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Building Classroom Discipline

by
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780321076915

ISBN10:
0321076915
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Allyn & Bacon

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Summary

This text analyzes 17 models of school discipline developed by educational thinkers of the last half century and shows how they can be applied in realistic situations. This book assists teachers in creating a structure of positive discipline based on traditional and current disciplinary approaches. The models of discipline presented in this book include six historical approaches that can be studied for perspective and development. Beyond the historical models, eleven current application models reflecting current thought are included with chapter ending cases for each model. The same four cases are repeated to compare outcomes using the suggestions of different models. The final portion of the book presents a guide that helps users build their personal systems of discipline, reflecting the belief that individual teachers will develop individual systems.

Author Biography

C. M. Charles: Emeritus, San Diego State University Gail W. Senter: California State University San Marcos

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Classroom Discipline: The Problem and the Struggle
1(16)
Behavior and Misbehavior
2(1)
Five Types of Misbehavior
3(1)
Discipline and Misbehavior
3(1)
Is Discipline Really Such a Serious Matter?
4(1)
Why Is Misbehavior Becoming Worse?
4(2)
Schools' Efforts to Make Adjustments
6(1)
Improving Discipline in the Classroom
7(3)
Formal Systems of Classroom Discipline
10(1)
Building Your Own System of Discipline
11(1)
References and Recommended Readings
11(6)
Great Pioneers in Modern Discipline
17(16)
Discipline through Influencing Group Behavior
18(2)
Fritz Redl
William Wattenberg
Redl and Wattenberg's Principal Teachings
18(1)
Analysis of Redl and Wattenberg's Contributions
19(1)
Discipline through Shaping Desired Behavior
20(2)
B. F. Skinner
Skinner's Principal Teachings
20(1)
Analysis of Skinner's Contributions
21(1)
Misbehavior as Student Choice
22(1)
William Glasser
Glasser's Principal Teachings
22(1)
Analysis of Glasser's Contributions
23(1)
Improving Discipline through Lesson Management
23(2)
Jacob Kounin
Kounin's Principal Teachings
24(1)
Analysis of Kounin's Contributions
24(1)
Discipline through Congruent Communication
25(3)
Haim Ginott
Ginott's Principal Teachings
26(1)
Analysis of Ginott's Contributions
27(1)
Discipline through Democratic Teaching
28(1)
Rudolf Dreikers
Dreikurs's Principal Teachings
29(1)
Analysis of Dreikurs's Contributions
30(1)
Key Terms Used by the Pioneers in Modern Discipline
31(1)
Questions and Activities
31(1)
References
32(1)
Lee and Marlene Canter's Assertive Discipline
33(18)
Preview of Lee and Marlene Canter's Work
33(1)
About Lee and Marlene Canter
34(1)
The Canters' Contributions to Discipline
34(1)
The Canters' Central Focus
34(1)
The Canters' Principal Teachings
35(1)
Analysis of the Canters' Assertive Discipline
35(11)
Needs and Rights in the Classroom
36(1)
Types of Teachers and Their Effects on Students
36(1)
Moving toward Good Discipline
37(1)
Developing a Solid Basis of Trust and Respect
37(1)
Teaching Students How They Are Expected to Behave in the Classroom
37(1)
Establishing a Discipline Plan That Provides Structure and Identifies Behavior Limits
38(1)
The Discipline Hierarchy
39(1)
Teaching the Plan
40(1)
Providing Positive Recognition
40(1)
Redirecting Nondisruptive Off-Task Behavior
41(1)
Invoking Consequences
41(1)
Working with Difficult Students
42(1)
Reaching Out to Difficult Students
42(1)
Building Trust with Difficult Students
43(1)
Meeting Difficult Students' Needs
43(1)
Providing Positive Support
44(1)
Redirecting Nondisruptive Misbehavior
45(1)
Interacting with Difficult Students
45(1)
Strengths of the Canters' Assertive Discipline
46(1)
Initiating the Canters' Assertive Discipline
47(1)
Review of Selected Terminology
47(1)
Application Exercises
48(1)
Concept Cases
48(1)
Questions and Activities
48(1)
Primary References
49(1)
Recommended Viewing and Reading
49(2)
Fredric Jones's Positive Classroom Discipline
51(16)
Preview of Jones's Work
51(1)
About Fredric Jones
51(1)
Jones's Contributions to Discipline
52(1)
Jones's Central Focus
52(1)
Jones's Principal Teachings
52(1)
Analysis of Jones's Positive Classroom Discipline
53(10)
Misbehavior and Loss of Teaching-Learning Time
53(1)
Skill Clusters in Jones's Model
54(1)
Skill Cluster 1: Classroom Structure to Discourage Misbehavior
55(1)
Skill Cluster 2: Limit-Setting through Body Language
56(1)
Skill Cluster 3: Using Say, See, Do Teaching
57(1)
Skill Cluster 4: Responsibility Training through Incentive Systems
57(5)
Skill Cluster 5: Providing Efficient Help to Individual Students
62(1)
Strengths of Jones's Positive Classroom Discipline
63(1)
Initiating Jones's Positive Classroom Discipline
64(1)
Review of Selected Terminology
64(1)
Application Exercises
65(1)
Concept Cases
65(1)
Questions and Activities
65(1)
Primary References
66(1)
Recommended Viewing and Guides
66(1)
Linda Albert's Cooperative Discipline
67(18)
Preview of Albert's Work
67(1)
About Linda Albert
67(1)
Albert's Contributions to Discipline
68(1)
Albert's Central Focus
68(1)
Albert's Principal Teachings
69(1)
Analysis of Albert's Cooperative Discipline
69(13)
The Goal of Classroom Discipline
70(1)
Why Students Misbehave
70(2)
Albert's Plethora of Strategies
72(1)
The Three C's of Cooperative Discipline
72(1)
The First C-Capability
72(2)
The Second C-Helping Students Connect
74(1)
The Third C-Helping Students Contribute
75(1)
The Classroom Code of Conduct
76(1)
Teaching the Code of Conduct
76(1)
Enforcing the Code of Conduct
77(1)
Reinforcing the Code of Conduct
78(1)
Involving Students and Parents as Partners
78(1)
Avoiding and Defusing Confrontations
79(1)
Dealing with More Severe Confrontations
80(1)
Implementing Consequences
81(1)
Strengths of Albert's Cooperative Discipline
82(1)
Initiating Albert's Cooperative Discipline
82(1)
Review of Selected Terminology
82(1)
Application Exercises
83(1)
Concept Cases
83(1)
Questions and Activities
83(1)
Primary References
83(1)
Recommended Readings and Viewing
84(1)
Thomas Gordon's Discipline as Self-Control
85(18)
Preview of Gordon's Work
85(1)
About Thomas Gordon
85(1)
Gordon's Contributions to Discipline
86(1)
Gordon's Central Focus
86(1)
Gordon's Principal Teachings
87(2)
Analysis of Gordon's Discipline as Self-Control
89(9)
Authority
89(1)
Rewards and Punishment
89(1)
What Is Misbehavior, and Who Owns the Problem?
90(1)
The Behavior Window
90(8)
Strengths of Gordon's Discipline as Self-Control
98(1)
Initiating Gordon's Discipline as Self-Control
99(1)
Review of Selected Terminology
100(1)
Application Exercises
100(1)
Concept Cases
100(1)
Questions and Activities
101(1)
Primary References
101(1)
Recommended Reading
101(2)
Jane Nelsen, Lynn Lott, and H. Stephen Glenn's Positive Discipline in the Classroom
103(18)
Preview of Nelsen, Lott, and Glenn's Work
103(1)
About Jane Nelsen, Lynn Lott, and H. Stephen Glenn
104(1)
Nelsen, Lott, and Glenn's Contributions to Discipline
104(1)
Nelsen, Lott, and Glenn's Central Focus
104(1)
Nelsen, Lott, and Glenn's Principal Teachings
105(1)
Analysis of Nelsen, Lott, and Glenn's Positive Discipline in the Classroom
105(1)
The Significant Seven
106(10)
The Three Empowering Perceptions
106(1)
Four Essential Skills
106(1)
Developing the Significant Seven
106(2)
The Importance of Caring
108(1)
Barriers to Relationships
108(1)
Eight Building Blocks to Effective Class Meetings
109(3)
Beyond Consequences
112(2)
Standard Format for Class Meetings
114(1)
Remember That the Process Takes Time
114(1)
Respectful Classroom Management
114(2)
Putting It All Together
116(1)
Strengths of Positive Discipline in the Classroom
116(1)
Initiating Positive Discipline in the Classroom
116(1)
Review of Selected Terminology
117(1)
Application Exercises
117(1)
Concept Cases
117(1)
Questions and Activities
118(1)
Primary References
118(1)
Recommended Reading and Viewing
119(2)
William Glasser's Noncoercive Discipline
121(16)
Preview of Glasser's Work
121(1)
About William Glasser
121(1)
Glasser's Contributions to Discipline
122(1)
Glasser's Central Focus
123(1)
Glasser's Principal Teachings
123(2)
Prior to 1985
123(1)
Since 1985
124(1)
Analysis of Glasser's Noncoercive Discipline
125(7)
What School Offers
125(1)
Students' Needs
126(1)
Curriculum and Quality Work
127(1)
Quality Teaching
127(1)
Boss Teachers and Lead Teachers
128(2)
The Relation of Quality Teaching to Discipline
130(1)
When Rules Are Broken
131(1)
Strengths of Glasser's Noncoercive Discipline
132(1)
Initiating Glasser's Noncoercive Discipline
133(1)
Review of Selected Terminology
133(1)
Application Exercises
134(1)
Concept Cases
134(1)
Questions and Activities
134(1)
Primary References
135(1)
Recommended Readings
135(2)
Richard Curwin and Allen Mendler's Discipline with Dignity
137(18)
Preview of Curwin and Mendler's Discipline with Dignity
137(1)
About Richard Curwin and Allen Mendler
138(1)
Curwin and Mendler's Contributions to Discipline
138(1)
Curwin and Mendler's Central Focus
138(1)
Curwin and Mendler's Principal Teachings
139(1)
Analysis of Curwin and Mendler's Discipline with Dignity
139(10)
Why Students Misbehave
139(1)
Dignity
140(1)
Students Who Are Behaviorally At-Risk
140(1)
Why Behaviorally At-Risk Students Are Difficult to Control
141(1)
Helping Students Regain Hope
142(1)
Disciplining Difficult-to-Control Students
142(1)
Consequences
143(1)
Preventing Escalation
144(1)
Motivating Difficult-to-Manage Students
145(1)
Dealing with Aggression, Hostility, and Violence
146(1)
A Four-Phase Plan for Schools and Educators
146(2)
Techniques for Dealing with Violence in the Classroom
148(1)
Suggestions to Help Teachers Retrain Themselves
149(1)
Specific Suggestions for Dealing with Conflict
149(1)
Strengths of Curwin and Mendler's Discipline with Dignity
149(1)
Initiating Curwin and Mendler's Discipline with Dignity
150(1)
Principles You Must Accept
150(1)
Establishing the Social Contract
150(1)
Providing Motivation and Helpfulness
151(1)
Review of Selected Terminology
151(1)
Application Exercises
151(1)
Concept Cases
151(1)
Questions and Activities
152(1)
Primary References
152(1)
Recommended Readings
153(2)
Barbara Coloroso's Inner Discipline
155(16)
Preview of Coloroso's Inner Discipline
155(1)
About Barbara Coloroso
155(1)
Coloroso's Contributions to Discipline
156(1)
Coloroso's Central Focus
156(1)
Coloroso's Principal Teachings
156(2)
Analysis of Coloroso's Inner Discipline
158(8)
Three Types of Schools and Teachers
158(1)
Tenets of Inner Discipline
159(1)
Discipline, Not Punishment
159(1)
Three Types of Misbehavior
159(3)
Effective Classroom Discipline Leads to Inner Discipline
162(1)
Teaching Decision Making
162(1)
The Three Cons
163(1)
Problem Solving
164(1)
Natural Consequences
165(1)
Reasonable Consequences and RSVP
166(1)
Strengths of Coloroso's Inner Discipline
166(1)
Initiating Coloroso's Inner Discipline
166(2)
Review of Selected Terminology
168(1)
Application Exercises
168(1)
Concept Cases
168(1)
Questions and Activities
169(1)
Primary References
170(1)
Patricia Kyle, Spencer Kagan, and Sally Scott's Win-Win Discipline
171(18)
Preview of Kyle, Kagan, and Scott's Win-Win Discipline
171(1)
About Patricia Kyle, Spencer Kagan, and Sally Scott
172(1)
Kyle, Kagan, and Scott's Contributions to Discipline
172(1)
Kyle, Kagan, and Scott's Central Focus
173(1)
Kyle, Kagan, and Scott's Principal Teachings
173(1)
Analysis of Kyle, Kagan, and Scott's Win-Win Discipline
174(10)
Applying the Win-Win Discipline Process
175(1)
Identifying the Type of Disruptive Behavior-ABCD
176(1)
Identifying the Student's Position
177(1)
Discipline Structures for the Moment, Follow-Up, and Long-Term
178(2)
Matching Discipline Structures to Student Positions
180(2)
The Role of Logical Consequences
182(1)
Identifying and Dealing with Whole Class Patterns
182(1)
The Big Three
183(1)
Parent and Community Alliances and Schoolwide Programs
183(1)
Strengths of Kyle, Kagan, and Scott's Win-Win Discipline
184(1)
Initiating Kyle, Kagan, and Scott's Win-Win Discipline
184(1)
Review of Selected Terminology
185(1)
Application Exercises
186(1)
Concept Cases
186(1)
Questions and Activities
187(1)
Primary Reference
187(1)
Suggested Readings
187(2)
Alfie Kohn's Beyond Discipline
189(16)
Preview of Kohn's Work
189(1)
About Alfie Kohn
190(1)
Kohn's Central Focus
190(1)
Kohn's Contributions to Discipline
190(1)
Kohn's Principal Teachings
191(1)
Analysis of Kohn's Beyond Discipline
192(9)
The Trouble with Today's Teaching
192(1)
How Instruction Should Be Done
193(1)
Where Discipline Fits in Kohn's Views on Teaching
194(1)
The Trouble with Compliance
195(1)
The Changes That Are Needed
196(1)
The Value of Conflict
197(1)
Regarding Structure and Limits
198(1)
Class Meetings
198(1)
Making Decisions
199(1)
School as a Community
200(1)
Strengths of Kohn's Views
201(1)
Implementing Kohn's Beyond Discipline
201(2)
Review of Selected Terminology
203(1)
Application Exercises
203(1)
Concept Cases
203(1)
Questions and Activities
204(1)
Primary References
204(1)
Recommended Reading
204(1)
C. M. Charles's Synergetic Discipline
205(16)
Preview of Charles's Synergetic Discipline
205(1)
About C. M. Charles
206(1)
Charles's Contributions to Discipline
206(1)
Charles's Central Focus
206(1)
Charles's Principal Teachings
207(1)
Analysis of Charles's Synergetic Discipline
208(6)
Elements of the Synergetic Approach
208(4)
Discipline in the Synergetic Classroom
212(2)
Strengths of Charles's Synergetic Discipline
214(1)
Initiating Charles's Synergetic Discipline
215(2)
Review of Selected Terminology
217(1)
Application Exercises
218(1)
Concept Cases
218(1)
Questions and Activities
219(1)
Primary Reference
219(1)
Recommended Readings
219(2)
Clarifying Your Philosophy and Theory of Discipline
221(14)
Philosophy of Discipline
222(2)
Theory of Discipline
224(4)
The Practice of Discipline
228(6)
Review of Selected Terminology
234(1)
Finalizing a Personal System of Discipline
235(18)
What You and Other Teachers Want
235(1)
Your Plan of Action
236(1)
Preventive Discipline
236(1)
Supportive Discipline
236(1)
Corrective Discipline
237(1)
Sample Discipline Plans
237(7)
A Plan That Emphasizes Rules and Consequences
238(1)
Deborah Sund's Third-Grade Discipline Program
238(3)
A Plan That Emphasizes Prevention and Human Relationships
241(1)
Gail Charles's Discipline Plan-Eighth Grade English
242(2)
Schoolwide Discipline Plans
244(6)
Recommended Components of a Schoolwide System
244(1)
Two Examples of Schoolwide Systems of Discipline
245(5)
Implementing Your Personal System
250(3)
The First Days
250(1)
Keeping Your System Flexible
251(2)
APPENDIX A Classroom Scenarios for Analysis and Practice 253(12)
Scenario 1: Fifth Grade
253(1)
Scenario 2: High School Biology
254(1)
Scenario 3: Middle School Library
255(1)
Scenario 4: Second Grade
256(1)
Scenario 5: High School Special Education
257(1)
Scenario 6: Continuation High School Photography Lab
258(1)
Scenario 7: Sheltered English Kindergarten
259(1)
Scenario 8: Junior High World History
260(1)
Scenario 9: High School American Literature
261(1)
Scenario 10: Sixth Grade, Student Teacher
262(3)
APPENDIX B Synopses of Models of Discipline Analyzed in This Book 265(6)
Assertive Discipline (The Canters)
265(1)
Behavior as Student Choice
265(1)
William Glasser
Beyond Discipline to Community
265(1)
Alfie Kohn
Congruent Communication
266(1)
Haim Ginott
Cooperative Discipline
266(1)
Linda Albert
Dealing with the Group
266(1)
Fritz Redl
William Wattenberg
Democratic Discipline
267(1)
Rudolf Dreikurs
Discipline as Self-Control
267(1)
Thomas Gordon
Discipline with Dignity
267(1)
Richard Curwin
Allen Mendler
Inner Discipline
267(1)
Barbara Coloroso
Managing Lessons and the Class
268(1)
Jacob Kounin
Noncoercive Discipline
268(1)
William Glasser
Positive Classroom Discipline
268(1)
Fredric Jones
Positive Discipline in the Classroom
269(1)
Jane Nelsen
Lynn Lott
H. Stephen Glenn
Shaping Desired Behavior
269(1)
B. F. Skinner
Synergetic Discipline
269(1)
C. M. Charles
Win-Win Discipline
270(1)
Patricia Kyle
Spencer Kagan
Sally Scott
APPENDIX C Authorities in Discipline Included in This Book 271(4)
Albert, Linda
271(1)
Canter, Lee, and Marlene Canter
271(1)
Charles, C. M.
271(1)
Coloroso, Barbara
272(1)
Curwin, Richard, and Allen Mendler
272(1)
Dreikurs, Rudolf (1897-1972)
272(1)
Ginott, Haim (1922-1973)
272(1)
Glasser, William
272(1)
Gordon, Thomas
273(1)
Jones, Fredric
273(1)
Kohn, Alfie
273(1)
Kounin, Jacob
273(1)
Kyle, Patricia, Spencer Kagan, and Sally Scott
273(1)
Nelsen, Jane, Lynn Lott, and H. Stephen Glenn
274(1)
Neo-Skinnerians
274(1)
Redl, Fritz, and William Wattenberg
274(1)
APPENDIX D Major Themes in Discipline, Arranged Alphabetically 275(4)
APPENDIX E Glossary of Terms Related to Discipline 279(10)
Bibliography 289(8)
Index 297


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