9780130280275

Teaching Music in the Twenty-First Century

by ; ; ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780130280275

  • ISBN10:

    0130280275

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2000-08-02
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

Unique in both content and approach, this book offers a single-volumeauthoritativecomparison of the four most popular music education methods used in North AmericaJacques-Dalcroze, Kodaly, Orff, and Comprehensive Musicianship. Its in-depth examination of the methods and underlyingphilosophiesof each method--and its suggested lessons for each method at each grade level--will help readers make knowledgeable curricular choices among methods. Both the New National Standards (MENC) and the use of technology in the study of music are described and discussed in relation to all four methods.Method in North American Music TeachingThe Beginning. Influences on Methods, Approaches, and Philosophies of Teaching Music. Technology and Music Education. The Approach of Jacques-Dalcroze. The Kodaly Method. The Orff Approach. Comprehensive Musicianship: An American Technique and Philosophy for Teaching Music. Achieving Goals and Objectives in School Music Programs Via the Principles of Jacques-Dalcroze, Kodaly, Orff, and Comprehensive Musicianship. Grades K-1-2. Grades 3-4-5. Grades 6-7-8. Method in Music for Older Students. Which Methods?For music educators.

Table of Contents

Preface ix
Method in North American Music Teaching: The Beginnings
1(11)
What is Method?
2(1)
Looking Back
2(9)
The Contributions of Horace Mann
2(2)
Introduction of Music Into Public Schools
4(1)
The Influence of Lowell Mason
5(6)
Looking at the Present
11(1)
Influence on Methods, Approaches, and Philosophies of Teaching Music
12(12)
The Woods Hole Conference
12(1)
The Young Composers Project
13(1)
The Yale Seminar
13(3)
Music Materials
14(1)
Music Performance
14(2)
The Manhattanville Music Curriculum Program
16(1)
The Tanglewood Symposium
16(1)
The Go Project
17(1)
Goals 2000: Educate America Act
18(1)
The National Standards
18(1)
The Ann Arbor Symposium
19(2)
The Mountain Lake Colloquium
21(1)
The Getty Education Institute for the Arts
21(1)
Summary
22(2)
Technology and Music Education
24(16)
Introduction
24(1)
Electronic Musical Instruments
25(2)
Technology as a ``More Capable Other''
27(1)
Computers and Information Technology
28(1)
Interactive Multimedia
29(1)
Music Notation Software
30(2)
Music Sequencing
32(1)
Computer Assisted Instruction
33(1)
Accompaniment Software
34(1)
Conferencing
35(1)
The Internet and the World Wide Web
36(2)
The World Wide Web: A Teaching-Learning Tool
38(1)
Conclusion
39(1)
The Approach of Emile Jaques-Dalcroze
40(41)
The Educational Philosophy of Jaques-Dalcroze
42(6)
The Reasons for Training in Rhythm
44(1)
The Birth of Eurhythmics: First Experiences and Discoveries
44(2)
Kinesthesia: The Missing Link
46(2)
Techniques of Eurhythmics
48(4)
The Use of Improvisation in Eurhythmics Classes
49(1)
The Use of Movement in Eurhythmics
49(3)
The Development of Inner-Hearing
52(1)
Content of Eurhythmics
52(1)
The Thirty-Four Jaques-Dalcroze Elements of Rhythm
53(8)
Jaques-Dalcroze's Contribution to Rhythmic Theory
61(2)
Solfege-Solfege-Rythmique and Improvisation
63(2)
Solfege
63(2)
Musical Interpretation
65(8)
Phrasing, Nuance, and Expression
65(1)
Numbered Melodies
66(1)
Scales, Tonalities, Intonation, and Hearing
67(2)
Syllables and Numbers
69(1)
Solfege, Tonality, Nuance, Phrasing
69(3)
Solfege-Rythmique
72(1)
Improvisation
73(6)
Beginning Keyboard Improvisation
77(2)
Improvisation and the Printed Page
79(1)
Conclusion
79(2)
The Kodaly Method
81(22)
Objectives of Kodaly Musical Training
83(18)
A Child-Developmental Approach
83(1)
The Tools of the Kodaly Method
83(5)
Sequencing for Learning
88(1)
Some Possible Kodaly Sequences in Rhythm, Melody, Form, and Harmony
89(12)
Combining the Elements
101(1)
Summary and Conclusions
101(2)
The Orff Approach
103(12)
The Origins of Schulwerk
103(4)
The Orff Process
107(2)
Exploration of Space
107(1)
Exploration of Sound
107(1)
Exploration of Form
108(1)
Imitation to Creation
108(1)
Individual to Ensemble
109(1)
Musical Literacy
109(1)
Support Systems for the Process: Orff Instruments
109(4)
Voice and Body
109(2)
The Instrumentarium
111(2)
The Musical Materials
113(1)
Summary
114(1)
Comprehensive Musicianship: An American Technique and Philosophy for Teaching Music
115(9)
The Young Composers Project
116(1)
The Contemporary Mu`sic Project
116(1)
The Comprehensive Musicianship Approach
117(6)
Common Elements
119(1)
Musical Functions
120(1)
Educational Strategies
121(2)
Summary and Conclusions
123(1)
Achieving Goals and Objectives in School Music Programs via the Principles of Jaques-Dalcroze, Kodaly, Orff, and Comprehensive Musicianship
124(36)
National Standards for Arts Education
124(1)
National Standards for Music
124(2)
Physical Settings, Equipment Needs, lesson Planning, and Teaching Styles
126(1)
Jaques-Dalcroze
126(11)
Teaching Style
126(2)
Space, Equipment, and Clothing
128(1)
Musical Materials
128(1)
Lesson Planning
128(3)
Exercise and Game Plans
131(2)
Three Types of Lesson Plans
133(2)
The Process of Eurhythmics
135(2)
Kodaly
137(7)
Lesson Planning
139(1)
Pedagogical Process
140(3)
Musical Materials
143(1)
Orff
144(7)
Lesson Planning
145(4)
Musical Materials
149(1)
Physical Setting
150(1)
Comprehensive Musicianship
151(8)
Classroom Objectives
151(1)
Role of the Teacher
151(2)
Planning for Musical Learning
153(2)
Application of CM in the Upper Elementary Grades and in the Junior High School General Music program
155(2)
Application of CM in Secondary Performing Ensembles
157(2)
Conclusions
159(1)
Grades K-1-2
160(44)
Introduction: The National Standards
160(1)
Jaques-Dalcroze
161(14)
Preschool
161(1)
Nursery School through Grade 2
162(2)
Lesson for Primary Grades
164(11)
Kodaly
175(11)
Lesson for an Early Stage
175(6)
Lesson for the End of Grade 2
181(5)
Conclusion
186(1)
Orff
186(9)
Movement
187(1)
Voice
187(1)
Form
187(1)
Suggested Orff Experiences
188(7)
Comprehensive Musicianship
195(8)
Learning Objectives
195(1)
Lesson Plans
196(6)
Summary
202(1)
Incorporating Technology into the Music Lesson
203(1)
Conclusions
203(1)
Grades 3-4-5
204(52)
Introduction: The National Standards
204(1)
Jaques-Dalcroze
205(16)
Rhythmics
205(1)
Lesson Plan
206(15)
Conclusion
221(1)
Kodaly
221(15)
Lesson for Grade 3
221(7)
Lesson for Grade 5
228(8)
Orff
236(9)
Movement
237(1)
Voice
237(1)
Form
237(1)
Instruments
238(2)
Lesson Cycle
240(5)
Comprehensive Musicianship
245(10)
Learning Objectives
245(1)
The Organization of Pitch, Duration, Intensity, and Timbre
246(1)
Lesson Plans Emphasizing the Comprehensive Musicianship Approach to Teaching in the Intermediate Grades
247(7)
Summary
254(1)
Incorporating Technology into the Music Lesson
255(1)
Conclusions
255(1)
Grades 6-7-8
256(41)
Introduction: The National Standards
256(2)
Jaques-Dalcroze
258(11)
Lesson on Group Improvisation
259(10)
Conclusion
269(1)
Kodaly
269(8)
Lesson for Twelve- and Thirteen-Year-Olds
270(7)
Conclusion
277(1)
Orff
277(8)
Movement
277(1)
Voice
277(1)
Organization and Materials of Music
278(1)
Instruments
278(1)
Evaluation
279(1)
Lesson Cycle
280(5)
Conclusion
285(1)
Compherhensive Musicianship
285(11)
Learning Objectives
285(1)
The Organization of Pitch, Duration, Intensity, and Timbre
286(1)
Lesson Plans
287(8)
Summary
295(1)
Incorporating Technology Into the Music Lesson
296(1)
Conclusion
296(1)
Method in Music for Older Students
297(37)
Introduction: The National Standards
297(2)
Jaques-Dalcroze
299(15)
Lessons on Solfege and Solfege-Rhythmique
299(15)
Conclusion
314(1)
Kodaly
314(9)
Lesson, Example 1
316(4)
Conclusion
320(1)
Lesson, Example, 2
320(3)
Conclusion
323(1)
Orff
323(6)
Lesson Cycle
324(5)
Conclusion
329(1)
Comprehensive Musicianship
329(3)
Learning Objectives
329(1)
The Organization of Pitch, Duration, Intensity, and Timbre
330(1)
Lesson Plans
330(1)
Summary
330(2)
Incorporating Technology into the Music Lesson
332(1)
Conclusion
333(1)
Which Method?
334(8)
History
334(1)
Comparing Methods
335(1)
Goals
336(1)
Musical Functions
336(4)
Creating
336(1)
Moving
337(1)
Singing and Playing
338(1)
Musical Reading and Writing
338(1)
Performing and Listening
339(1)
Inferences
340(2)
Conclusion
342

Excerpts

PrefaceI originally chose to write this book in order to provide an authoritative comparison among the four most commonly practiced methods found in music classrooms. The concept was that such a book could not be written by one author, but must be written by a group, each with impeccable credentials in the method about which he or she was writing. I chose for my co-authors three music educators, each an authority in the approach about which he was to write.Robert Abramson, then professor of Music at the Manhattan School of Music, and now at the Julliard School of Music was an obvious choice for the Jaques-Dalcroze chapters. Abramson spent two years at the Jaques-Dalcroze Institute in Geneva, where he obtained the highest level of certification possible in the field, and he has practiced Jaques-Dalcroze techniques successfully in the United States for many years.Avon Gillespie, then Associate Professor of Music at North Texas State University, formerly taught at the Orff Institute in Salzburg. In many conversations with him over the years he displayed a remarkably clear vision of the Orff Approach. When I asked him to contribute to the book, he wrote to me "... there is a real need for this philosophy to be elusive and abstract ...." Fortunately I was able to convince him that his writing would not be molded into any "pattern" and he agreed to write the Orff chapters. His untimely death prevented him from contributing to this second edition. When I consulted with our co-authors as to whether I should invite another Orff practitioner to contribute, or to retain the original Orff chapters, they unanimously opted to retain the original chapters. We believe that Gillespie's exposition of Orff to be a model of clarity. He presents the Orff Approach in both an uncompromised and uncompromising way.My choice for the Comprehensive Musicianship sections was a long time friend, David Woods, who has been involved with this approach since its earliest days. Dr. Woods is presently Dean of the School of Music, Indiana University and was formerly Dean of the School of Music, Oklahoma University.With my background of study in Hungary and publication of several books on the Kodaly Method, I was in a position to write the Kodaly chapters as well as to coordinate the whole project.The assembling of the project was not easy. The first edition was five years in the making. Each of us had a natural bias for his or her own way of teaching, and to describe that way without expressing a bias was difficult. However, we believe that we succeeded in doing so.When the first edition appeared we thought it unlikely that it would ever require revision. After all, the philosophies and practices associated with Jaques-Dalcroze, Kodaly, Orff, and Comprehensive Musicianship were immutable. Superficial techniques might change but the principles would remain unchanged. However, two factors have made this second edition advisable.First, the exponential development of technology is changing forever the ways in which knowledge is acquired and disseminated. In the face of the increasing use of technology in music education, it became imperative to examine just what it could offer and how it could be used appropriately to enhance musical learning. For the new sections on technology in this book we were joined by Frank York of James Cook University in Townsville, Australia. York is involved in Distance Education and has made extensive use of technology in his teacher education programs.Second, the Music Education National Conference (MENC) has brought forward a definitive set of National Standards for the Arts in Education, and particularly for the teaching and leaning of music in the schools. These excellent guidelines, the culmination of years of work, have, to an extent never realized before, established Music Education as a legitimate subject for serious study--a subject in which there ar

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