9780749442842

Brandchild

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780749442842

  • ISBN10:

    0749442840

  • Edition: Revised
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2004-11-01
  • Publisher: Kogan Page Ltd
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Supplemental Materials

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  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
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Summary

Tweens (8- to 14-year-olds) are an increasingly powerful and smart consumer group that spent $300 billion across the globe last year and influenced another $350 billion spend through their parents. Based on the world's most extensive study of tween attitudes and behaviours, and now available in paperback, "Brandchild" is the first book to look in-depth at the phenomena behind global kids and their relationships with brands. Conducted by Millward Brown, the leading global market research agency, the "Brandchild" survey involved several thousand kids from more than 70 cities in 14 countries (throughout Europe, Asia, the United States and South America).

Table of Contents

About the study xvii
About the authors and contributors xix
BRANDchild updated at DualBook.com xxiii
Foreword xxv
Acknowledgements xxvii
1 Tweens
1(24)
Meet the new kids
1(14)
Planet kids
15(8)
Edges
15(1)
Persuaders
16(1)
Followers
16(1)
Reflexives
16(7)
Summary
23(1)
Action points
24(1)
2 Tween dreams for sale
25(20)
Fear
26(3)
Fantasy
29(4)
Goodbye creativity
30(1)
Goodnight Harry
31(2)
Mastery
33(1)
Humour
34(1)
Love
35(2)
Stability
37(2)
The mirror effect
39(1)
Collection value
40(1)
Gaming ability
41(1)
Summary
42(1)
Action points
43(2)
3 Bonded to brands: the transition years
Nigel Hollis
45(26)
CEO's heads explode!
45(3)
Complex
45(1)
Dynamic
46(1)
Cluttered
46(1)
Why it's worth the pain
46(1)
Brand advocates
47(1)
Brand loyalists
47(1)
Forming the bond between tweens and brands
48(2)
Real brand loyalty needs strong foundation
48(1)
Presence
49(1)
Relevance
49(1)
Performance
49(1)
Advantage
49(1)
Bonding
50(1)
The power of brands transcends generations
50(5)
Peer pressure helps undermine tween loyalty
52(2)
The glass is not 40 per cent empty, it's 60 per cent full
54(1)
Tapping into the power of tween advocacy
55(2)
Tapping into future loyalty
57(3)
Exploring tweens' relationships with adult brands
57(1)
Tweens do bond with grown-up brands
58(1)
Presence creates potential
59(1)
Brand attraction matters
60(5)
Avoid the negatives
61(2)
Television is still the focus of attention
63(1)
Why television advertising is still so important
64(1)
Tweens are just like us, only more so
65(1)
Summary
66(1)
Action points
67(11)
Assess current situation
68(1)
Going forward
68(3)
4 Exit fairyland
71(20)
Beliefs versus dreams versus aspirations
71(1)
God inc.
72(3)
The death of belief
75(1)
The new icons
76(2)
Tweens are inspired by tweens, who are inspired by tweens...
78(2)
A challenging community
79(1)
The search for the true tween aspiration
80(2)
Tribes
82(5)
What makes them believe?
83(1)
The dream factory
83(1)
Building trust among a skeptical audience
84(3)
Summary
87(1)
Action points
88(3)
5 Creating imagination
91(20)
Building the sensory experience
92(1)
Licensing is more than just spreading the news
92(1)
You've got Britney
93(1)
The networked brand
94(1)
Brand + Nothing = Fiasco
95(1)
Offline - online
96(1)
Sound + Sight + Smell + Taste + Touch = Brand
97(10)
Sound
98(2)
Sight
100(1)
Real image versus illustration
101(1)
Touch
102(2)
Smell
104(2)
Taste
106(1)
It all adds up
107(1)
Summary
107(1)
Action points
108(3)
6 How do tweens feel about brands?
Patricia B. Seybold
111(10)
Brands vs no brands
111(1)
How passionately do tweens feel about different types of brand experience?
112(5)
'Personal' brands are as important to tweens as 'for profit' brands
116(1)
Relationship with corporate brands
117(2)
Summary
119(2)
7 Stardust
121(16)
Creating icons we admire
122(1)
Music = dreams = brands
122(3)
The look of music
123(2)
Mainstream has become substream
125(1)
The similarity is that there is no similarity
125(1)
Three fundamentals
125(3)
Dreams
125(1)
Romance
126(1)
Rebellion
127(1)
It's getting younger
127(1)
Branding is all about personality
128(2)
Every brand is a human brand
130(1)
Being direct
130(5)
Cause-related brands
131(1)
Cause-related marketing
131(1)
Attitude branding
132(1)
Crossing the 'fine' line...
133(2)
Summary
135(1)
Action points
136(1)
8 The peer factor
137(20)
Using peer-to-peer marketing to build brands
138(17)
Community exploration
139(1)
Peer-to-peer marketing
139(1)
Viral marketing
139(1)
1. Identify a community
139(1)
2. Map the behaviour of the community
141(1)
3. Identify alternative distribution channels
142(1)
4. Identify the leaders of the community
143(1)
5. Build a peer-to-peer marketing programs around the leaders
144(1)
6. Place tweens in the centre - not the brand
146(1)
7. Support the community with unique initiatives
147(1)
8. Develop viral marketing tools enabling the tweens to market for you
151(1)
9. Let the outside world know about the community success
152(2)
10. Spread the brand to audiences outside the community
154(1)
Summary
155(1)
Action points
156(1)
9 Cyberchild
157
Welcome to a new tween reality
157(3)
EverQuest: you are in our world now
158(2)
The day the virtual world became visible on the map
160(1)
Creating a new tween identity
160(3)
The game is to survive - in the real world
161(1)
The intrusion of real dollars
161(1)
Closer and closer to reality
162(1)
Virtual clicks-and-mortar
163(1)
Marketing in many virtual worlds
163(6)
A marketer's dreams?
163(1)
Welcome to the world of virtual branding
164(1)
The true fusion of clicks with bricks
165(1)
The 'dual' personality of tweens
165(2)
Reverse direct marketing
167(1)
Targeting the mercurial personality
167(1)
The tools are there, but they still aren't good enough
168(1)
Eight guidelines for targeting tweens
169(12)
One target group description is never enough
169(1)
Be out there
170(1)
Creative relevance
171(1)
Creating synergy across channels
172(1)
Channel synergy
172(1)
Building virtual brands in virtual worlds
173(2)
Avoiding brand suicide
175(1)
Adapting your language to fit the audience
175(1)
Welcome to TweenSpeak
175(1)
Speeding up the evolution of TweenSpeak
176(1)
Preparing your message for new channels
177(2)
The future is all about branding everything - including language
179(1)
How far did you go?
179(1)
What are the guidelines?
179(1)
What's your brand's language?
180(1)
It all counts
181(1)
Summary
181(1)
Action points
182(3)
10 Personalized brands build strong businesses
Patricia B. Seybold
185(9)
Kids help to design an interactive retail concept
186(1)
What's the Build-a-Bear experience?
186(2)
Built-in upselling and cross-selling
188(1)
Beary viral marketing
188(1)
Beary birthdays
188(1)
Recruiting store associates
189(1)
Keep the honey flowing and the buzz alive
189(1)
Staying attuned to customers
190(1)
Summary
190(3)
11 Santa's nightmare 193(16)
Adding life to brands
194(1)
The death of toys as we knew them
195(1)
Where it all begins
195(11)
Identity seeking
197(1)
Fish streaming
197(3)
Constantly seeking confirmation
200(1)
Quick to adopt, quick to reject
200(1)
Hate to be sold and love to be respected
201(2)
Broader in scope, shallow in detail
203(1)
Been there, done that
203(1)
Community dependency
204(2)
Where does all this leave the tweens...and us?
206(1)
Summary
207(1)
Action points
208(1)
12 The essence of being a child Yun Mi Antorini 209(6)
Targeting children to build a brand
210(3)
Things are about to change
211(1)
Brand power to the people
211(1)
To win children, you've gotta have children
212(1)
Building kids' brands
213(2)
13 Pump up the volume 215(18)
The young and the rich
216(2)
Labelling wishes
217(1)
Where does the money come from?
217(1)
360-degree tween branding
218(10)
A day in the life of a tween
219(1)
Infotainment
219(1)
Edutainment
219(1)
The edutainment excursion
220(1)
Celebrity endorsements
221(1)
Enter the celebrities
221(1)
Meeting the cyber friends
222(1)
Spinning a web with Spider-Man
222(1)
Loyalty concepts
223(1)
Belonging
223(1)
One club, three purposes
224(1)
Advertainment
225(1)
Classic product placement
225(1)
At the movies
226(1)
Bricks-and-mortar advertainment
227(1)
Weekend time
228(1)
The future?
228(2)
Lifetime loyalty
229(1)
Summary
230(1)
Action points
231(2)
14 Superchannels 233(16)
Welcome to the brave new world of media players
234(1)
The next generation of media planning
235(10)
The future is all about brand alliances
236(1)
Back-door branding
237(1)
A 'real' world, 24 hours a day... in fairyland
238(7)
Turn the consumer's problems to your advantage
245(1)
It's now or never
245(1)
Summary
245(1)
Action points
246(3)
15 Kidzbiz 249(32)
Why tweens?
250(29)
Growing big and staying big
252(2)
Categorizing brand trends
254(1)
Olympic brands
255(1)
Classic
256(1)
Specialist
256(1)
Little Tiger
257(1)
Defenders
257(1)
Clean Slate
257(1)
Fading Star
258(1)
Weak
259(1)
The brand trend
259(1)
1. Emotions are driving tweens - and so are brands
260(1)
2. Brand consistency: in search of solid connections
262(1)
3. Product innovation: justifying the brand value to tweens
265(1)
4. Price management: tweens are prepared to pay the price
266(1)
5. Portfolio management: tweens don't buy products, they buy brand solutions
267(1)
6. Channel optimization: at any time, tweens are using any channel
269(1)
7. Perception management: reading the tween mind
271(1)
8. Brand flexibility: no-one can predict what tweens will be like in two years
273(1)
9. Brand interaction: monologue is out, brand dialogue is in
274(3)
10. Leadership: tweens deal only with the leader of the pack
277(1)
The human brand
277(2)
Summary
279(1)
Action points
280(1)
16 Tweens take to hats
Patricia B. Seyhold
281(9)
Where did you get your lid?
281(1)
The Lids customer experience
282(1)
Encouraging repeat buying behaviour
283(1)
Early pioneer of the integrated clicks-and-bricks experience
284(2)
Supporting non-credit card buyers
285(1)
The melon meter: getting a good fit on the Web
285(1)
Make the entire inventory available online
285(1)
Delivering a seamless clicks-and-bricks experience
286(1)
Overzealous retail expansion led to a merger with HatWorld
286(1)
Giving customers the ability to design their own hats
287(1)
Summary
287(2)
17 Calling kids 289(22)
Don't talk down
289(1)
KGOY
290(15)
Watch your brand radar carefully
290(1)
1-800-PROVEIT
291(1)
Irony
291(2)
The invisible brand
293(2)
Find your niche
295(1)
Invent your own sub-channel
295(1)
Reviewing product placement
296(1)
Advertainment
296(2)
Pandora's branded box
298(1)
Back to the future
299(1)
Today's tween hero: the brand!
299(1)
Change the operating hours
300(1)
A transparent brand
301(2)
Privacy
303(1)
Involve them in your plans
303(1)
Show empathy
304(1)
The dramatic shift in marketing planning
305(2)
Interactive marketing planning
305(1)
The brand war room
306(1)
Summary
307(1)
Action points
308(3)
Appendix 1: The BRANDchild research: the world's most extensive study of tween attitudes and brand relationships 311(4)
Appendix 2: Code of ethics 315(2)
Index 317

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