9780152057800

Tangerine

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780152057800

  • ISBN10:

    0152057803

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2006-09-01
  • Publisher: Houghton Miff

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Summary

Though legally blind, Paul Fisher can see what others cannot. He can see that his parents' constant praise of his brother, Erik, the football star, is to cover up something that is terribly wrong. But no one listens to Paul--until his family moves to Tangerine. In this Florida town, weird is normal: Lightning strikes at the same time every day, a sinkhole swallows a local school, and Paul the geek finds himself adopted into the toughest group around: the soccer team at his middle school. Maybe this new start in Tangerine will help Paul finally see the truth about his past--and will give him the courage to face up to his terrifying older brother. Includes a reader's guide and an afterword by the author.

Author Biography

EDWARD BLOOR is the author of three acclaimed novels. A former high school teacher, he lives near Orlando, Florida.

Excerpts

Friday, August 18For Mom the move from Texas to Florida was a military operation, like the many moves she had made as a child. We had our orders. We had our supplies. We had a timetable. If it had been necessary to do so, we would have driven the eight hundred miles from our old house to our new house straight through, without stopping at all. We would have refueled the Volvo while hurtling along at seventy-five miles per hour next to a moving convoy-refueling truck.Fortunately this wasnt necessary. Mom had calculated that we could leave at 6:00 A.M. central daylight time, stop three times at twenty minutes per stop, and still arrive at our destination at 9:00 P.M. eastern daylight time.I guess thats challenging if youre the driver. Its pretty boring if youre just sitting there, so I slept on and off until, in the early evening, we turned off Interstate 10 somewhere in western Florida.This scenery was not what I had expected at all, and I stared out the window, fascinated by it. We passed mile after mile of green fields overflowing with tomatoes and onions and watermelons. I suddenly had this crazy feeling like I wanted to bolt from the car and run through the fields until I couldnt run anymore. I said to Mom, This is Florida? This is what it looks like?Mom laughed. Yeah. What did you think it looked like?I dont know. A beach with a fifty-story condo on it.Well, it looks like that, too. Floridas a huge place. Well be living in an area thats more like this one. There are still a lot of farms around.What do they grow? I bet they grow tangerines.No. Not too many. Not anymore. This is too far north for citrus trees. Every few years they get a deep freeze that wipes them all out. Most of the citrus growers here have sold off their land to developers.Yeah? And what do the developers do with it?Well . . . they develop it. They plan communities with nice houses, and schools, and industrial parks. They create jobs construction jobs, teaching jobs, civil engineering jobs like your fathers.But once we got farther south and crossed into Tangerine County, we did start to see groves of citrus trees, and they were an amazing sight. They were perfect. Thousands upon thousands of trees in the red glow of sundown, perfectly shaped and perfectly aligned, vertically and horizontally, like squares in a million-square grid.Mom pointed. Look. Here comes the first industrial park.I looked up ahead and saw the highway curve off, left and right, into spiral exit ramps, like rams horns. Low white buildings with black windows stretched out in both directions. They were all identical.Mom said, Theres our exit. Right up there.I looked ahead another quarter mile and saw another pair of spiral ramps, but I couldnt see much else. A fine brown dust was now blowing across the highway, drifting like snow against the shoulders and swirling up into the air.We turned off Route 27, spiraled around the rams horns, and headed east. Suddenly the fine brown dirt became mix

Excerpted from Tangerine by Edward Bloor
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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