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9780291398468

Systems Engineering for Commercial Aircraft

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780291398468

  • ISBN10:

    0291398464

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1997-12-01
  • Publisher: Gower Technical

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

Explains the principles of systems engineering in simple, understandable terms and describes to engineers and managers how these principles would be applied to the development of commercial aircraft.

Table of Contents

Figures and tables
ix(3)
Acknowledgments xii
1 Introduction
1(6)
1.1 Definition of a system
1(1)
1.2 Definition of systems engineering
2(1)
1.3 Historical background
3(1)
1.4 Overview of this book and its themes
4(1)
1.5 Roadmap for applying SE to commercial aircraft
5(2)
2 Commercial aircraft
7(10)
2.1 The commercial aircraft industry
7(1)
2.2 Levels of SE application
8(1)
2.3 Aircraft architecture
9(4)
2.4 Advanced technologies on aircraft
13(3)
2.5 Aircraft manufacturing processes
16(1)
3 Functional analysis
17(18)
3.1 The SE life-cycle functions
18(5)
3.2 Aircraft system level functions
23(2)
3.3 Aircraft level functions
25(9)
3.4 Functional aspects of safety
34(1)
4 Requirements
35(14)
4.1 Requirements definition
35(1)
4.2 Requirements types
35(4)
4.3 Requirements development
39(1)
4.4 Requirements sources
40(3)
4.5 Requirements allocation to system elements
43(1)
4.6 Derived requirements
43(1)
4.7 The principle of top-down allocation
43(4)
4.8 Requirements trade-offs
47(1)
4.9 Requirements categories for certification
48(1)
5 Constraints and specialty requirements
49(20)
5.1 Regulatory requirements
49(1)
5.2 Mass properties
50(2)
5.3 Dimensions
52(1)
5.4 Reliability
52(1)
5.5 Human factors
53(5)
5.6 Environments
58(4)
5.7 Maintainability
62(4)
5.8 Design standards
66(1)
5.9 Emitted noise
66(1)
5.10 Emitted electromagnetic interference (EMI)
66(1)
5.11 Cost
67(1)
5.12 Transportability
67(1)
5.13 Flexibility and expansion
67(1)
5.14 Producibility
68(1)
6 Interfaces
69(10)
6.1 Functional interfaces
69(3)
6.2 Physical interfaces
72(1)
6.3 External interfaces
73(1)
6.4 Internal interfaces
74(1)
6.5 Interface management
75(1)
6.6 The interface control drawing (ICD)
76(1)
6.7 Development fixtures (DFs)
76(1)
6.8 The N(2) diagram
76(1)
6.9 Interface requirements
77(1)
6.10 Interface verification
77(2)
7 Synthesis
79(8)
7.1 Aircraft architecture
80(1)
7.2 Initial concept
80(1)
7.3 Trade-off studies
81(1)
7.4 Quality function deployment (QFD)
81(2)
7.5 Safety features
83(1)
7.6 Introduction of new technologies
84(1)
7.7 Preliminary design
85(2)
8 Top-level synthesis
87(16)
8.1 The aircraft system
87(3)
8.2 Top-level aircraft sizing
90(5)
8.3 Other top-level requirements
95(1)
8.4 System architecture
95(1)
8.5 Top-level constraints
96(1)
8.6 Economic constraints
96(6)
8.7 Top-level trade-offs
102(1)
9 Subsystem synthesis
103(20)
9.1 Environmental segment
104(2)
9.2 Avionics segment
106(6)
9.3 Electrical segment
112(1)
9.4 Interiors segment
113(2)
9.5 Mechanical segment
115(2)
9.6 Propulsion segment
117(3)
9.7 Auxiliary segment (ATA 49)
120(1)
9.8 Airframe segment
120(2)
9.9 Allocation to software
122(1)
9.10 Subsystem constraints
122(1)
10 Certification, safety and software
123(8)
10.1 Certification
124(1)
10.2 Safety
124(3)
10.3 Software development and certification
127(4)
11 Verification
131(4)
11.1 The verification matrix
131(1)
11.2 Traditional SE verification
132(2)
11.3 Verification of regulatory requirements
134(1)
11.4 Verification of customer requirements
134(1)
11.5 Verification sequence
134(1)
11.6 System validation
134(1)
12 Systems engineering management and control
135(22)
12.1 Introducing the process
136(2)
12.2 Management responsibilities
138(3)
12.3 The chief systems engineer
141(1)
12.4 Integrated product development (IPD)
141(2)
12.5 Design reviews
143(3)
12.6 Documentation
146(2)
12.7 Automated requirements tools
148(1)
12.8 Technical performance measurement (TPM)
148(1)
12.9 Software management
149(1)
12.10 Supplier management
149(2)
12.11 Configuration management
151(1)
12.12 Integration planning
152(1)
12.13 Organizational safety
153(1)
12.14 Risk management
153(4)
Final comments 157(14)
Appendix 1 The mathematics of reliability allocation 159(4)
A1.1 Basic reliability 159(1)
A1.2 Allocation for generically similar components 159(1)
A1.3 Allocation for generically different components 160(1)
A1.4 Redundancy 160(1)
A1.5 The whole airplane 161(2)
Appendix 2 Example commercial specification outline 163(6)
A2.1 Scope 164(1)
A2.2 Applicable documents 164(1)
A2.3 Requirements 164(4)
A2.4 Verfification 168(1)
A2.5 Preparation for delivery 168(1)
A2.6 Notes 168(1)
A2.7 Appendices 168(1)
Appendix 3 Systems engineering automated tools 169(2)
A3.1 Features of automated SE tools 169(1)
A3.2 Benefits of automated SE tools 170(1)
Bibliography 171(4)
Acronyms, abbreviations and symbols 175(4)
Glossary 179(8)
Index 187

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