9780415179416

The Age of Reasons: Quixotism, Sentimentalism, and Political Economy in Eighteenth Century Britain

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  • ISBN13:

    9780415179416

  • ISBN10:

    0415179416

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1998-08-13
  • Publisher: Routledge
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Summary

Wendy Motooka contends that the "Age of Reason" was actually an Age of Reasons. Joining imaginative literature, moral philosophy, and the emerging discourse of the new science, she seeks to historicize the meaning of eighteenth-century "reason" and its supposed opposites: quixotism and sentimentalism. Reading novels by the Fieldings, Lennox and Sterne alongside the works of Adam Smith, Motooka argues that today's social sciences are the legacy of sentimentalism.

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix(2)
List of abbreviations xi
Introduction: the quixotic problem 1(31)
Defining the quixotic 2(4)
The quixotic case of Captain Mostyn 6(11)
Quixotism, feeling and sentimentalism 17(11)
Sentimentalism and the "science of man" 28(4)
1 Turning authority into jest: tyrants, pedants, quixotes and enthusiasts in the early eighteenth century
32(42)
Ridicule, reason and revolution
33(5)
Reason in context: quixotism and arbitrary power
38(6)
Quixotism and the Sacheverell affair
44(9)
Universal quixotism
53(9)
Rebellious subjects: gender, arbitrary power and the natural order
62(12)
2 Common sense, moral sense and nonsense: sentimentalism and the empirical study of invisible things
74(51)
Authority, romance and the Royal Society
76(18)
Seeing the "invisible union": empirical method, moral virtue and sentimental quixotism
94(15)
The knowledge of benevolence: sentimental quixotism and Sarah Fielding's David Simple
109(16)
3 Coming to a bad end: sentimentalism, The Female Quixote and the power of interest
125(17)
4 Seeing the general view: Henry Fielding and quixotic authorship
142(31)
Rational men and quixotic women
143(6)
Rational men and quixotic authorship
149(12)
Quixotism and Jacobitism
161(8)
Sentimentalism and Sophia's body
169(4)
5 De gustibus non est disputandum: Tristram Shandy and "the production of a rational Being"
173(25)
Certain standards of taste: Hume and Gerard
174(5)
Disputing against hobby-horses: Shandean rationality
179(12)
The "already written" law of "God and reason"
191(7)
6 Laying down the general rule: Adam Smith, impartial spectators and the philosopher's trade
198(33)
Imagined philosophy, Newtonian method and the laughing artisan
199(6)
Impartial spectators and the man within
205(15)
The Philosopher's trade
220(11)
Epilogue: "The grandsons of Adam Smith" 231(6)
Notes 237(25)
Bibliography 262(13)
Index 275

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