IMPORTANT COVID-19 UPDATES

9781119605119

Structural Concrete Theory and Design

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9781119605119

  • ISBN10:

    1119605113

  • Edition: 7th
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2020-02-26
  • Publisher: Wiley

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
  • We Buy This Book Back!
    In-Store Credit: $24.99
    Check/Direct Deposit: $23.80
    PayPal: $23.80
List Price: $188.53 Save up to $69.75
  • Rent Book $118.78
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    TERM
    PRICE
    DUE
    USUALLY SHIPS IN 3-4 BUSINESS DAYS
    *This item is part of an exclusive publisher rental program and requires an additional convenience fee. This fee will be reflected in the shopping cart.

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

The leading structural concrete design reference for over two decades—updated to reflect the latest ACI 318-19 code

A go-to resource for structural engineering students and professionals for over twenty years, this newly updated text on concrete structural design and analysis reflects the most recent ACI 318-19 code. It emphasizes student comprehension by presenting design methods alongside relevant codes and standards. It also offers numerous examples (presented using SI units and US-SI conversion factors) and practice problems to guide students through the analysis and design of each type of structural member.

New to Structural Concrete: Theory and Design, Seventh Edition are code provisions for transverse reinforcement and shear in wide beams, hanger reinforcement, and bi-directional interaction of one-way shear. This edition also includes the latest information on two-way shear strength, ordinary walls, seismic loads, reinforcement detailing and analysis, and materials requirements. This book covers the historical background of structural concrete; advantages and disadvantages; codes and practice; and design philosophy and concepts. It then launches into a discussion of the properties of reinforced concrete, and continues with chapters on flexural analysis and design; deflection and control of cracking; development length of reinforcing bars; designing with the strut-and-tie method; one-way slabs; axially loaded columns; and more.

  • Updated to align with the new ACI 318-19 code with new code provisions to include: transverse reinforcement and shear in wide beams, hanger reinforcement, bi-directional interaction of one-way shear, and reference to ACI certifications
  • Includes dozens of worked examples that explain the analysis and design of structural members
  • Offers updated information on two-way shear strength, seismic loads, materials requirements, and more
  • Improves the design ability of students by explaining code requirements and restrictions 
  • Provides examples in SI units in every chapter as well as conversion factors from customary units to SI
  • Offers instructors access to a solutions manual via the book's companion website

Structural Concrete: Theory and Design, Seventh Edition is an excellent text for undergraduate and graduate students in civil and structural engineering programs. It will also benefit concrete designers, structural engineers, and civil engineers focused on structures.

Author Biography

M. NADIM HASSOUN, PHD, PE, FASCE, FICE, MACI, is Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering at South Dakota State University.

AKTHEM AL-MANASEER, PHD, PE, FASCE, FACI, FCSCE, is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at San Jose State University.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii

Notation xvii

Conversion Factors xxiii

1 Introduction 1

1.1 Structural Concrete 1

1.2 Historical Background 1

1.3 Advantages and Disadvantages of Reinforced Concrete 3

1.4 Codes of Practice 3

1.5 Design Philosophy and Concepts 3

1.6 Units of Measurement 4

1.7 Loads 5

1.8 Safety Provisions 6

1.9 Structural Concrete Elements 7

1.10 Structural Concrete Design 8

1.11 Accuracy of Calculations 8

1.12 Concrete High-Rise Buildings 8

References 11

2 Properties of Reinforced Concrete 12

2.1 Factors Affecting Strength of Concrete 12

2.2 Compressive Strength 14

2.3 Stress–Strain Curves of Concrete 14

2.4 Tensile Strength of Concrete 16

2.5 Flexural Strength (Modulus of Rupture) of Concrete 17

2.6 Shear Strength 17

2.7 Modulus of Elasticity of Concrete 18

2.8 Poisson’s Ratio 19

2.9 Shear Modulus 20

2.10 Modular Ratio 20

2.11 Volume Changes of Concrete 20

2.12 Creep 21

2.13 Models for Predicting Shrinkage and Creep of Concrete 22

2.14 Unit Weight of Concrete 57

2.15 Fire Resistance 57

2.16 High-Performance Concrete 58

2.17 Lightweight Concrete 58

2.18 Fibrous Concrete 59

2.19 Steel Reinforcement 59

Summary 64

References 65

Problems 66

3 Flexural Analysis of Reinforced Concrete Beams 69

3.1 Introduction 69

3.2 Assumptions 69

3.3 Behavior of Simply Supported Reinforced Concrete Beam Loaded to Failure 70

3.4 Types of Flexural Failure and Strain Limits 73

3.5 Load Factors 76

3.6 Strength Reduction Factor 𝜙 77

3.7 Significance of Analysis and Design Expressions 79

3.8 Equivalent Compressive Stress Distribution 79

3.9 Singly Reinforced Rectangular Section in Bending 82

3.10 Lower Limit or Minimum Percentage of Steel 89

3.11 Adequacy of Sections 90

3.12 Bundled Bars 93

3.13 Sections in the Transition Region (𝜙 < 0.9) 94

3.14 Rectangular Sections with Compression Reinforcement 96

3.15 Analysis of T- and I-Sections 105

3.16 Dimensions of Isolated T-Shaped Sections 112

3.17 Inverted L-Shaped Sections 113

3.18 Sections of Other Shapes 114

3.19 Analysis of Sections Using Tables 115

3.20 Additional Examples 116

3.21 Examples Using SI Units 117

Summary 119

References 122

Problems 122

4 Flexural Design of Reinforced Concrete Beams 125

4.1 Introduction 125

4.2 Rectangular Sections with Tension Reinforcement Only 125

4.3 Spacing of Reinforcement and Concrete Cover 127

4.4 Rectangular Sections with Compression Reinforcement 133

4.5 Design of T-Sections 138

4.6 Additional Examples 142

4.7 Examples Using SI Units 147

Summary 148

Problems 151

5 Shear and Diagonal Tension 155

5.1 Introduction 155

5.2 Shear Stresses in Concrete Beams 155

5.3 Behavior of Beams without Shear Reinforcement 158

5.4 Beam Shear Strength 160

5.5 Beams with Shear Reinforcement 161

5.6 ACI Code Shear Design Requirements 163

5.7 Design of Vertical Stirrups 168

5.8 Design Summary 169

5.9 Shear Force Due to Live Loads 174

5.10 Shear Stresses in Members of Variable Depth 178

5.11 Examples Using SI Units 183

Summary 186

References 187

Problems 187

6 Deflection and Control of Cracking 190

6.1 Deflection of Structural Concrete Members 190

6.2 Instantaneous Deflection 191

6.3 Long-Time Deflection 196

6.4 Allowable Deflection 197

6.5 Deflection Due to Combinations of Loads 197

6.6 Cracks in Flexural Members 206

6.7 ACI Code Requirements 209

Summary 213

References 214

Problems 215

7 Development Length of Reinforcing Bars 218

7.1 Introduction 218

7.2 Development of Bond Stresses 219

7.3 Development Length in Tension 222

7.4 Summary for Computation of Id in Tension 225

7.5 Development Length in Compression 227

7.6 Critical Sections in Flexural Members 228

7.7 Standard Hooks (ACI Code, Sections 25.4.3) 232

7.8 Splices of Reinforcement 235

7.9 Moment–Resistance Diagram (Bar Cutoff Points) 239

Summary 243

References 244

Problems 245

8 Design of Deep Beams by the Strut-and-Tie Method 248

8.1 Introduction 248

8.2 B- and D-Regions 248

8.3 Strut-and-Tie Model 248

8.4 ACI Design Procedure to Build a Strut-and-Tie Model 251

8.5 Strut-and-Tie Method According to AASHTO LRFD 259

8.6 Deep Members 260

References 277

Problems 277

9 One-Way Slabs 279

9.1 Types of Slabs 279

9.2 Design of One-Way Solid Slabs 281

9.3 Design Limitations According to ACI Code 283

9.4 Temperature and Shrinkage Reinforcement 283

9.5 Reinforcement Details 284

9.6 Distribution of Loads from One-Way Slabs to Supporting Beams 284

9.7 One-Way Joist Floor System 289

Summary 292

References 293

Problems 293

10 Axially Loaded Columns 295

10.1 Introduction 295

10.2 Types of Columns 295

10.3 Behavior of Axially Loaded Columns 296

10.4 ACI Code Limitations 297

10.5 Spiral Reinforcement 299

10.6 Design Equations 300

10.7 Axial Tension 301

10.8 Long Columns 301

Summary 304

References 304

Problems 305

11 Members in Compression and Bending 306

11.1 Introduction 306

11.2 Design Assumptions for Columns 308

11.3 Load–Moment Interaction Diagram 308

11.4 Safety Provisions 310

11.5 Balanced Condition: Rectangular Sections 311

11.6 Column Sections under Eccentric Loading 314

11.7 Strength of Columns for Tension Failure 315

11.8 Strength of Columns for Compression Failure 317

11.9 Interaction Diagram Example 322

11.10 Rectangular Columns with Side Bars 324

11.11 Load Capacity of Circular Columns 327

11.12 Analysis and Design of Columns Using Charts 331

11.13 Design of Columns under Eccentric Loading 336

11.14 Biaxial Bending 341

11.15 Circular Columns with Uniform Reinforcement under Biaxial Bending 343

11.16 Square and Rectangular Columns under Biaxial Bending 345

11.17 Parme Load Contour Method 346

11.18 Equation of Failure Surface 350

11.19 SI Example 352

Summary 354

References 355

Problems 356

12 Slender Columns 360

12.1 Introduction 360

12.2 Effective Column Length (Klu) 361

12.3 Effective Length Factor (K) 363

12.4 Member Stiffness (EI) 365

12.5 Limitation of the Slenderness Ratio (Klur) 366

12.6 Moment-Magnifier Design Method 367

Summary 377

References 378

Problems 379

13 Footings 381

13.1 Introduction 381

13.2 Types of Footings 383

13.3 Distribution of Soil Pressure 384

13.4 Design Considerations 386

13.5 Plain Concrete Footings 395

13.6 Combined Footings 407

13.7 Footings under Eccentric Column Loads 413

13.8 Footings under Biaxial Moment 414

13.9 Slabs on Ground 417

13.10 Footings on Piles 418

13.11 SI Equations 418

Summary 418

References 420

Problems 421

14 Retaining Walls 423

14.1 Introduction 423

14.2 Types of Retaining Walls 423

14.3 Forces on Retaining Walls 424

14.4 Active and Passive Soil Pressures 425

14.5 Effect of Surcharge 429

14.6 Friction on the Retaining Wall Base 430

14.7 Stability Against Overturning 431

14.8 Proportions of Retaining Walls 432

14.9 Design Requirements 433

14.10 Drainage 433

14.11 Basement Walls 444

Summary 447

References 448

Problems 448

15 Design for Torsion 452

15.1 Introduction 452

15.2 Torsional Moments in Beams 453

15.3 Torsional Stresses 454

15.4 Torsional Moment in Rectangular Sections 455

15.5 Combined Shear and Torsion 458

15.6 Torsion Theories for Concrete Members 458

15.7 Torsional Strength of Plain Concrete Members 462

15.8 Torsion in Reinforced Concrete Members (ACI Code Procedure) 462

15.9 Summary of ACI Code Procedures 469

Summary 476

References 477

Problems 477

16 Continuous Beams and Frames 480

16.1 Introduction 480

16.2 Maximum Moments in Continuous Beams 480

16.3 Building Frames 485

16.4 Portal Frames 486

16.5 General Frames 488

16.6 Design of Frame Hinges 490

16.7 Introduction to Limit Design 500

16.8 The Collapse Mechanism 502

16.9 Principles of Limit Design 502

16.10 Upper and Lower Bounds of Load Factors 503

16.11 Limit Analysis 504

16.12 Rotation of Plastic Hinges 507

16.13 Summary of Limit Design Procedure 513

16.14 Moment Redistribution of Maximum Negative or Positive Moments in Continuous Beams 516

Summary 523

References 524

Problems 525

17 Design of Two-Way Slabs 527

17.1 Introduction 527

17.2 Types of Two-Way Slabs 527

17.3 Economical Choice of Concrete Floor Systems 529

17.4 Design Concepts 532

17.5 Column and Middle Strips 535

17.6 Minimum Slab Thickness to Control Deflection 536

17.7 Shear Strength of Slabs 540

17.8 Analysis of Two-Way Slabs by the Direct Design Method 544

17.9 Design Moments in Columns 569

17.10 Transfer of Unbalanced Moments to Columns 570

17.11 Waffle Slabs 581

17.12 Equivalent Frame Method 589

Summary 598

References 598

Problems 599

18 Stairs 601

18.1 Introduction 601

18.2 Types of Stairs 601

18.3 Examples 617

Summary 625

References 625

Problems 625

19 Introduction to Prestressed Concrete 627

19.1 Prestressed Concrete 627

19.2 Materials and Serviceability Requirements 637

19.3 Loss of Prestress 639

19.4 Analysis of Flexural Members 645

19.5 Design of Flexural Members 654

19.6 Cracking Moment 659

19.7 Deflection 661

19.8 Design for Shear 664

19.9 Preliminary Design of Prestressed Concrete Flexural Members 670

19.10 End-Block Stresses 672

Summary 674

References 675

Problems 676

20 Seismic Design of Reinforced Concrete Structures 679

20.1 Introduction 679

20.2 Seismic Design Category 679

20.3 Analysis Procedures 695

20.4 Load Combinations 708

20.5 Special Requirements in Design of Structures Subjected to Earthquake Loads 709

References 740

Problems 740

21 Beams Curved in Plan 742

21.1 Introduction 742

21.2 Uniformly Loaded Circular Beams 742

21.3 Semicircular Beam Fixed at End Supports 749

21.4 Fixed-End Semicircular Beam under Uniform Loading 753

21.5 Circular Beam Subjected to Uniform Loading 755

21.6 Circular Beam Subjected to a Concentrated Load at Midspan 758

21.7 V-Shape Beams Subjected to Uniform Loading 761

21.8 V-Shape Beams Subjected to a Concentrated Load at the Centerline of the Beam 763

Summary 768

References 768

Problems 768

22 Prestressed Concrete Bridge Design Based on AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications 769

22.1 Introduction 769

22.2 Typical Cross Sections 769

22.3 Design Philosophy of AASHTO Specificatioins 773

22.4 Load Factors and Combinations (AASHTO 3.4) 773

22.5 Gravity Loads 776

22.6 Design for Flexural and Axial Force Effects (AASHTO 5.6) 784

22.7 Design for Shear (AASHTO 5.8) 785

22.8 Loss of Prestress (AASHTO 5.9.3) 791

22.9 Deflections (AASHTO 5.6.3.5.2) 792

References 816

23 Review Problems on Concrete Building Components 817

24 Design and Analysis Flowcharts 840

Appendix A: Design Tables (U.S. Customary Units) 864

Appendix B: Design Tables (SI Units) 874

Appendix C: Structural Aids 882

Index 903

Rewards Program

Write a Review