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Art History Revised Art History Volume 2,9780131455290
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Art History Revised Art History Volume 2

by
Edition:
3rd
ISBN13:

9780131455290

ISBN10:
013145529X
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2008
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $125.00

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Summary

For two-semester courses in Art History, Global Art History, and for Introductory Art courses taught from a historical perspective. Renowned for its authorship, scholarship and pedagogy, Art History has quickly become the gold standard of introductions to the history of art. Engaging and accessible, Stokstad's Art History gives students rich cultural and social contexts for art, along with eloquent explanations of art's formal qualities and particular terminology. Presenting a broad view of art through the centuries, it introduces beginning students to the works of all artists in all media in a positive and sympathetic manner. Art History is the most comprehensive, accessible, and magnificently illustrated work of its kind.

Table of Contents

Preface xi
Expanded Ancillary Package xv
Art History Interactive xvii
Use Notes xxi
Starter Kit xxiii
Introduction xxix
Early Renaissance Art in Europe
577(68)
The Renaissance and Humanism
578(5)
Art of the French Ducal Courts
583(6)
Manuscript Illumination
584(3)
Painting and Sculpture for the Chartreuse de Champmol
587(1)
Flamboyant-Style Architecture
588(1)
Art of Flanders
589(17)
First-Generation Panel Painters
591(6)
Second-Generation Panel Painters
597(5)
Luxury Arts
602(4)
The Spread of the Flemish Style
606(2)
The Iberian Peninsula
606(1)
France
607(1)
Germany
608(1)
The Graphic Arts
608(2)
Art of Italy
610(35)
Architecture and Its Decoration
611(11)
Sculpture
622(6)
Painting
628(17)
Renaissance Art in Sixteenth-Century Europe
645(74)
Europe in the Sixteenth Century
646(1)
The Changing Status of Artists
647(1)
Italy in the Early Sixteenth Century: The Classical Phase of the Renaissance
647(24)
Three Great Artists of the Early Sixteenth Century
648(14)
Architecture in Rome and the Vatican
662(2)
Architecture and Painting in Northern Italy
664(7)
The Renaissance and Reformation in Germany
671(11)
Early-Sixteenth-Century Sculpture
672(3)
Early-Sixteenth-Century Painting and Printmaking
675(5)
The Reformation and the Arts
680(2)
Late-Sixteenth-Century Architecture and Art in Italy
682(20)
Architecture in Rome and the Vatican
682(3)
Michelangelo and Titian
685(5)
Italian Mannerism
690(5)
Women Painters
695(2)
Painting and Architecture in Venice and the Veneto
697(5)
Renaissance Art in France
702(3)
Painting
702(1)
Architecture and Its Decoration
702(3)
Renaissance Art in Spain
705(2)
Architecture
705(1)
Painting
705(2)
Renaissance Painting in the Netherlands
707(5)
Renaissance Art in England
712(7)
Painting
713(2)
Architecture
715(4)
Baroque Art in Europe and North America
719(68)
The Baroque Period
720(2)
Italy
722(17)
Urban Design, Architecture, and Architectural Sculpture
722(8)
Independent Sculpture
730(1)
Illusionistic Ceiling Painting
730(3)
Painting on Canvas
733(6)
France
739(7)
Architecture and Its Decoration at Versailles
739(4)
Painting
743(3)
Habsburg Germany and Austria
746(1)
Habsburg Spain
747(8)
Architecture
749(1)
Painting
749(6)
Spanish Colonies in the Americas
755(3)
The Southern Netherlands/Flanders
758(6)
The Northern Netherlands/United Dutch Republic
764(14)
Portraits
764(6)
Views of the World
770(5)
Genre Painting
775(3)
Still Lifes and Flower Pieces
778(1)
England
778(5)
Architecture and Landscape Design
779(4)
English Colonies in North America
783(4)
Architecture
783(1)
Painting
784(3)
Art of India After 1200
787(14)
Late Medieval Period
788(4)
Buddhist Art
788(1)
Jain Art
789(2)
Hindu Art
791(1)
Mughal Period
792(7)
Mughal Architecture
792(1)
Mughal Painting
793(1)
Rajput Painting
794(5)
Modern Period
799(2)
Chinese Art After 1280
801(16)
The Mongol Invasions
802(1)
Yuan Dynasty
803(4)
Ming Dynasty
807(6)
Court and Professional Painting
807(1)
Decorative Arts and Gardens
808(1)
Architecture and City Planning
809(1)
Literati Painting
810(3)
Qing Dynasty
813(1)
Orthodox Painting
813(1)
Individualist Painting
814(1)
The Modern Period
814(3)
Japanese Art After 1392
817(20)
Muromachi Period
818(4)
Ink Painting
819(2)
The Zen Dry Garden
821(1)
Momoyama Period
822(4)
Architecture
823(1)
Kano School Decorative Painting
823(1)
The Tea Ceremony
824(2)
Edo Period
826(7)
The Tea Ceremony
826(1)
Rimpa School Painting
826(2)
Nanga School Painting
828(2)
Zen Painting
830(1)
Maruyama-Shijo School Painting
830(1)
Ukiyo-e: Pictures of the Floating World
831(2)
The Meiji and Modern Periods
833(4)
Art of the Americas After 1300
837(22)
Indigenous American Art
838(1)
Mexico and South America
839(6)
The Aztec Empire
839(3)
The Inca Empire
842(3)
North America
845(11)
Eastern Woodlands and the Great Plains
845(3)
The Northwest Coast
848(3)
The Southwest
851(5)
Contemporary Native American Artists
856(3)
Art of Pacific Cultures
859(16)
The Peopling of the Pacific
860(1)
Australia
861(1)
Melanesia
862(3)
Papua New Guinea
863(1)
Irian Jaya
863(2)
New Ireland
865(1)
Micronesia
865(1)
Polynesia
866(5)
Easter Island
866(1)
Marquesas Islands
867(1)
Hawaiian Islands
867(1)
New Zealand
868(3)
Recent Art in Oceania
871(4)
Art of Africa in the Modern Era
875(22)
Traditional and Contemporary Africa
876(3)
Living Areas
879(1)
Children and the Continuity of Life
879(4)
Initiation
881(2)
The Spirit World
883(3)
Leadership
886(4)
Death and Ancestors
890(2)
Contemporary Art
892(5)
Eighteenth-Century Art in Europe and North America
897(44)
The Enlightenment and Its Revolutions
898(1)
The Rococo Style in Europe
899(10)
Architecture and Its Decoration in Germany and Austria
900(2)
Painting in France
902(6)
Decorative Arts and Sculpture
908(1)
Art in Italy
909(4)
Art of the Grand Tour
909(3)
Neoclassicism in Rome
912(1)
Revivals and Romanticism in Britain
913(14)
Classical Revival in Architecture and Landscaping
913(3)
Gothic Revival in Architecture and Its Decoration
916(1)
Neoclassicism in Architecture and the Decorative Arts
917(2)
Painting
919(8)
Later Eighteenth-Century Art in France
927(7)
Architecture
927(2)
Painting and Sculpture
929(5)
Art in North America
934(7)
Architecture
934(2)
Painting
936(5)
Nineteenth-Century Art in Europe and the United States
941(78)
Europe and the United States in the Nineteenth Century
942(2)
Early-Nineteenth-Century Art: Neoclassicism and Romanticism
943(1)
Late-Nineteenth-Century Art: Realism and Antirealism
943(1)
Neoclassicism and Romanticism in France
944(9)
David and His Students
944(2)
Romantic Painting
946(6)
Romantic Sculpture
952(1)
Romanticism in Spain
953(1)
Romantic Landscape Painting in Europe
954(4)
Naturalistic, Romantic, and Neoclassical American Art
958(4)
Landscape and Genre Painting
959(1)
Sculpture
960(2)
Revival Styles in Architecture Before 1850
962(2)
Early Photography in Europe
964(3)
New Materials and Technology in Architecture at Midcentury
967(2)
French Academic Art and Architecture
969(2)
French Naturalism and Realism and Their Spread
971(6)
French Naturalism
971(2)
French Realism
973(2)
Naturalism and Realism Outside France
975(2)
Late-Nineteenth-Century Art in Britain
977(2)
Impressionism
979(14)
Later Impressionism
990(3)
Post-Impressionism
993(12)
Symbolism in Painting
998(4)
Late-Nineteenth-Century French Sculpture
1002(1)
Art Nouveau
1003(2)
Later Nineteenth-Century Art in the United States
1005(14)
Later Neoclassical Sculpture
1005(2)
Landscape Painting and Photography
1007(2)
Civil War Photography and Sculpture
1009(1)
Post-Civil War Realism
1009(2)
Urban Photography
1011(3)
Religious Art
1014(1)
Architecture
1014(5)
The Rise of Modernism in Europe and North America
1019(64)
Europe and the United States in the Early Twentieth Century
1020(1)
Early Modernist Tendencies in Europe
1021(11)
Late-Flowering Art Nouveau
1021(2)
The Fauves
1023(2)
Die Brucke
1025(1)
Independent Expressionists
1026(1)
Der Blaue Reiter
1027(4)
Early Modernist Sculpture
1031(1)
Cubism in Europe
1032(10)
Picasso's Early Art
1032(3)
Analytic Cubism
1035(2)
Synthetic Cubism
1037(1)
Responses to Cubism
1038(4)
Early Modernist Tendencies in the United States
1042(1)
Early Modern Architecture
1043(5)
American Modernism
1043(3)
The American Skyscraper
1046(1)
European Modernism
1046(2)
Modernism in Europe Between the Wars
1048(19)
Utilitarian Art Forms in Russia
1049(2)
Rationalism in the Netherlands
1051(2)
Classicism and Purism in France
1053(4)
Bauhaus Art in Germany
1057(3)
Dada
1060(2)
Surrealism
1062(4)
Modernism in Sculpture
1066(1)
Art and Architecture in the United States Between the Wars
1067(11)
Precisionism
1068(1)
American Scene Painting and Photography
1068(4)
The Harlem Renaissance
1072(2)
Abstraction
1074(1)
Architecture
1075(3)
Art in Mexico Between the Wars
1078(1)
Early Modern Art in Canada
1079(4)
The International Avant-Garde Since 1945
1083
The World Since 1945
1084(1)
The ``Mainstream'' Crosses the Atlantic
1085(1)
Postwar European Art
1085(2)
Abstract Expressionism
1087(8)
The Formative Phase
1088(2)
Action Painting
1090(3)
Color Field Painting
1093(1)
Sculpture of the New York School
1094(1)
The Second Generation of Abstract Expressionism
1095(1)
Alternatives to Abstract Expressionism
1095(18)
Return to the Figure
1096(2)
Happenings
1098(1)
Assemblage
1099(2)
Pop Art
1101(4)
Post-Painterly Abstraction and Op Art
1105(1)
Minimalism and Post-Minimalism
1106(2)
Conceptual and Performance Art
1108(2)
Postwar American Photography
1110(1)
The Rise of American Craft Art
1111(2)
From Modernism to Postmodernism
1113(16)
Architecture
1114(7)
Earthworks and Site-Specific Sculpture
1121(2)
Super Realism
1123(1)
Feminist Art
1124(5)
Postmodernism
1129
Neo-Expressionism
1129(3)
Neo-Conceptualism
1132(2)
Later Feminist Art
1134(1)
The Persistence of Modernism
1135(1)
Recent Craft Art
1136(1)
The Return to the Body
1137(1)
Constructed Realities
1138(2)
Public Art
1140(6)
Installation, Video, and Digital Art
1146
Glossary 1(1)
Bibliography 1(1)
Credits 1(1)
Index 1

Excerpts

Students ought to enjoy their first course in art history. Only if they do will they want to experience and appreciate the visual arts--for the rest of their lives--as offering connections to the most tangible creations of the human imagination. To this end, we continue to seek ways to make each edition of Art History a more sensitive, engaging, supportive, and accessible learning resource. The characteristics that elicited such a warm welcome when Art Historywas first published in 1998 remain its hallmarks today in the revised second edition. HALLMARKS OF ART HISTORY Art Historyis contextual in its approach and object-based in its execution.Throughout the text we treat the visual arts, not in isolation, but within the essential contexts of history, geography, politics, religion, and other humanistic studies, and we carefully define the parameters--social, religious, political, and cultural--that either have constrained or have liberated individual artists. A feature called The Object Speaksexplores the role of a work of art within its context by focusing in depth on some of the many things a work of art may have to say. At the same time that we stay grounded in the works of art that make art history distinctive among other humanistic disciplines, we emphasize the significance of the work of art. Art Historyreflects the excitement and pleasures gained by studying art.In writing about art's history, we try to express our affection for the subject. Each chapter opens with a scene-setting vignettethat concentrates on a work of art from that chapter. Set-off text boxes,many illustrated, present interesting, thought-provoking material. A number of them follow the theme of women in the arts--as artists and as patrons. Others give insights into discoveries and controversies. The discipline of art history is many dimensional in its possibilities, and Art Historyinvites a positive sampling of these possibilities. Art Historyis comprehensive.We reach beyond the Western tradition to examine the arts of other regions and cultures, from their beginnings to the twenty-first century. We cover not only the world's most significant paintings and works of sculpture and architecture but also drawings and prints; photographs; works in metal, ceramic, and glass; textiles; jewelry; furniture and aspects of interior design (things that were once considered only utilitarian); such temporal arts as happenings and performance art; and new mediums such as video art, installation art, and digital art. Acknowledging that the majority of survey courses concentrate on the Western tradition, we have organized the chapters on non-Western arts and cultures so that art can be studied from a global perspective within an integrated sequence of Western and non-Western art. just as smoothly, non-Western material can be skipped over without losing the thread of the western narrative. Art Historyoffers a pedagogical advantage.When first published, Art Historywas instantly embraced for its groundbreaking use of drawings and diagrams to aid readers in mastering the terminology of art history. The Elements of Architectureand Technique boxesvisually explain how buildings are constructed and how artists use materials to do everything from creating cave paintings to decorating armor to making photographs. Mapsand timelinesguide the reader visually through the narrative. Every chapter has at least one map and a timeline, and the maps identify every site mentioned in the text. Terms specific to art history are printed in boldface type, which indicates their inclusion in the 900 word Glossary.The Bibliography,compiled for the second edition by distinguished art librarian, Susan Craig, h


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