web
431(28)
Austin Tate
Jeff Dalton
John Levine
Alex Nixon
Introduction and Motivation
431(1)
Standards for Representing Activities
432(6)
Web-Based Applications
438(3)
Application 1: O-Plan on the Web
441(7)
Application 2: ACP3
448(1)
Application 3: WOPlan
449(6)
Conclusion
455(4)
Contributors 459(6)
Index 465

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