9780521570213

The Amazonian Languages

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780521570213

  • ISBN10:

    0521570212

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 1999-11-13
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Purchase Benefits
  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $240.00 Save up to $7.20
  • Buy New
    $232.80
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    SPECIAL ORDER: 1-2 WEEKS

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

The Amazon Basin is the least known and the most complex linguistic region in the world today. It is the home of some 300 languages many of which (often incompletely documented and mostly endangered) show properties that constitute exceptions to received ideas about linguistic universals. This book is the first in English to provide an accessible overview of this rich and exciting linguistic area. It will provide a basis for further research on Amazonian languages as well as a point of entry to important data for theoretical linguists.

Table of Contents

List of maps
xvii
List of contributors
xvii
Acknowledgements xx
List of abbreviations
xxi
Conventions followed xxiv
Introduction
1(22)
R. M. W. Dixon
Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald
Cultural background
3(4)
Linguistic diffusion
7(4)
Genetic relationship
11(5)
The punctuated equilibrium model
16(3)
Organization of this book
19(4)
Bibliography
20(3)
Carib
23(42)
Desmond C. Derbyshire
Introduction
23(3)
Phonology
26(5)
Segmental
26(1)
Phonotactics and suprasegmentals
26(2)
Morphophonology
28(3)
Morphology, particles and pronouns
31(23)
Inflectional morphology
31(1)
Person-marking affixes on verbs, nouns, adverbials and postpositions
32(5)
Tense, aspect, mode and number suffixes on verbs
37(3)
Possession, tense and number suffixes on nouns
40(2)
Inflectional suffixes on locative postpositions
42(1)
Derivational morphology
43(1)
Verb derivational affixes
44(1)
Nominalizing affixes attached to verb stems to form nouns
45(5)
Some adverbial derivations from noun and verb stems
50(3)
The particle word class
53(1)
Pronouns
53(1)
Syntax
54(11)
Main clause structuring
55(1)
Subordinate clause constructions
56(1)
Nominalizations
56(1)
Adverbializations
57(1)
Postpositions
58(2)
Ergativity
60(1)
Bibliography
61(4)
The Arawak language family
65(42)
Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald
Introduction: the Arawak languages and their speakers
65(10)
Comparative studies, genetic classification and subgrouping
73(2)
Phonology
75(5)
Segmental phonology
75(3)
Syllable structure, suprasegmentals and phonotactics
78(1)
Morphophonology
79(1)
Typological profile
80(2)
Word structure
80(1)
Morphological processes
80(1)
Word classes
81(1)
Nominal morphology
82(3)
Possession
82(1)
Classifiers and genders
83(1)
Number
84(1)
Closed classes: personal pronouns, demonstratives, interrogatives, numbers, adpositions
85(1)
Verbal morphology
85(11)
Classification of verbs and predicate structure
86(1)
Cross-referencing and split ergativity
87(3)
Valency-changing derivations
90(3)
Other verbal categories
93(2)
Noun incorporation
95(1)
Relative and negative markers
95(1)
Syntax
96(11)
Grammatical relations
96(1)
Noun phrase structure
96(1)
Complex predicates and serial verbs
97(1)
Constituent order
98(1)
Non-verbal clauses
98(1)
Complex sentences: relative clauses, complement clauses, coordination, pivot and switch-reference
99(2)
Grammatical means used for marking discourse functions
101(1)
Bibliography
102(5)
Tupi
107(18)
Aryon D. Rodrigues
Introduction
107(3)
Phonology
110(4)
Vowels
110(2)
Consonants
112(2)
Tone
114(1)
Grammatical overview
114(1)
Nouns
115(2)
Pronouns
117(1)
Verbs
118(2)
Demonstratives
120(1)
Questions
120(1)
Subordinate clauses
121(1)
Pivots
121(4)
Bibliography
122(3)
Tupi-Guarani
125(40)
Cheryl Jensen
Introduction
125(3)
Identification of Tupi-Guarani languages
128(5)
Distinguishing characteristics of Tupi-Guarani languages
128(1)
Subgroups within Tupi-Guarani
129(4)
Proto-Tupi-Guarani phonology
133(4)
Proto-Tupi-Guarani phonemes
133(1)
Proto-Tupi-Guarani allomorphs
134(1)
Possible Tupi-Guarani morphophonemic phenomena
135(1)
Replacement by nasal consonants
135(1)
Strategies for the loss of consonant clusters formed at morpheme juncture
136(1)
Phonological changes within Tupi-Guarani
137(9)
Weakening of *tf and *ts
137(1)
Palatalization
138(2)
Labialization
140(1)
Merger of *β with *w
141(1)
Final-consonant phenomena
142(1)
Devoicing
142(1)
Nasalization
143(1)
Loss
143(1)
Vowel shift
144(2)
Stems
146(1)
Categories of stems
146(1)
Stem classes
146(1)
Person markers
146(2)
Nouns
148(5)
Case marking
148(2)
Possession
150(1)
Noun composition
151(1)
Indication of number
151(1)
Noun phrases
152(1)
Possession classes
152(1)
Postpositions
153(1)
Verbs
154(5)
Independent verbs
155(1)
Oblique-topicalized verbs
156(1)
Serial verb constructions
157(1)
Temporal subordinate clause constructions
157(1)
Valency-changing devices
158(1)
Causatives
158(1)
Detransitivizers
159(1)
Object incorporation
159(1)
Nominalizations
159(1)
Semantics
160(5)
Bibliography
161(4)
Macro-Je
165(42)
Aryon D. Rodrigues
Historical survey
165(1)
Distribution
166(3)
Linguistic scholarship
169(2)
Phonology
171(9)
Vocalic systems
171(3)
Consonantal systems
174(6)
Tone
180(1)
Morphology
180(7)
Inflection for contiguity of a determiner
180(2)
Inflection for possession
182(1)
Number
183(1)
Noun classification
184(1)
Agreement marking on the verb
185(2)
Syntax
187(11)
Constituent order in declarative sentences
187(1)
Adpositional phrases
188(2)
Genitive phrases
190(2)
Demonstrative phrases
192(1)
Numeral phrases
192(1)
Adjectival phrases
193(1)
Ergativity
193(2)
Valency-changing processes
195(1)
Reflexives and reciprocals
195(1)
Causativization
195(2)
Switch-reference
197(1)
About the consistency of Macro-Je as a genetic group
198(9)
A brief appraisal of the grammatical affinity
198(1)
Phonological equations
198(3)
Bibliography
201(6)
Tucano
207(20)
Janet Barnes
Introduction
207(2)
Phonology
209(3)
Syllable structure
210(1)
Segmental phonology
210(1)
Nasalization
211(1)
Accent
212(1)
Morphology
212(12)
The verb
213(1)
Evidentials
213(1)
Aspect
214(2)
Mood and modality
216(1)
Pronouns
217(1)
Personal pronouns
217(1)
Possessive pronouns
218(1)
Classifiers
218(1)
Specificity marker
219(2)
Nouns
221(1)
Adjectives
221(1)
Negation
222(1)
Nominalized verbs
222(1)
Switch-reference
223(1)
Syntax
224(3)
Time and location
224(1)
Noun phrase
225(1)
Bibliography
225(2)
Pano
227(24)
Eugene E. Loos
Introduction
227(3)
Phonology
230(4)
Segmental phonology
230(1)
Common phonological variations
231(3)
Grammar
234(17)
Word classes and noun phrase formation
234(1)
Noun phrase
235(1)
Pronoun classes
235(1)
Relative clauses
236(1)
Noun phrase pluralization
236(1)
Transitivity concord
236(1)
Switch-reference
237(2)
Adverbial suffix concord
239(1)
Locative phrases
239(1)
Ergative marking
240(3)
Noun incorporation
243(1)
Verb formation
243(1)
Verb roots
243(1)
Suffixes
244(4)
Mood indicators
248(1)
Deictics
248(1)
Bibliography
249(2)
Maku
251(18)
Silvana
Valteir Martins
Introduction
251(2)
Genetic classification
253(2)
Phonology
255(2)
Word structure
257(1)
Word classes
257(1)
Nominal categories: possession, classifiers, number
258(1)
Verb structure
259(1)
Valency-changing derivations
260(1)
Incorporation
261(2)
Grammatical relations
263(1)
Negation
264(1)
Syntax
265(1)
Lexicon
265(4)
Bibliography
266(3)
Nambiquara
269(24)
Ivan Lowe
Introduction
269(2)
Phonology
271(2)
The variants of phonemes
272(1)
Syllable structure
272(1)
Stress
272(1)
Morphophonemics
272(1)
Morphology
273(11)
Verbs
274(1)
Main verbs
274(3)
Subordinate verbs
277(2)
Adjectives
279(1)
Nouns
280(3)
Pronouns
283(1)
Adverbs
283(1)
Interjections
284(1)
Ideophones
284(1)
Syntax
284(9)
Main clauses
284(3)
Subordinate clauses
287(1)
Clause coordination
288(1)
Noun phrases
289(1)
Nominalizations
290(1)
Bibliography
291(2)
Arawa
293(14)
R. M. W. Dixon
Introduction
293(2)
Phonology
295(3)
Word classes
298(1)
Nouns
298(1)
Noun phrase structure
299(1)
Verbs
300(1)
Predicate structure
300(2)
Pronouns
302(2)
Demonstratives and interrogatives
304(1)
Construction types
304(3)
Bibliography
306(1)
Small language families and isolates in Peru
307(34)
Mary Ruth Wise
Introduction: the languages and families
307(5)
Phonology
312(6)
Morphology
318(11)
Nominal morphology
319(1)
Classifiers
319(1)
Case
320(1)
Pronouns
321(2)
Adjectives
323(1)
Comparative and superlative grades
323(1)
Verbal morphology
324(5)
Syntax
329(12)
Constituent order
329(3)
Relativization
332(1)
Subordination and coreference/switch-reference
333(2)
Bibliography
335(6)
Other small families and isolates
341(44)
Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald
R. M. Dixon
Brazil
341(23)
Yanomami
341(4)
Phonology
345(1)
Word structure and word classes
346(1)
Nominal categories
346(1)
Classifiers
347(1)
Grammatical relations
348(1)
Verb structure
349(1)
Noun incorporation and verb compounding
350(1)
Syntax
350(1)
Trumai by Raquel Guirardello
351(1)
Phonology
352(1)
Features of the grammar
352(1)
Mura-Piraha
353(1)
Phonology
354(1)
Features of the grammar
355(2)
Jabuti
357(1)
Phonology
357(1)
Features of the grammar
357(1)
Chapacura family
358(1)
Phonology
359(1)
Features of the grammar
359(2)
Maku
361(1)
Aikana and Koaia
362(2)
Bolivia
364(5)
The Tacana family
364(1)
Phonology
365(1)
Features of the grammar
366(1)
Isolates
367(2)
Colombia
369(8)
Phonology
370(2)
Morphology
372(1)
Word structure and typological profile
372(1)
Nominal morphology
373(2)
Grammatical relations
375(1)
Verbal morphology
375(1)
Syntax
376(1)
Venezuela
377(8)
Phonology
377(1)
Features of the grammar
378(1)
Bibliography
379(6)
Areal diffusion and language contact in the Icana-Vaupes basin, north-west Amazonia
385(32)
Alexandra Y. Aikhenvald
Areal diffusion in north-west Amazonia
385(1)
Linguistic situation in the Icana-Vaupes basin
386(5)
Languages spoken
386(2)
Cultural setting and language attitudes
388(2)
Historical evidence
390(1)
The Vaupes region as a linguistic area
391(15)
General observations
391(3)
Phonological characteristics
394(2)
Grammatical structure
396(1)
Typological profile and word structure
396(1)
Nominal morphology
397(6)
Grammatical relations
403(1)
Verbal morphology and predicate structure
404(1)
Syntax and discourse techniques
405(1)
Semantics
406(1)
Properties shared by languages of the Icana and Vaupes region
406(5)
Pitch accent
406(1)
Topic-advancing verbal derivation
407(2)
Possessive classifiers and -ya-possessive marker
409(1)
Complex systems of classifiers
410(1)
Conclusions
411(6)
Bibliography
413(4)
The Upper Xingu as an incipient linguistic area
417(14)
Lucy Seki
The Upper Xingu and its languages
417(6)
Languages spoken
417(2)
Historical background
419(4)
The mobility of groups, language loss and further contacts
423(1)
The Upper Xingu as a culture area
423(1)
Linguistic situation
424(2)
Incipient areal diffusion in the Upper Xingu
426(2)
Conclusions
428(3)
Bibliography
428(3)
Index of authors 431(5)
Index of languages and language families 436(9)
Subject index 445

Rewards Program

Write a Review