9780072982008

Teaching to Change the World

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780072982008

  • ISBN10:

    0072982004

  • Edition: 3rd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2006-05-22
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities/Social Sciences/Languages

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping Icon Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • eCampus.com Logo Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $100.85 Save up to $25.21
  • Buy Used
    $75.64
    Add to Cart Free Shipping Icon Free Shipping

    USUALLY SHIPS IN 2-4 BUSINESS DAYS

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

In 1998, the first edition ofTeaching To Change The Worldbroke new ground in teacher education by positioning the foundations and practices of American schooling in the context of the struggle for social justice, democratic communities, and a better world. Indeed, "teaching to change the world" has become more than a book title; for thousands of individuals and for entire teacher education programs it is an everyday expression that embodies rigorous preparation and the highest professional aspirations for becoming a teacher.Author Jeannie Oakes was the founding director of UCLA's Center X--the institutional home of the university's teacher education program--a program based on the research and principles thatTeaching To Change The Worldrepresents. Oakes draws from her distinguished research career as a sociologist of education to integrate the components of educational foundations into a thematic and ideological whole. The result is a sustainable theory of education that positions new teachers to be highly competent in the classroom, lifelong education reformers, and education leaders and partners with students and families. Co-author Martin Lipton brings to this book 31 years of classroom experience and a parallel career as education writer and consultant. His photographs of the book's featured teachers and their students reveal that social justice classrooms are both ordinary and inspired.

Table of Contents

Introduction xvii
The Book's Perspective xviii
New to This Edition xx
Overview of Chapters xxi
Digging Deeper: Going Beyond the Text xxiv
Perspectives of Those Engaged in Hopeful Struggle xxv
Readers' ``Tools for Critique'' xxv
Acknowledgments xxvii
PART I The Foundations of American Schooling
The American Schooling Dilemma: Diversity, Inequality, and Democratic Values
3(31)
Who Are American Students?
5(3)
Where Do Students Live and Go to School?
5(1)
How Racialy and Ethnically Diverse Are Students?
6(2)
Multiculturalism Is a Demographic Fact, Not a Political Ideology
8(1)
Inequalities Outside of School
9(6)
Economic Inequality
9(2)
Inequality in the Basics of Life
11(1)
Racial Inequality
12(2)
Racial, Geographic, and Economic Isolation
14(1)
Schooling Inequalities
15(10)
Segregated Schools
16(1)
Unequal Spending
16(1)
Unequal Opportunities to Learn
17(4)
Unequal Community and Peer Resources at School
21(1)
Gaps in Achievement, School Completion, and College Attendance
22(3)
The Struggle for Socially Just Teaching
25(4)
Mauro Bautista
25(1)
Kimberly Min
26(1)
Mark Hill
27(1)
Judy Smith
28(1)
Digging Deeper
29(5)
History and Culture: Wrestling with the Traditions of American Education
34(38)
A History of Increasing Expectations
36(1)
Common Public Schools Can Secure Democracy
36(14)
Public Schools Can Preserve ``American'' Culture
40(5)
Public Schools Can Support the Nation's Workforce and Economy
45(2)
Public Schools Can Ensure National Security
47(1)
Public Schools Can Solve Social Problems
47(2)
Public Schools Can Boost International Competitiveness
49(1)
A Culture of Powerful Ideologies
50(15)
The Myth of Merit: ``Any Child Can Grow Up to Be President''
51(4)
Deficit Thinking and White Privilege
55(10)
Teaching for Democracy in a Contradictory Culture
65(1)
Digging Deeper
66(6)
Philosophy and Politics: The Struggle for the American Curriculum
72(49)
Basic Philosophies of Education
74(6)
The Roots of Western Educational Philosophy
74(2)
Philosophy in the History of American Schooling
76(1)
Six Philosophies of Education
77(3)
Philosophy and Politics in the Struggle for the School Curriculum
80(14)
Essentialist Mass Education in the Nineteenth Century
80(2)
Essentialist Elite Education in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries
82(1)
The Common School
82(3)
The ``Progressive Education'' Movement
85(1)
Child- and Community-Centered Progressivism
86(3)
Social Reconstructionism
89(1)
Postr-World War II, Sputnik, and Curriculum Crisis
90(2)
Back to Basics
92(2)
The Postmodern Curricula: Critical Multicultural and Sociocultural Perspectives
94(16)
Multicultural Education
95(8)
Sociocultural Perspectives on Curriculum and Learning
103(7)
The Curriculum Struggle Today: An Essentialist Backlash to Multicultural and Sociocultural Perspectives
110(5)
Backlash as ``Excellence''
110(1)
Backlash as Essentialist Certainty
111(1)
Backlash as Preserving the Dominant Culture
111(1)
Backlash as Standards
112(1)
Backlash in Favor of ``One Right Way''
113(1)
Backlash as ``No Child Left Behind''
114(1)
Digging Deeper
115(6)
PART II The Practice of Teaching to Change the World
The Subject Matters: Making School Knowledge Meaningful
121(45)
Mathematics
123(8)
The Math Crisis
123(1)
What's the Problem?
124(1)
Traditional Mathematics: Skills-Based and Sequential
124(1)
Progressive Mathematics: Meaningful Knowledge in Context
125(3)
The Math Standards: The Politics of Mathematics Continues
128(3)
English Language Arts
131(9)
Traditional Language Arts: Mastering Skills, Rules, and Forms
132(1)
Progressive Approaches to Language Arts: Developing Literacy
133(1)
National Standards in the Language Arts
134(1)
Multicultural Lessons
135(2)
A Conservative Backlash
137(1)
Seeking Balance
138(2)
Social Studies
140(10)
Traditional versus Progressive, Multicultural Social Studies
143(4)
Seeking a Middle Ground: The National History Standards
147(3)
Science
150(8)
Traditional versus Progressive Science Curricula
151(2)
National Standards: Deep, Integrated, Socially Relevant Science for All
153(3)
The Conservative Backlash
156(1)
Debating Darwin
156(1)
Will Anybody Do Science?
157(1)
The Struggle for the Subject Matter
158(1)
Digging Deeper
158(8)
Instruction: Classrooms as Learning Communities
166(42)
How Teachers Taught
168(2)
Matching Teaching to Theories of Learning and Intelligence
170(4)
Learning Is Developmental, Social, and Cultural
170(2)
Intelligence Is Learned, Cultural, and Multidimensional
172(1)
Contemporary Theories in the Classroom
173(1)
Confidence in a Context of Difference
174(9)
Difference Is Normal
174(1)
Comparisons Are Avoided
175(1)
It's Safe to Be Different
176(2)
High Expectations for Everybody
178(1)
Lessons to Construct Confidence
179(4)
Confident Teachers
183(1)
Opportunities for Active, Multidimensional, and Social Learning
183(14)
Students Learning Together
184(2)
Multidimensional Tasks
186(2)
Scaffolded Participation
188(1)
Three Research-Based Scaffolding Strategies
189(2)
Productive Group Work
191(3)
Technology as Scaffolding
194(3)
Building on Students' Culture and Language
197(5)
All Students Bring ``Funds of Knowledge'' and Cultural Competencies
198(1)
``Additive'' Instruction for English Learners
199(3)
No Easy Recipes
202(1)
Digging Deeper
203(5)
Assessment: Measuring What Matters
208(39)
A Few Definitions
209(3)
The History of Educational Testing
212(10)
Testing in Early China
212(1)
Testing in Nineteenth-Century U.S. Schools
213(3)
The Development of Scientific Testing
216(6)
Contemporary Large-Scale Testing
222(9)
Standardized Testing
223(4)
Standards-Based Testing
227(2)
Professional Guidelines for Using Large-Scale Tests
229(1)
Large-Scale Alternative Assessment
229(2)
Contemporary Classroom Assessment
231(12)
Shifting from Traditional to Alternative Classroom Assessments
232(1)
Principles to Guide Assessments That Promote Learning
232(3)
Assessments That Promote Learning
235(2)
Assessments That Provide Multiple Routes to Success
237(2)
Assessments That Are Interactive
239(1)
Assessments That Are Personalized
240(2)
Assessments That Include ``Authentic'' Tasks
242(1)
A Culture of Authenticity
243(1)
Digging Deeper
243(4)
Classroom Management: Caring, Respectful, and Democratic Relationships
247(43)
Three Caring, Respectful, and Democratic Classrooms
249(4)
Management, Discipline, and Control: Lasting Legacies
253(11)
Classrooms as Smooth-Running Factories
253(3)
Classrooms as Socializing Agents
256(1)
Using Behavioral Psychology to Control Student Behavior
257(5)
Can Effective Teaching Prevent Disruption?
262(2)
Caring, Respect, and Democracy: A Second Set of Legacies
264(8)
Child-Centered Schooling
264(2)
An Ethic of Care
266(1)
The Power of Relationships
266(4)
Making Classrooms Communities
270(2)
Socially Just Classrooms: Doing Democracy
272(11)
Critical Pedagogy Responds to Students' ``Resistance''
273(2)
Democratic Classrooms and Diversity
275(3)
Democratic Classrooms and Power
278(5)
Creating Classroom Communities Is a Struggle
283(2)
Digging Deeper
285(5)
Grouping, Tracking, and Categorical Programs: Can Schools Teach All Students Well?
290(47)
Labeling and Sorting in Today's Schools
292(6)
Sorting by Academic Ability and Achievement
293(1)
Sorting by Postsecondary Prospects
294(1)
Sorting by ``Giftedness''
295(1)
Sorting by Disabilities
295(2)
Sorting by English Language Competence
297(1)
Why Do Schools Label and Sort Students?
298(5)
The Social Construction of Difference
298(2)
The History of Biased Sorting
300(3)
Grouping Dilemmas
303(14)
The Arbitrariness of Labels and Sorting
303(2)
The Illusion of Homogeneity
305(2)
Race and Social Class Bias
307(3)
Ties to Behavioral Learning Theory and Transmission Teaching
310(1)
Self-Fulfilling Prophecies and Processes
310(4)
Disappointing Outcomes
314(1)
Controversy Surrounds Homogeneous Grouping
315(1)
To Change or to Fix
316(1)
Accommodating Diversity without Sorting
317(10)
Implementing Heterogeneous Grouping
319(5)
Technical Skills, Norms and Beliefs, Politics and Power
324(3)
The Struggle for Heterogeneous Grouping
327(1)
Digging Deeper
328(9)
PART III The Context of Teaching to Change the World
The School Culture: Where Good Teaching Makes Sense
337(45)
Schools as Cultures
339(3)
Cultures Shape Sense-Making
340(1)
Cultures Where It Makes Sense to Teach All Students Well
341(1)
A Press for Learning and Social Justice
342(7)
Learning Is the Top Priority
343(2)
It's Normal When Everyone Learns Well
345(4)
Broad and Deep Access to Learning
349(6)
Sufficient Resources
350(1)
High-Quality Teaching
350(2)
A Rich, Balanced Curriculum
352(1)
Extra Help When Needed
353(1)
Support for a Multicultural, College-Going Identity
354(1)
Access to Care
355(11)
Every Student Known by Name
355(4)
Safe Zones: It's OK to Be Different
359(3)
After Columbine---Care in a Violent Culture
362(1)
After September 11 and Katrina---Care in a Fearful Culture
363(3)
Inquiry and Activism
366(8)
Teaching Together Can Foster Inquiry and Learning
368(1)
Faculties as Inquiring Communities
369(2)
Inquiry and Power
371(3)
Creating Cultures Where Good Teaching Makes Sense
374(2)
Will ``Small Schools'' Provide the Solution?
374(1)
Necessary, But Not Sufficient
375(1)
Digging Deeper
376(6)
The Community: Engaging with Families and Neighborhoods
382(38)
Complaints about Parent Involvement: Too Little and Too Much
384(6)
Too Little Involvement: Low-Income Parents Who Don't or Can't Care
385(2)
Too Much Involvement: Middle- and Upper-Class Parent Power
387(2)
Removing Barriers to Constructive Parent Engagement
389(1)
Parents Supporting the School's Agenda
390(3)
Schools Meeting Families' Needs
393(4)
A Legacy of Services in Low-Income Communities
393(1)
Today's Full-Service Schools
394(3)
Service, Power, and Deficits
397(1)
Bridging the Cultures of Schools and Families
397(10)
Learning with and from Communities
398(3)
Bridging Students' ``Multiple Worlds''
401(2)
Bridging through the Curriculum
403(2)
Bridging through Community Liaisons
405(2)
Partnering with Families and Communities in Educational Activism
407(7)
A Tradition of Parent Activism
407(2)
Contemporary Organizing for School Reform
409(5)
Whose Agenda Is It?
414(1)
Digging Deeper
415(5)
Policy and Law: Rules to Make Schools Effective, Efficient, and Equitable
420(49)
The Complex Education Policy System
423(6)
Three Levels of Educational Governance
423(3)
How Do Policies Work?
426(3)
Ideas That Shape Education Policy
429(10)
Schools as Economic Enterprises
430(7)
Schools as Instruments of Equity and Social Justice
437(2)
Policy Effects on Teachers and Students
439(18)
Accountability for Results: Large-Scale Tests and ``High Stakes''
441(12)
``Scientifically Based Research'' and Teaching
453(4)
The Courts and Education Equity
457(4)
Digging Deeper
461(8)
PART IV Teaching for the Long Haul
Teaching to Change the World: A Profession and a Hopeful Struggle
469
Teaching: A Vulnerable Profession
471(11)
Full-Fledged Professionals from Day One
472(1)
Teaching Everybody's Children
473(1)
Teacher Shortages
474(1)
Teacher Attrition
475(1)
Teachers' Salaries and Working Conditions
475(2)
Teachers' Unions
477(5)
Strategies for a Career to Change the World
482(27)
Become Part of a Learning Community
484(7)
Become a Social Justice Activist
491(8)
Expand Your Professional Influence
499(2)
Commit to a Hopeful Critique
501(2)
Find Satisfaction in the Everyday
503(6)
Digging Deeper
509
Bibliography 1(1)
Photo Credits 1
Index

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

The Used, Rental and eBook copies of this book are not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Rewards Program