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9780199258741

Textbook on Ec Law

by ;
  • ISBN13:

    9780199258741

  • ISBN10:

    0199258740

  • Edition: 8th
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2003-11-06
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
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Summary

Textbook on EC Law is one of the leading textbooks in this area, providing a single book of manageable size which covers all the major areas of EC Law - constitutional, administrative, as well as substantive. The success of this approach, both at home and abroad, is reflected in the fact that this eighth edition is appearing only fifteen years after the first. The new edition is in response to far reaching changes taking place in the legal arena, and in the way the subject is being taught in today.

Author Biography

Christian Twigg-Flesner is Lecturer in Law at the University of Sheffield.

Table of Contents

Preface xv
Abbreviations xvii
Table of Cases xix
Table of Commission Decisions lxxvi
Table of UK Statutes lxxvii
Table of European Community Treaties lxxviii
Table of EU Secondary Legislation lxxxiv
Part One
1 From EEC to EU: a brief history of the development of the Union
3(16)
1.1 Introduction
3(1)
1.2 Development prior to the Single European Act
3(2)
1.3 The Single European Act
5(1)
1.4 Treaty on European Union
5(3)
1.5 Impact of the Treaty of Amsterdam
8(3)
1.6 Treaty of Nice
11(1)
1.7 Theories of integration
12(2)
1.8 Conflicting attitudes towards the Union
14(1)
1.9 Expansion of membership
15(1)
1.10 Beyond Nice
16(3)
2 Institutions of the EC: composition and powers
19(21)
2.1 Introduction
19(1)
2.2 Parliament
20(5)
2.3 Council
25(4)
2.4 Commission
29(3)
2.5 Economic and Social Committee
32(1)
2.6 Committee of the Regions
32(1)
2.7 Budgetary procedures
33(1)
2.8 Court of Auditors
33(1)
2.9 Court of Justice
34(3)
2.10 Conclusions
37(3)
3 Scope of the EC Treaty: laws and law-making in the Community
40(24)
3.1 Introduction
40(1)
3.2 Scope of the EC Treaty
40(4)
3.3 Basis for legislative action
44(2)
3.4 Expansion of Community competence
46(2)
3.5 Subsidiarity
48(16)
3.4 Principle of supremacy of EC law
64
3.6 Law-making process
50(3)
3.7 Legislative acts
53(3)
3.8 Sources of EC Law
56(1)
3.9 Problems in the law-making process
57(5)
3.10 Conclusions
62(2)
4 Principle of supremacy of EC law
64(24)
4.1 The problem of priorities
64(1)
4.2 The Court of justice's contribution
65(6)
4.3 The Member States' response
71(14)
4.4 Conclusions
85(3)
5 Principles of direct applicability and direct effects: State liability under Francovich
88(39)
5.1 Introduction
88(1)
5.2 Doctrine of direct effects
88(17)
5.3 Principle of indirect effects
105(6)
5.4 Principle of State liability under Francovich v Italy
111(12)
5.5 Conclusions
123(4)
6 Remedies in National Courts
127(26)
6.1 Introduction
127(1)
6.2 General principles regarding national procedural rules
128(1)
6.3 Finding the balance between national procedural autonomy and the principles of equivalence and effectiveness
129(12)
6.4 Impact of EC law on national remedies
141(8)
6.5 Conclusions
149(4)
7 General principles of law
153(34)
7.1 Introduction
153(1)
7.2 Rationale for the introduction of general principles of law
154(1)
7.3 Development of general principles
155(5)
7.4 Relationship between the EC/EU and the ECHR in the protection of human rights
160(2)
7.5 The EU Charter of Fundamental Rights
162(4)
7.6 Rules of administrative justice
166(9)
7.7 Equality
175(2)
7.8 Subsidiarity
177(1)
7.9 General principles applied to national legislation
177(4)
7.10 Conclusions
181(6)
Part Two
8 Introduction to the Common Market
187(14)
8.1 Introduction
187(1)
8.2 The four freedoms
188(4)
8.3 Common themes in the free movement provisions
192(4)
8.4 Relationship between the freedoms
196(1)
8.5 The social dimension
197(1)
8.6 Completion of the internal market and the position of third country nationals
198(3)
9 Customs union
201(15)
9.1 Introduction
201(1)
9.2 Common customs tariff
202(1)
9.3 Prohibition between Member States of customs duties on imports and exports and of all charges of equivalent effect
203(5)
9.4 Prohibition of discriminatory taxation
208(5)
9.5 Harmonisation of indirect taxation
213(1)
9.6 Conclusions
214(2)
10 Elimination of quantitative restrictions on imports and exports and all measures having equivalent effect
216(23)
10.1 Introduction
216(1)
10.2 Outline of provisions
217(1)
10.3 Whose actions are caught?
217(3)
10.4 Types of act caught
220(1)
10.5 Prohibition on quantitative restrictions
220(1)
10.6 Prohibition measures having equivalent effect to quantitative restrictions
221(15)
10.7 Prohibition, as between Member States, of quantitative restrictions on exports and of all measures having equivalent effect
236(2)
10.8 Conclusions
238(1)
11 Derogation from the elimination of quantitative restrictions
239(19)
11.1 Introduction
239(1)
11.2 Outline of Article 30
239(1)
11.3 Proportionality and disguised restriction on trade
240(1)
11.4 Grounds for derogation
241(14)
11.5 Derogation provisions other than Article 30 (ex 36) EC
255(1)
11.6 Conclusions
256(2)
12 Harmonisation
258(19)
12.1 Introduction
258(1)
12.2 The nature of harmonisation
259(2)
12.3 Types of harmonisation
261(8)
12.4 Article 95 (ex 100a) and harmonisation
269(4)
12.5 The impact of harmonisation on domestic law
273(2)
12.6 Conclusions
275(2)
13 State monopolies of a commercial character
277(3)
13.1 Introduction
277(1)
13.2 Article 31
277(1)
13.3 Prohibition on discrimination on grounds of nationality
278(1)
13.4 Relationship with other Treaty provisions
279(1)
13.5 Conclusions
279(1)
14 Restrictions on State aid
280(19)
14.1 Introduction
280(1)
14.2 Structure of State aid provisions
281(4)
14.3 Meaning of State aid
285(6)
14.4 Policy of the Commission
291(2)
14.5 Relationship between State aid and other provisions of the Treaty
293(2)
14.6 Enforcement by individuals
295(2)
14.7 Conclusions
297(2)
15 Free movement of workers
299(36)
15.1 Introduction
299(1)
15.2 Fundamental Community rights
299(2)
15.3 Personal scope
301(7)
15.4 Test for the application of Article 39
308(2)
15.5 Material scope
310(21)
15.6 'Employment in the public service'
331(2)
15.7 Derogation on grounds of public policy, public security or public health
333(1)
15.8 Conclusions
333(2)
16 Freedom of establishment; freedom to provide services; freedom to receive services
335(33)
16.1 Introduction
335(1)
16.2 Scope of provisions
335(2)
16.3 Definitions
337(2)
16.4 Beneficiaries of the right
339(1)
16.5 Fundamental Community rights
340(2)
16.6 Test for the applications of Articles 43 and 49
342(6)
16.7 A rule of reason for services and establishment?
348(2)
16.8 Harmonisation
350(2)
16.9 Professional qualifications
352(4)
16.10 Home country regulation and abuse of freedom of establishment and the right to provide services
356(2)
16.11 Freedom to receive services
358(8)
16.12 Conclusions
366(2)
17 Free movement of persons: limitation on grounds of public policy, public security or public health (Directive 64/221)
368(12)
17.1 Introduction
368(1)
17.2 Scope of Directive 64/221 and the relationship with Treaty provisions
368(2)
17.3 Substantive grounds for derogation
370(1)
17.4 Personal conduct
371(3)
17.5 Procedural rights
374(4)
17.6 Conclusions
378(2)
18 Completion of the internal market: extending free movement rights
380(15)
18.1 Introduction
380(1)
18.2 Rights under the directives
381(1)
18.3 The citizen's right of free movement
382(5)
18.4 Impact of the TOA: the new free movement rights
387(6)
18.5 Conclusions
393(2)
19 Introduction to competition policy
395(8)
19.1 The structure of EC competition provisions
395(1)
19.2 The theory of competition
396(1)
19.3 EC competition policy
397(3)
19.4 Enforcement of EC competition law
400(1)
19.5 Public undertakings
400(2)
19.6 Competition and third countries
402(1)
20 Anti-competitive agreements, decisions and concerted practices
403(32)
20.1 Introduction
403(1)
20.2 The general scheme
403(2)
20.3 Elements of an infringement
405(1)
20.4 Agreements between undertakings, decisions by associations of undertakings and concerted practices
405(4)
20.5 Public authorities
409(1)
20.6 Field of application of Article 81(1) (ex 85(1)) EC
410(1)
20.7 'Which may affect trade between Member States'
411(2)
20.8 'Which have as their object or effect the prevention, restriction or distortion of competition within the common market'
413(3)
20.9 The de minimis principle
416(2)
20.10 Agreements capable of preventing, restricting or distorting competition
418(6)
20.11 The rule of reason
424(2)
20.12 Article 81(3) (ex 85(3)): exemption
426(4)
20.13 Block exemptions
430(3)
20.14 Conclusions
433(2)
21 Abuse of a dominant position
435(25)
21.1 Introduction
435(1)
21.2 Overview of prohibition
435(1)
21.3 Undertakings
436(1)
21.4 joint dominance
436(1)
21.5 The principle of dominance
437(9)
21.6 Abuse
446(6)
21.7 Trade between Member States
452(1)
21.8 The Merger Regulation
453(3)
21.9 Relationship with Article 86(2) (ex 90(2)) EC
456(2)
21.10 Conclusions
458(2)
22 Enforcement of the competition provisions: powers and procedures
460(29)
22.1 Introduction
460(1)
22.2 Development of competition enforcement
460(2)
22.3 Powers and duties of the Commission
462(2)
22.4 Investigative powers
464(5)
22.5 Confidentiality
469(2)
22.6 Sanctions
471(4)
22.7 Concentrations
475(1)
22.8 The role of national authorities
475(8)
22.9 The role of individuals
483(4)
22.10 Conclusions
487(2)
23 Competition law and intellectual property rights
489(4)
23.1 Introduction
489(1)
23.2 Improper exercise of rights
489(1)
23.3 The specific subject-matter of IP rights
490(2)
23.4 Block exemption and Article 82
492(1)
23.5 Conclusions
492(1)
24 Sex discrimination
493(42)
24.1 Introduction
493(1)
24.2 Overview of provisions
494(1)
24.3 Equal pay for equal work: Article 141 (ex 119) EC
495(1)
24.4 Pay
496(4)
24.5 Discrimination
500(4)
24.6 Objective justification
504(2)
24.7 Equal work
506(2)
24.8 Equal pay for work of equal value (Directive 75/117)
508(3)
24.9 Principle of equal treatment for men and women (Directive 76/207)
511(4)
24.10 Derogation from the equal treatment principle (Articles 2(2), 2(3) and 2(4))
515(8)
24.11 Principle of equal treatment in matters of social security (Directive 79/7)
523(6)
24.12 Principle of equal treatment in occupational pension schemes (Directive 86/378)
529(1)
24.13 Equal treatment in self-employment (Directive 86/613)
530(1)
24.14 Remedies
531(1)
24.15 Conclusions
532(3)
Part Three
25 Overview of the jurisdiction of the European Courts
535(9)
25.1 Introduction
535(1)
25.2 Action before the European Courts
536(5)
25.3 Action before national courts
541(2)
25.4 Conclusions
543(1)
26 The preliminary rulings procedure
544(33)
26.1 Introduction
544(1)
26.2 The procedure
545(1)
26.3 Jurisdiction of the Court of Justice
546(2)
26.4 Scope of the Court's jurisdiction
548(7)
26.5 'Court or tribunal'
555(3)
26.6 Jurisdiction of the national courts to refer
558(11)
26.7 Effect of a ruling
569(3)
26.8 Interim measures
572(1)
26.9 Impact of the Treaty of Amsterdam
572(2)
26.10 Nice and the impact of enlargement
574(1)
26.11 Conclusions
574(3)
27 Enforcement actions
577(16)
27.1 Introduction
577(1)
27.2 Outline of enforcement mechanism
577(1)
27.3 Purposes of enforcement actions
578(1)
27.4 Member States' failure to fulfil an obligation
579(1)
27.5 Procedure
580(4)
27.6 Defences
584(5)
27.7 Consequences of ruling SRR
27.8 Action by Member States (Article 227 (ex 170) EC)
589(2)
27.9 Special enforcement procedures: State aid, breach of Article 95(4) (ex 100a(4)) procedures and measures to prevent serious internal disturbances
591(1)
27.10 Conclusions
591(2)
28 Direct action for annulment
593(30)
28.1 Introduction
593(1)
28.2 Reviewable acts
594(2)
28.3 Locus standi: who may bring an action?
596(17)
28.4 Time limits
613(2)
28.5 The merits
615(5)
28.6 Consequences of a successful action
620(1)
28.7 Conclusions
621(2)
29 Action for failure to act
623(12)
29.1 Introduction
623(1)
29.2 Reviewable omissions
624(1)
29.3 Locus standi
625(5)
29.4 Procedure
630(3)
29.5 Consequences of a successful action
633(1)
29.6 Conclusions
634(1)
30 Indirect review before the Court of Justice
635(6)
30.1 Introduction
635(1)
30.2 Proceedings in which Article 241 (ex 184) may be invoked
636(1)
30.3 Reviewable acts
637(1)
30.4 Locus standi
638(1)
30.5 Grounds of review
639(1)
30.6 Consequences of a successful challenge
639(1)
30.7 Conclusion
640(1)
31 Community liability in tort, action for damages
641(24)
31.1 Introduction
641(1)
31.2 Scope of non-contractual liability
641(1)
31.3 Lucus stands
642(1)
31.4 Elements of non-contractual liability
643(1)
31.5 Wrongful acts or omissions
643(1)
31.6 Liability for wrongful acts having legal effect
644(2)
31.7 Establishing a breach: the Schöppenstedt formula
646(9)
31.8 Individual acts
655(1)
31.9 Damage
655(2)
31.10 Causation
657(2)
31.11 Relationship between Article 288(2) (ex 215(2)) and other remedies
659(1)
31.12 Concurrent liability
659(3)
31.13 Conclusions
662(3)
Bibliography 665(1)
Further reading 666(5)
Index 671

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