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9780631212270

A Teacher's Guide to the Psychology of Learning

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780631212270

  • ISBN10:

    0631212272

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1999-07-09
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

The first edition of this book was one of the first to present the ideas of the psychology of learning in an integrated text. This fully revised edition includes the psychological research into children's learning and intelligence which has taken place over the past decade.

Author Biography

Michael Howe is Professor of Psychology at Exeter University. He is the author of many books (both trade and academic) and is a well-known expert on child geniuses.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Introduction: the beginnings of human learning
1(10)
Learning in the earliest years
3(2)
Language and human learning
5(6)
Preparing for learning at school
11(12)
Learning at home and learning at school
11(4)
Reading
15(4)
Learning in modern life
19(4)
Mental activities and human learning
23(20)
The effects of mental processing
23(4)
Processing language-based information
27(2)
Further investigations of mental processing
29(4)
Personal relevance
30(2)
Intention to learn
32(1)
Mental processing and children's learning
33(4)
Aiding learning by structuring information
37(2)
Using a narrative strategy
37(2)
Practical learning procedures based on mental images
39(3)
Conclusion
42(1)
Rehearsing and practising
43(12)
Rehearsing
43(1)
Investigating the effects of rehearsal
44(2)
Making use of rehearsal skills
46(1)
The consequences of rehearsing
47(1)
Self-testing activities
48(2)
Practising and its consequences
50(2)
Conclusion
52(3)
How existing knowledge aids learning
55(32)
An experiment on sentence recall
56(3)
Learning and knowing in children and adults
59(4)
Adult-Child comparisons when differences in knowledge and strategies are absent
60(2)
Using titles to help access relevant knowledge
62(1)
Negative influences of a learner's existing knowledge
63(4)
Distortions caused by previous knowledge
65(2)
Advance organizers for classroom learning
67(2)
Strategies for learning unfamiliar topics
69(7)
Can training be effective?
74(2)
The mental representation of knowledge
76(11)
Hierarchical representation of items and their properties
78(4)
Scripts and schemas
82(5)
Intelligence and human abilities
87(24)
Intelligence testing in practice
87(2)
How useful are intelligence test scores as practical predictors?
89(4)
Is intelligence largely unchangeable?
93(3)
Intelligence as a fundamental quality of the mind
96(1)
Intelligence and human learning
97(3)
Influences that contribute to high capabilities
100(4)
The assumed roles of innate gifts and talents
104(2)
Critical periods
106(5)
How motivation affects learning
111(12)
Motivation and success at school
111(2)
Achievement motivation
113(2)
Being in control
115(5)
The effects of altered locus of control
118(1)
Locus of control and student mastery
119(1)
Pawns and origins
119(1)
Self-efficacy
120(1)
Success and failure in the classroom
121(1)
Some conclusions
122(1)
Reading, comprehension and learning
123(18)
Helping students to understand
124(2)
Coding and comprehending
126(1)
The skills of comprehension
127(5)
Monitoring
128(2)
Generating and evaluating hypotheses
130(2)
Teaching comprehension strategies
132(2)
Stage One
132(1)
Stage Two
133(1)
Stage Three
134(1)
Evaluating comprehension training
134(5)
The training studies
136(3)
Some conclusions
139(2)
Extending writing skills
141(14)
From conversation to written communication
141(1)
Note-taking
142(2)
Effects of repeated recall attempts
144(2)
Note-taking style and student learning
146(2)
Using pre-prepared notes
148(1)
Learning to make notes
149(1)
Making summaries
150(1)
Learning other skills that aid writing: remedial activities
151(4)
References 155(10)
Index 165

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