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9783540431534

Testing for Genetic Manipulation in Plants

by ; ;
  • ISBN13:

    9783540431534

  • ISBN10:

    3540431535

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2002-12-01
  • Publisher: Springer Verlag

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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

Summary

The debate over genetic manipulation and its use in plant improvement and protection has led to an increased demand for developing methods for detecting and characterizing genetic manipulation in plants and plant products such as seeds and foods. This book is unique in presenting all relevant methods together in one volume: those for using and determining markers retained in genetically manipulated products as well as methods for eliminating marker genes and procedures for characterizing chromosomal aberrations in genetically manipulated plants.

Table of Contents

Selectable and Screenable Markers for Rice Transformation
R.M. Twyman
E. Stoger
A. Kohli
T. Capell
P. Christou
Introduction
1(2)
Dominant Selectable Markers for Rice
3(4)
Aminoglycoside 3'-Phosphotransferase (Neomycin Phosphotransferase)
3(1)
Hygromycin Phosphotransferase
4(1)
Phosphinothricin Acetyltransferase
4(1)
Other Dominant Selectable Markers
5(2)
Novel Selectable Markers
7(1)
Innocuous Markers
7(1)
Counterselectable Markers
7(1)
Screenable Marker Genes
8(5)
β-Glucuronidase (gusA)
9(2)
Firefly Luciferase (luc)
11(1)
Green Fluorescent Protein (gfp)
11(2)
Strategies for Marker-Gene Delivery
13(6)
References
14(5)
Use of Green Fluorescent Protein to Detect Transformed Shoots
J. Molinier
G. Hahne
Introduction
19(1)
GFP: Suitable as a Visually Selectable Marker In Planta?
20(2)
Important Properties of the Protein
20(1)
Properties of a Useful Selectable Marker in Plant Transformation Technology
21(1)
GFP Expression and Detection in Primary Transformed Tissues
22(6)
Transient Expression and GFP Detection
22(1)
Detection Equipment and Troubleshooting
22(1)
Stable Expression and GFP Detection in Primary Transformed Tissues
23(5)
GFP for Screening of Segregating Populations
28(1)
Conclusion
29(2)
References
29(2)
Luciferase Gene Expressed in Plants, Not in Agrobacterium
S.L. Mankin
Introduction
31(1)
Preventing Bacterial Expression
31(1)
Imaging Luciferase Activity In Planta
32(2)
Measuring Luciferase Activity in Plant Extracts
34(3)
References
35(2)
Use of β-Glucuronidase (GUS) To Show Dehydration and High-Salt Gene Expression
K. Nakashima
K. Yamaguchi-Shinozaki
Introduction
37(2)
What Is GUS?
39(2)
Trasgenic Plants Carrying Promoter-GUS Constructs
41(8)
Construction of Promoter-GUS Fusion Genes
44(1)
Introduction of Promoter-GUS Constructs into Agrobacterium
45(1)
Transformation of Plants with Agrobacterium
46(1)
Transformation of Arabidopsis Plants
46(3)
Fluorometric Assay
49(2)
Introduction
49(1)
Stress Conditions
49(1)
Plant Preparation
49(1)
Dehydration
49(1)
High Salinity
49(1)
ABA Treatment
50(1)
Other Treatments
50(1)
Protein Assay
50(1)
Sample Preparation
50(1)
Fluorometric Assay
51(1)
Histochemistry
51(1)
Introduction
51(1)
Histochemistry
52(1)
Northern Analysis of GUS
52(4)
Introduction
52(1)
RNA Extraction
53(1)
RNA Blotting
54(1)
Northern Hybridization
55(1)
Application of the GUS System
56(1)
Transient Assay
56(1)
Transactivation Experiment
57(1)
Promoter Tagging (Enhancer Trap)
57(1)
Conclusion
57(6)
References
59(4)
Methods for Detecting Genetic Manipulation in Grain Legumes
H.-J. Jacobsen
R. Greiner
Introduction
63(1)
Detection at the DNA Level
64(1)
PCR Analysis
65(1)
Control PCR and Specific PCR Systems
66(3)
Quantitative Approach
69(1)
Competitive PCR
69(1)
Real-Time PCR Systems
70(1)
Concluding Remarks
70(3)
References
71(2)
Elimination of Selectable Marker Genes from Transgenic Crops
A.P. Gleave
Introduction
73(1)
Co-transformation
74(4)
Transposon-Mediated Approaches
78(3)
Transposon-Mediated Repositioning
78(2)
Transposon-Mediated Elimination
80(1)
Site-Specific Recombination
81(8)
The Cre/loxP System
82(4)
The FLP/frt System
86(2)
The R/RS System
88(1)
Intrachromosomal Homologous Recombination
89(1)
Conclusions and Future Prospects
90(5)
References
91(4)
GST-MAT Vector for the Efficient and Practical Removal of Marker Genes from Transgenic Plants
H. Ebinuma
K. Sugita
E. Matsunaga
S. Endo
K. Yamada
Introduction
95(1)
ipt-Type MAT Vectors
96(7)
Transposable Element
96(1)
Site-Specific Recombination System
97(4)
Advantages of the ipt Gene
101(2)
Two-Step Transformation
103(9)
Promoter of the R Gene
103(2)
Promoter of the ipt Gene
105(3)
Combination of the ipt and iaaM/H Genes
108(2)
Transgene Stacking
110(2)
Single-Step Transformation
112(2)
Cloning Vector for Desired Genes
114(1)
Concluding Remarks
115(4)
References
116(3)
Safety Assessment of Insect Protected Crops: Testing the Feeding Value of Bt Corn and Cotton Varieties in Poultry, Swine and Cattle
B. Hammond
E. Stanisiewski
R. Fuchs
J. Astwood
G. Hartnell
Introduction
119(3)
Food Safety Standards
119(1)
Testing for Food and Feed Safety
120(2)
Insect Protection Traits
122(1)
Benefits
123(1)
Safety Assessment of the Cry Insect-Control Proteins
124(1)
Mode of Action
125(1)
Substantial Equivalence Based on Compositional Analysis
126(1)
Current Products
127(1)
Grower Acceptance
127(1)
Future Products
127(1)
Farm-Animal Studies
128(5)
Bt Corn
128(1)
Poultry
128(3)
Lactating Cows
131(1)
Beef and Sheep
131(1)
Swine
132(1)
Cottonseed
133(1)
Conclusions
134(5)
References
135(4)
Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Rice and Potatoes with Soybean Glycinin
K. Momma
W. Hashimoto
S. Utsumi
K. Murata
Introduction
139(1)
Safety Assessment of Genetically Modified Crops
140(6)
Genetically Modified Rice
141(3)
Genetically Modified Potatoes
144(2)
Concluding Remarks
146(7)
References
149(4)
Chromosomal and Genetic Aberrations in Transgenic Soybean
R.J. Singh
Introduction
153(1)
Times in Culture with 2,4-D Prior to Transformation
154(5)
Genetic Background of the Explants
159(1)
Seed Fertility in Transgenic Soybean
160(3)
Cytological Basis of Gene Silencing
163(1)
Conclusions
164(5)
References
165(4)
Transgenic Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) and Chromosomal Variation
M.-J. Cho
H.W. Choi
P. Bregitzer
S. Zhang
P.G. Lemaux
Introduction
169(1)
Chromosomal Variation in Nontransgenic Barley Plants
170(2)
Chromosomal Variation in Transgenic Barley Plants
172(5)
Fidelity and Quality of Transgenic Barley Plants
177(7)
Comparative Analysis of Genomic Stability in Plants Derived from Tissues Generated Using Different in Vitro Proliferation Processes
177(2)
Somaclonal Variation and Field Performance of Transgenic Plants Derived from Embryogenic Callus
179(1)
Stability of Transgenes and Transgene Expression
180(4)
Conclusions and Future Perspectives
184(5)
References
185(4)
Subject Index 189

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