9780252071164

American Datelines : Major News Stories from Colonial Times to the Present

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780252071164

  • ISBN10:

    0252071166

  • Edition: Reprint
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2003-02-01
  • Publisher: Univ of Illinois Pr
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Summary

"Capturing history as it unfolded, American Datelines reveals the courage, hope, and grit of the American experience as chronicled in the headlines of the nation's public press from the earliest issue of The Boston News-Letter to major newspapers of today.The original articles in this compelling collection are arranged chronologically and appear as they were first published, providing a lively and unique view of the events that have most influenced American politics and culture. This first paperback edition features an updated introduction and newsworthy additions, including the fall of the Berlin Wall, the O. J. Simpson trial, the Clinton impeachment trial, the home run race between Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa, and Bush v. Gore."

Table of Contents

Introduction xxi
1704
The Boston News-Letter reports pirates off the coast of Rhode Island
1(1)
1734
John Peter Zenger tells the readers of his New York Weekly Journal about his arrest on a charge of seditious libel
2(1)
1735
Nine months later, Zenger uses the pages of The New York Weekly Journal to announce a victory for the principle of freedom of the press
3(1)
1755
The New York Mercury reports the massacre of British and colonial troops at Fort Duquesne, Pennsylvania
4(2)
1771
Writing under the nom de plume ``Candidus,'' John Adams prods the readers of The Boston Gazette and Country Journal to throw off the yoke of the British Parliament
6(1)
1773
The Massachusetts Gazette and Boston News-Letter recounts the ``Boston tea party''
7(1)
1775
Isaiah Thomas' Massachusetts Spy reports on the first shots of the Revolutionary War
8(3)
1776
At the nadir of the Continental Army's fortunes, the first of Thomas Paine's ``Crisis Papers'' appears in Dunlap's Pennsylvania Packet or the General Advertiser
11(3)
1787
The Pennsylvania Mercury reports a local story---the final session of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia
14(1)
Using the pseudonym ``Publius,'' Alexander Hamilton writes the first of The Federalist Papers in which he urges the readers, of The New York Independent Journal to support adoption of the new Constitution
15(2)
1798
The co-editors of The New York Time Piece attack the passage of the Sedition Act
17(2)
1803
A young Washington Irving satirizes a troupe of actors in the pages of the New York Morning Chronicle
19(2)
1804
The New York Evening Post tells of the death of its publisher, Alexander Hamilton, following his duel with Aaron Burr
21(2)
Five days later, the anti-Federalist New York Morning Chronicle stresses the fairness of the Hamilton-Burr confrontation
23(1)
1812
Using the ship's log as its source, The Boston Gazette breaks the news of the U.S.S. Constitution's defeat of the British frigate Guerriere
24(2)
1815
Andrew Jackson tells the readers of Washington, D.C.'s Daily National Intelligencer of the American victory over the British at the Battle of New Orleans
26(2)
1831
Serving as a clearinghouse for reports from Virginia papers on the scene, The Washington Globe describes the grisly slave rebellion led by Nat Turner
28(2)
1833
The first affordable, frankly low-brow ``penny press,'' Benjamin Day's New York Sun, hits the streets of New York, bringing news to the masses
30(2)
1836
The fall of the Alamo, as told nearly three week later by The San Felipe de Austin Telegraph and Texas Register
32(2)
1838
Technology has shrunk the world as the first transatlantic steamship crossing is reported by The New York Morning Herald
34(2)
1840
Edgar Allen Poe analyzes a murder trial for Alexander's Weekly Messenger
36(2)
1844
The Baltimore Patriot and Commercial Gazette informs its readers of the ``annihilation of space'' with the first use of Samuel Morse's telegraph
38(1)
1848
San Francisco's Californian breaks the news of the discovery of gold at Sutter's Mill near what is now Sacramento, California
39(1)
1849
Life aboard a westward-bound wagon train, as printed in The Cincinnati Argus
40(1)
1855
William Lloyd Garrison, one of the leading abolitionist publishers, rails against the immorality of slavery in the pages of his newspaper, The Liberator
41(3)
1857
The Washington Evening Star covers the Supreme Court's infamous decision in the Dred Scott case
44(2)
1859
The Baltimore Patriot provides its readers with a first-hand look at John Brown's raid at nearby Harper's Ferry
46(3)
1861
With breathless enthusiasm, The Charleston Daily Courier happily follows the opening battle of the Civil War and the shelling of Fort Sumter
49(3)
The Richmond Dispatch reports on the rout of the Army of the Potomac at the First Battle of Bull Run
52(3)
1863
The siege and eventual fall of Vicksburg, Mississippi, as reported from within that beleaguered city by The Vicksburg Daily Citizen
55(2)
The ``high tide'' of the Confederacy, the Battle of Gettysburg, is chronicled in the pages of Washington, D.C.'s National Intelligencer
57(3)
The New York Tribune describes the New York draft riots, the bloodiest ever to occur in the United States
60(3)
1865
The telegraph allows The San Francisco Daily Dramatic Chronicle to bring news of Abraham Lincoln's assassination to west coast readers within hours of John Wilkes Booth's shot being fired
63(2)
1869
A reporter for San Francisco's Alta California paints a picture of a bucolic west doomed to oblivion by the imminent joining of the rails at Promontory, Utah
65(2)
But as The Alta California editorialized after the job was done, the United States physically had become one nation, joined from coast to coast by twin ribbons of steel
67(2)
1871
The New York Times exposes the corrupt practices of William M. ``Boss'' Tweed and his Tammany Ring
69(3)
1876
Samuel Clemens, a former newspaperman, lampoons the long-winded writing style of his contemporaries in the Ventura Free Press
72(1)
General George Armstrong Custer's ``last stand'' is reported by The Bozeman [Montana] Avant Courier and reflected upon by The St. Louis Republican
73(2)
1882
The shooting of the outlaw Jesse James is reported by The St. Louis Post-Dispatch
75(5)
1885
The Boston Transcript covers the removal from the shelves of the Concord, Massachusetts, Public Library of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
80(1)
1886
Labor unrest explodes into the Haymarket Riot as reported in the pages of Chicago's Inter-Ocean
81(4)
1887
Walt Whitman recalls his news-papering days for the New Orleans Picayune
85(1)
1888
The mighty Casey strikes out for the first time in the pages of The San Francisco Examiner
86(3)
1889
The Pittsburgh Dispatch describes the devastation in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, following the collapse of a dam on the Conemaugh River
89(4)
1890
The sponsoring New York World runs the story of Nellie Bly's successful finish to her 'round-the-world journey
93(3)
1898
William Randolph Hearst's New York Evening Journal recounts the mysterious destruction of the U.S.S. Maine in Havana harbor
96(3)
Barely noticed by the hometown Detroit Free Press, the first horseless carriage appears on the streets of the Michigan city
99(1)
Hearst's east- and west-coast flagships, The New York Evening Journal and The San Francisco Examiner, describe the Battle of Caney
100(3)
1900
The Jackson [Mississippi] Daily Clarion-Ledger recounts the train wreck which took the life of legendary Illinois Central engineer John Luther ``Casey'' Jones
103(1)
1903
The Washington Post reports on the creation of the nation of Panama to provide a friendly ``host'' for a canal joining the Atlantic and Pacific oceans
104(2)
Man takes to the skies, as the aptly-named Norfolk Virginian-Pilot describes the adventures of the Wright brothers on the dunes of Kitty Hawk, North Carolina
106(3)
The inferno that was Chicago's Iroquois Theatre fire is depicted by that city's Inter-Ocean
109(5)
1904
An astonished Boston Daily Globe describes Red Sox pitcher Cy Young's perfect-game victory over the Philadelphia Athletics
114(2)
1905
The socialist weekly, Appeal to Reason, begins serializing The Jungle, social reformer Upton Sinclair's story about the squalor and degradation faced by foreign immigrants to urban America
116(4)
1906
In a unique show of publishing cooperation, three San Francisco dailies, under the name The Call-Chronicle-Examiner, tell a story of a city left in ruins by a massive earthquake and fire
120(4)
1909
The New York Times breaks the story of Robert E. Peary's discovery of the North Pole
124(4)
1910
Writing in The New York Herald, Jack London describes the defeat of ``The Great White Hope,'' Jim Jeffries, at the hands of black boxer Jack Johnson
128(3)
1911
In covering the Supreme Court's decision in the Standard Oil case, The New York Tribune reported on the dawn of legislation by the judiciary
131(3)
1912
The anti-labor Boston Daily Globe shows its bias in describing the bloody workers' strike called against the American Woolen Mills of Lawrence, Massachusetts
134(4)
1913
The New York Times reviews the ``Armory Show,'' a glittering event which forever altered the attitudes of Americans toward the world of art
138(7)
1914
The Detroit News reflects the astonishment of local workers over Henry Ford's intention to double the wages of his employees to $5 per day
145(2)
1915
A German U-boat sinks the R.M.S. Lusitania off the coast of Ireland, as told in the pages of The New York Tribune
147(6)
The mob-lynching of Leo Frank is reported by The Atlanta Journal
153(5)
1918
The Washington Post covers Woodrow Wilson's famed ``fourteen points,'' as the President informs Congress of American aims in ``the war to end all wars''
158(4)
Cub reporter Ernest Hemingway contrasts gaiety and gloom at a soldiers' dance for the Kansas City Star
162(2)
War correspondent Wilbur Forrest of The New York Tribune covers the carnage of the Battle of Chateau Thierry on France's River Marne
164(1)
With Germany finally defeated, the terms of the Armistice ending the First World War are announced by William Randolph Hearst's Los Angeles Evening Herald
165(2)
1919
Chicago Daily News reporter Carl Sandburg reflects on the causes of the previous day's race riot
167(2)
1920
The Washington Post carries the Associated Press' roundup of suspected ``reds'' following the ``Palmer Raids.''
169(4)
The Knoxville Journal and Tribune announces the vote of the Tennessee Legislature that elevates the suffrage rights of American women to constitutional stature
173(2)
The ``Black Sox Scandal'' is reported by the hometown Chicago Daily News
175(5)
1924
The most famous opening paragraph in American sports reporting was penned by Grantland Rice of The New York Herald-Tribune following Notre Dame's defeat of Army at the Polo Grounds
180(3)
1925
The ``Monkey Trial,'' matching skilled orator William Jennings Bryan against master litigator Clarence Darrow is reported by The Chattanooga Daily Times
183(3)
Ring Lardner offers his views on horses in a sly, slangy letter to the editor of the New York World
186(2)
1926
The Baltimore Sun's H. L. Mencken analyzes the importance of Rudolph Valentino, a week after the silent film star's death
188(2)
1927
No matter that few could receive its flickering image, The New York Times covers the dawning of the age of television
190(3)
Damon Runyon covers the Ruth Snyder-Henry Judd Gray murder trial for the New York American
193(5)
Edwin L. James of The New York Times is on hand at Le Bourget airfield outside of Paris when Charles Lindbergh's ``Spirit of St. Louis'' lands
198(4)
The Boston Daily Globe reports on the electrocutions of professed anarchists and convicted murderers Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti
202(5)
Babe Ruth's record-setting 60th home run is recorded by The New York Times
207(3)
1929
The epitome of prohibition-era gangland violence, ``The St. Valentine's Day Massacre,'' is described by The Chicago Herald Examiner
210(4)
Oscar's first night, the inaugural presentation of the awards ceremony of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, is reported by The Los Angeles Times
214(1)
The Wall Street Journal reassures its readers that the worst is over following the stock market collapse of ``Black Tuesday''
215(2)
1931
A New York Times reporter shares his thoughts while standing atop the Empire State Building, shortly after its opening
217(2)
1932
Columnist Walter Lippmann renders a spectacularly wrong assessment of a presidential candidate
219(3)
Seventy-two days after the kidnaping, The New York Herald-Tribune announces that the body of the son of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh has been found
222(5)
1935
The Los Angeles Illustrated News reports on the air crash that took the life of America's cowboy philosopher, Will Rogers
227(2)
The Christian Science Monitor covers the signing into law of the Social Security Act, the keystone of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's ``New Deal.''
229(5)
Legendary New York Times theater critic Brooks Atkinson attends the opening of ``Porgy and Bess,'' George Gershwin's farewell to Broadway
234(2)
1936
John Steinbeck, freelancing for The San Francisco News, chronicles the plight of migrant farm laborers in California
236(4)
1938
Irving Kolodin of The New York Sun is present when jazz comes of age at the Carnegie Hall concert of the Benny Goodman Quintet
240(2)
The one-round mauling of Max Schmeling by ``The Brown Bomber,'' Joe Louis, is reported by The New York Journal and American's Jimmy Cannon
242(2)
The San Francisco Chronicle tells of the hysteria that followed the prank broadcast of Orson Welles' ``War of the Worlds''
244(3)
1939
``Building the World of Tomorrow,'' the opening of the New York World's Fair is reported by The New York Daily News
247(4)
Walter Winchell of The New York Daily Mirror describes the surrender to him of public enemy Louis ``Lepke'' Buchalter
251(1)
The Atlanta Constitution depicts the excitement in its home town as Margaret Mitchell's Gone With The Wind premieres
252(4)
1941
Stanley Frank of The New York Post marks the passing of ``The Iron Horse,'' baseball great Lou Gehrig
256(2)
Gordon Cobbledick of The Cleveland Plain Dealer reports on the end of the greatest of all baseball records, Joe DiMaggio's 56 game hitting streak
258(1)
The Honolulu Star-Bulletin covers ``The Day of Infamy,'' as Japanese warplanes bomb Hawaii
259(4)
1942
The Japanese American Citizen League's Pacific Citizen describes the relocation of Japanese-Americans to concentration camps during World War II
263(2)
The turning point in the war in the Pacific, the Battle of Midway, is reported by The San Diego Tribune-Sun, hometown paper of the Pacific Fleet
265(2)
1943
The opening of Oklahoma!, the first Broadway musical to integrate successfully book, music, lyric and dance, is reviewed by The New York Herald-Tribune's Howard Barnes
267(1)
1944
Columnist Ernest Taylor ``Ernie'' Pyle's most famous piece, chronicling the death of Army Captain Henry T. Waskow, is released by the Scripps-Howard syndicate
268(2)
A report on D-Day, the long-promised Allied landings in Normandy, appears in Stars and Stripes, the American military's own newspaper
270(3)
The rise of one of America's first ``pop'' heroes, Frank Sinatra, is recounted in this review of the crooner's Paramount Theater concert by The New York Daily News
273(2)
1945
Before the American flag was firmly planted on Iwo Jima, there was much bloody fighting below, as reported by Pulitzer Prize winner Homer Bigart of The New York Herald-Tribune
275(2)
Quietly elegant in its simplicity, this New York Post obituary of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt appeared among the troops of whom he was the Commander-in-Chief
277(1)
A month after 60 percent of the Japanese city of Hiroshima was destroyed by a single American atomic bomb, New York Times correspondent W.H. Lawrence describes the devastation
278(4)
1947
The Baltimore Afro-American looks at Jackie Robinson as he becomes the first black major league baseball player
282(3)
1950
The Wheeling Intelligencer reports on Wisconsin Senator Joseph McCarthy's attempts to foment a ``red scare''
285(1)
1953
Developed by a University of Pittsburgh research team led by Dr. Jonas Salk, the announcement of the first polio vaccine made page one news in The Pittsburgh Press
286(2)
1954
Gossip columnist Louella Parsons, writing in The San Francisco Examiner, gushes over the marriage of movie star Marilyn Monroe and baseball idol Joe DiMaggio
288(3)
The Topeka Capital Daily explains that the Supreme Court's landmark desegregation decision in Brown v. Board of Education will have ``Little Effect On Topeka''
291(2)
1955
Jerry Hulse of The Los Angeles Times reports on the opening of ``The Happiest Place on Earth,'' Disneyland
293(2)
1957
Associated Press reporter Relman Morin's Pulitzer Prize--winning story on the integration of Little Rock, Arkansas' Central High School, as it appeared in The Los Angeles Times
295(3)
1960
The regional news page of The Charlotte Observer tells of attempts by student protests to integrate a Greensboro, North Carolina, lunch counter
298(1)
The Washington Post covers the admission by the American government that it lied about the flight of Gary Powers's U-2 spy plane over the Soviet Union
299(4)
Almost alone among American newspapers, The New York Times ran a small story about the Food and Drug Administration's approval of a drug called ``Enovid,'' the first birth control pill
303(1)
1962
During the height of the Cuban missile crisis, Anthony Lewis of The New York Times covers President John F. Kennedy's announcement about an American arms blockade of that Caribbean nation
304(3)
1963
``The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom,'' which attracted 200,000 civil rights demonstrators to the capital's Mall, is described by The Washington Post
307(4)
United Press International reporter Merriman Smith's Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy conveys the fast-breaking nature of news
311(10)
1964
Tongue in cheek, The Christian Science Monitor warns of a new British invasion, the coming of the Beatles
321(2)
The Gulf of Tonkin Incident, marking the point of no return for American military involvement in Southeast Asia, is chronicled by Tom Wicker of The New York Times
323(2)
1965
The Montgomery Advertiser reports on the arrival of a civil rights march from Selma, Alabama, led
325(3)
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
1967
The Green Bay Packers show who's boss in Los Angeles Times sports editor Paul Zimmerman's coverage of the Super Bowl
328(1)
1968
Following the Tet Offensive, The Des Moines Register revealed to its readers that despite repeated promises of ``light at the end of the tunnel,'' no part of South Vietnam was immune from enemy attack
329(4)
The assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. by a sniper's bullet is described by The Memphis Commercial Appeal
333(3)
1969
Moon-walker Neil Armstrong's ``one giant leap for mankind'' reported by The Orlando Sentinel
336(3)
Alfred G. Aronowitz of The New York Post tries to put the Wood-stock rock concert into perspective
339(2)
1971
The New York Times explains why the Supreme Court ruled in its favor in ``The Pentagon Papers'' case
341(5)
1972
Watergate, the ``third-rate burglary'' that eventually would lead to the downfall of a presidency, was covered by veteran Washington Post police reporter Alfred E. Lewis
346(2)
1974
Twenty-seven months after the Watergate burglary, Carroll Kilpatrick of The Washington Post describes the final moments of the administration of the first president to resign from office
348(3)
1978
San Francisco Chronicle correspondent Keith Power tells of the horror following the mass suicide at Jonestown, Guyana
351(3)
1979
The Philadelphia Inquirer, which was to earn a Pulitzer Prize for its coverage of the incident, prints its first story about the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island
354(3)
1982
Prior to the word ``AIDS'' entering the language, Randy Shilts of The San Francisco Chronicle writes the first story of illnesses collectively called ``GRID''---gay-related immuno-deficiency diseases
357(3)
The Salt Lake City Tribune covers the implantation of the first mechanical heart into a living human being
360(4)
1984
The Democrats make history by picking Congresswoman Geraldine Ferraro of New York as their vice-presidential candidate, an event reported in her hometown Long Island paper, Newsday
364(2)
1986
The Santa Fe New Mexican appraises the contribution of Georgia O'Keeffe to American art
366(3)
1989
In the frigid waters of Alaska's Prince William Sound, the ecological disaster that couldn't happen did, as The Anchorage Daily News reported in its coverage of the Valdez oil spill
369(4)
New York Times correspondent Serge Schmemann captures something of the emotional as well as the epochal in his account of the fall of the Berlin Wall. For decades the symbol of tyranny and repression, the wall's demise signaled the end of a once-escalating high-stakes conflict. Perhaps, finally, the cold war and its nuclear fears of superpowers annihilating one another could be consigned to the pages of history
373(2)
1990
Obscene and pornographic was the judgment of a grand jury playing art critic in weighing several of Robert Mapple-thorpe's photographs on view at Cincinnati's Contemporary Arts Center. The Cincinnati Enquirer's Jane Prendergast reports the grand jury's indictment, a legal finding that would help trigger a ``culture war'' between government officials and edgy artists invoking such passionate issues as free speech and federal funding of the arts
375(2)
1991
In a heartfelt obituary, San Diego Union-Tribune staff writers John Wilkens and Robert P. Laurence look back on the colorful life of Theodor Geisel, better known to millions of young readers as Dr. Seuss
377(3)
1995
The so-called trial of the century ended with a verdict of ``not guilty.'' After more than 15 months of sensationalistic journalism and an avidly watched televised trial that sometimes seemed more crime fiction than serious legal inquiry, football great O. J. Simpson was free. However, the proceedings had polarized the country, the charge of a racist Los Angeles Police Department a key component in Simpson's winning defense. Jim Newton of the Los Angeles Times examines the verdict in the wake of the long, divisive trial
380(2)
1997
Though more than a few sports pundits predicted that 21-year-old Tiger Woods would buckle under the pressures of competing in golf's classic Masters tournament, Woods proved them wrong. He became the first person of African American descent to capture the Masters, doing it with style and grace. Glenn Sheeley of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution looks at Woods's historic win
382(2)
1998
The battle between Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa to beat Roger Maris's 37-year-old single-season home run record of 61 took on epic proportions from April through September in 1998. Rich Hummel of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch recounts the outcome of this intense yet gentlemanly battle, announcing which man has triumphed as the modern ``Sultan of Swat.''
384(1)
1999
Controversy was nothing new to the presidency of Bill Clinton. However, his private and personal affairs, fueled by charges of insider trading and extramarital hanky-panky, reached Promethean proportions when he was impeached. Peter Baker and Helen Dewar of the Washington Post report the outcome of President Clinton's trial by the U.S. Senate
385(2)
2000
It was a political cliff-hanger that seemingly would not end, the post-Election Day battle between the Democratic candidate, Vice President Al Gore, and the Republican standard-bearer, Texas governor George W. Bush. The battleground was Florida, its 25 electoral votes defiantly claimed by both candidates. In the weeks after the polls closed, Americans would become familiar with such formerly arcane terms as ``butterfly ballot'' and ``pregnant chad.'' Finally, after more than a month without a president-elect, a U.S. Supreme Court ruling effectively handed the victory to Bush
387(4)
Newspapers and syndicates represented in this volume
391(6)
Acknowledgments 397(4)
Index 401

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