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9780198751724

A Treatise of Human Nature

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  • ISBN13:

    9780198751724

  • ISBN10:

    0198751729

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2000-02-24
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press

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Summary

Hume's comprehensive effort to form an observationally grounded study of human nature employs John Locke's empiric principles to construct a theory of knowledge from which to evaluate metaphysical ideas. A key to modern studies of 18th-century Western philosophy, the "Treatise" considers numerous classic philosophical issues, including causation, existence, freedom and necessity, and morality.

Author Biography


David Norton is Macdonald Professor of Moral Philosophy and Co-director of the Hume Society/National Endowment for the Humanities Institute on the Philosophy of David Hume.
Mary J. Norton is an independent scholar

Table of Contents

PART 1: INTRODUCTORY MATERIAL
How to Use this Book
13(2)
List of Abbreviations
15(4)
Editor's Introduction
19(97)
Hume's Early Years and Education
19(93)
A Treatise of Human Nature
112(2)
The Experimental Method and the Science of Human Nature
114(2)
BOOK I: OF THE UNDERSTANDING 116(30)
The Elements of the Mental World
116(5)
Perceptions
117(3)
Relations
120(1)
Abstract Ideas
121(1)
The Ideas of Space and Time
121(3)
Knowledge, Probability, Belief, and Causation
124(14)
Relations Revisited
124(3)
The Relation of Causation
127(2)
Causes and Causal Reasoning
129(2)
Experience and Belief
131(2)
Belief in the Uniformity of Nature
133(2)
The Idea of Necessary Connection
135(3)
Forms of Scepticism
138(8)
External Objects
138(5)
Enduring Selves and Personal Identity
143(2)
The Conclusion of Book 1
145(1)
BOOK 2: OF THE PASSIONS 146(28)
The Productive Passions
148(1)
The Responsive Passions
149(1)
The Indirect Passions of Pride and Humility
150(7)
The `very essence' of Virtue and Beauty
152(2)
Unexercised Powers
154(1)
Sympathy
155(2)
The Indirect Passions of Love and Hatred
157(8)
Passions and the Principles of Association
157(3)
The Compound Passions
160(1)
Passions and Relations
161(1)
Dispositions
162(3)
The Direct Passions and the Will
165(9)
The Will and its Influences
165(7)
The Direct Passions
172(2)
BOOK 3: OF MORALS 174
The Source of Moral Distinctions
175(6)
The Failure of Reason
176(3)
Moral Sentiments
179(2)
The Artificial Virtues
181(10)
Motives and Moral Qualities
182(2)
Justice
184(5)
Additional Artificial Virtues
189(2)
Natural Virtues and Natural Abilities
191
Natural Virtues
192(3)
Natural Abilities
195(1)
The Conclusion of Book 3
196
The Abstract and the Early Reception of the Treatise
197(904)
Supplementary Reading
1101(5)
A Note on the Texts of this Edition
1106
PART 2: THE TEXT A TREATISE OF HUMAN NATURE 1(1)
BOOK I. OF THE UNDERSTANDING 1(178)
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2(1)
Introduction
3(4)
Of ideas, their origin, composition, connexion, abstraction, &c.
7(16)
Of the origin of our ideas
7(4)
Division of the subjects
11(1)
Of the ideas of the memory and imagination
11(1)
Of the connexion or association of ideas
12(2)
Of relations
14(2)
Of modes and substances
16(1)
Of abstract ideas
17(6)
Of the ideas of space and time
23(27)
Of the infinite divisibility of our ideas of space and time
23(1)
Of the infinite divisibility of space and time
24(3)
Of the other qualities of our ideas of space and time
27(4)
Objections answer'd
31(9)
The same subject continu'd
40(8)
Of the idea of existence, and of external existence
48(2)
Of knowledge and probability
50(71)
Of knowledge
50(2)
Of probability; and of the idea of cause and effect
52(4)
Why a cause is always necessary
56(2)
Of the component parts of our reasonings concerning cause and effect
58(1)
Of the impressions of the senses and memory
59(2)
Of the inference from the impression to the idea
61(4)
Of the nature of the idea or belief
65(4)
Of the causes of belief
69(5)
Of the effects of other relations and other habits
74(7)
Of the influence of belief
81(5)
Of the probability of chances
86(3)
Of the probability of causes
89(8)
Of unphilosophical probability
97(8)
Of the idea of necessary connexion
105(11)
Rules by which to judge of causes and effects
116(2)
Of the reason of animals
118(3)
Of the sceptical and other systems of philosophy
121(58)
Of scepticism with regard to reason
121(4)
Of scepticism with regard to the senses
125(19)
Of the antient philosophy
144(4)
Of the modern philosophy
148(4)
Of the immateriality of the soul
152(12)
Of personal identity
164(7)
Conclusion of this book
171(8)
BOOK 2. OF THE PASSIONS 179(112)
Of pride and humility
181(33)
Division of the subject
181(1)
Of pride and humility; their objects and causes
182(2)
Whence these objects and causes are deriv'd
184(1)
Of the relations of impressions and ideas
185(2)
Of the influence of these relations on pride and humility
187(3)
Limitations of this system
190(3)
Of vice and virtue
193(2)
Of beauty and deformity
195(3)
Of external advantages and disadvantages
198(4)
Of property and riches
202(4)
Of the love of fame
206(5)
Of the pride and humility of animals
211(3)
Of love and hatred
214(43)
Of the objects and causes of love and hatred
214(2)
Experiments to confirm this system
216(9)
Difficulties solv'd
225(2)
Of the love of relations
227(4)
Of our esteem for the rich and powerful
231(5)
Of benevolence and anger
236(2)
Of compassion
238(2)
Of malice and envy
240(5)
Of the mixture of benevolence and anger with compassion and malice
245(5)
Of respect and contempt
250(3)
Of the amorous passion, or love betwixt the sexes
253(2)
Of the love and hatred of animals
255(2)
Of the will and direct passions
257(34)
Of liberty and necessity
257(5)
The same subject continu'd
262(3)
Of the influencing motives of the will
265(3)
Of the causes of the violent passions
268(3)
Of the effects of custom
271(1)
Of the influence of the imagination on the passions
272(2)
Of contiguity and distance in space and time
274(3)
The same subject continu'd
277(3)
Of the direct passions
280(6)
Of curiosity, or the love of truth
286(5)
BOOK 3. OF MORALS 291(279)
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292(1)
Of virtue and vice in general
293(14)
Moral distinctions not deriv'd from reason
293(9)
Moral distinctions deriv'd from a moral sense
302(5)
Of justice and injustice
307(60)
Justice, whether a natural or artificial virtue?
307(4)
Of the origin of justice and property
311(11)
Of the rules, which determine property
322(8)
Of the transference of property by consent
330(1)
Of the obligation of promises
331(6)
Some farther reflections concerning justice and injustice
337(5)
Of the origin of government
342(3)
Of the source of allegiance
345(7)
Of the measures of allegiance
352(2)
Of the objects of allegiance
354(8)
Of the laws of nations
362(2)
Of chastity and modesty
364(3)
Of the other virtues and vices
367(203)
Of the origin of the natural virtues and vices
367(11)
Of greatness of mind
378(6)
Of goodness and benevolence
384(3)
Of natural abilities
387(4)
Some farther reflections concerning the natural abilities
391(2)
Conclusion of this book
393(28)
Appendix
396(7)
An Abstract of...a Treatise of Human Nature
403(18)
PART 3: SUPPLEMNTARY MATERIAL
Editors' Annotations
421(149)
Annotations to the Treatise
423(143)
Annotations to the Abstract
566(4)
Glossary 570(15)
References 585(10)
Index 595

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