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C# How to Program

by ; ; ; ; ;
Edition:
CD
ISBN13:

9780130622211

ISBN10:
0130622214
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2002
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

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Summary

For courses on C# programming found in departments of Computer Science, CIS, MIS, IT, Business, Engineering and Continuing Education. An exciting addition to the How to Program series, C# How to Program provides a comprehensive introduction to Microsoft's new object-oriented language. C# builds on the skills already mastered by countless C++ and Java programmers, enabling them to create powerful Web applications and components-ranging from XML-based Web services on Microsoft's .NET platform to middle-tier business objects and system-level applications. C# How to Program gives students the strong foundation in introductory and intermediate programming principles they'll need in industry. Mastering C# will allow them to create complex systems-using fewer lines of code and reducing the chance for error. The end result is faster development at a decreased cost-and optimum adaptability that makes it easy to keep up with the evolving Web.

Table of Contents

Contents vii
Illustrations
xix
Preface xxxviii
Introduction to Computers, the Internet, the Web and C#
1(32)
Introduction
2(1)
What Is a Computer?
3(1)
Computer Organization
3(1)
Evolution of Operating Systems
4(1)
Personal Computing, Distributed Computing and Client/Server Computing
5(1)
Machine Languages, Assembly Languages and High-level Languages
6(1)
C, C++, Visual Basic. NET and Java™
7(2)
C#
9(1)
Other High-Level Languages
10(1)
Structured Programming
10(1)
Key Software Trend: Object Technology
11(2)
Hardware Trends
13(1)
History of the Internet and World Wide Web
13(2)
World Wide Web Consortium (W3C)
15(1)
Extensible Markup Language (XML)
15(1)
Introduction to Microsoft .NET
16(2)
.NET Framework and the Common Language Runtime
18(2)
Tour of the Book
20(9)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
29(4)
Introduction to the Visual Studio .NET IDE
33(26)
Introduction
34(1)
Visual Studio .NET Integrated Development Environment (IDE) Overview
34(3)
Menu Bar and Toolbar
37(2)
Visual Studio .NET Windows
39(3)
Solution Explorer
39(1)
Toolbox
40(2)
Properties Window
42(1)
Using Help
42(2)
Simple Program: Displaying Text and an Image
44(15)
Introduction to C# Programming
59(35)
Introduction
60(1)
Simple Program: Printing a Line of Text
60(11)
Another Simple Program: Adding Integers
71(4)
Memory Concepts
75(1)
Arithmetic
76(4)
Decision Making: Equality and Relational Operators
80(14)
Control Structures: Part 1
94(45)
Introduction
95(1)
Algorithms
95(1)
Pseudocode
96(1)
Control Structures
96(3)
if Selection Structure
99(1)
if/else Selection Structure
100(5)
while Repetition Structure
105(1)
Formulating Algorithms: Case Study 1 (Counter-Controlled Repetition)
106(3)
Formulating Algorithms with Top-Down, Stepwise Refinement: Case Study 2 (Sentinel-Controlled Repetition)
109(7)
Formulating Algorithms with Top-Down, Stepwise Refinement: Case Study 3 (Nested Control Structures)
116(4)
Assignment Operators
120(1)
Increment and Decrement Operators
121(3)
Introduction to Windows Application Programming
124(15)
Control Structures: Part 2
139(39)
Introduction
140(1)
Essentials of Counter-Controlled Repetition
140(2)
for Repetition Structure
142(4)
Examples Using the for Structure
146(6)
switch Multiple-Selection Structure
152(4)
do/while Repetition Structure
156(2)
Statements break and continue
158(2)
Logical and Conditional Operators
160(6)
Structured-Programming Summary
166(12)
Methods
178(58)
Introduction
179(1)
Program Modules in C#
179(2)
Math Class Methods
181(1)
Methods
181(2)
Method Definitions
183(10)
Argument Promotion
193(2)
C# Namespaces
195(1)
Value Types and Reference Types
196(1)
Passing Arguments: Pass-by-Value vs. Pass-by-Reference
197(3)
Random-Number Generation
200(7)
Example: Game of Chance
207(5)
Duration of Variables
212(1)
Scope Rules
212(3)
Recursion
215(4)
Example Using Recursion: The Fibonacci Series
219(3)
Recursion vs. Iteration
222(1)
Method Overloading
223(13)
Arrays
236(44)
Introduction
237(1)
Arrays
237(2)
Declaring and Allocating Arrays
239(1)
Examples Using Arrays
240(10)
Allocating an Array and Initializing Its Elements
240(2)
Totaling the Elements of an Array
242(1)
Using Histograms to Display Array Data Graphically
243(1)
Using the Elements of an Array as Counters
244(3)
Using Arrays to Analyze Survey Results
247(3)
Passing Arrays to Methods
250(3)
Passing Arrays by Value and by Reference
253(4)
Sorting Arrays
257(3)
Searching Arrays: Linear Search and Binary Search
260(5)
Searching an Array with Linear Search
260(1)
Searching a Sorted Array with Binary Search
261(4)
Multiple-Subscripted Arrays
265(7)
foreach Repetition Structure
272(8)
Object-Based Programming
280(62)
Introduction
281(1)
Implementing a Time Abstract Data Type with a Class
282(8)
Class Scope
290(1)
Controlling Access to Members
290(2)
Initializing Class Objects: Constructors
292(1)
Using Overloaded Constructors
293(4)
Properties
297(9)
Composition: Objects References as Instance Variables of Other Classes
306(3)
Using the this Reference
309(2)
Garbage Collection
311(1)
static Class Members
312(5)
const and readonly Members
317(2)
Indexers
319(7)
Data Abstraction and Information Hiding
326(1)
Software Reusability
327(1)
Namespaces and Assemblies
328(5)
Class View and Object Browser
333(9)
Object-Oriented Programming: Inheritance
342(40)
Introduction
343(1)
Base Classes and Derived Classes
344(3)
protected and internal Members
347(1)
Relationship between Base Classes and Derived Classes
347(21)
Case Study: Three-Level Inheritance Hierarchy
368(3)
Constructors and Destructors in Derived Classes
371(6)
Software Engineering with Inheritance
377(5)
Object-Oriented Programming: Polymorphism
382(56)
Introduction
383(1)
Derived-Class-Object to Base-Class-Object Conversion
383(7)
Type Fields and switch Statements
390(1)
Polymorphism Examples
391(1)
Abstract Classes and Methods
392(2)
Case Study: Inheriting Interface and Implementation
394(8)
sealed Classes and Methods
402(1)
Case Study: Payroll System Using Polymorphism
403(10)
Case Study: Creating and Using Interfaces
413(12)
Delegates
425(5)
Operator Overloading
430(8)
Exception Handling
438(36)
Introduction
439(1)
Exception Handling Overview
440(3)
Example: DivideByZeroException
443(5)
.NET Exception Hierarchy
448(1)
finally Block
449(8)
Exception Properties
457(5)
Programmer-Defined Exception Classes
462(4)
Handling Overflows with Operators checked and unchecked
466(8)
Graphical User Interface Concepts: Part 1
474(46)
Introduction
475(1)
Windows Forms
476(3)
Event-Handling Model
479(5)
Basic Event Handling
480(4)
Control Properties and Layout
484(4)
Labels, TextBoxes and Buttons
488(7)
GroupBoxes and Panels
495(3)
CheckBoxes and RadioButtons
498(9)
PictureBoxes
507(2)
Mouse Event Handling
509(2)
Keyboard Event Handling
511(9)
Graphical User Interface Concepts: Part 2
520(70)
Introduction
521(1)
Menus
521(9)
LinkLabels
530(4)
ListBoxes and CheckedListBoxes
534(8)
ListBoxes
537(2)
CheckedListBoxes
539(3)
ComboBoxes
542(5)
TreeViews
547(6)
ListViews
553(7)
Tab Control
560(5)
Multiple-Document-Interface (MDI) Windows
565(9)
Visual Inheritance
574(4)
User-Defined Controls
578(12)
Multithreading
590(42)
Introduction
591(1)
Thread States: Life Cycle of a Thread
592(2)
Thread Priorities and Thread Scheduling
594(5)
Thread Synchronization and Class Monitor
599(2)
Producer/Consumer Relationship without Thread Synchronization
601(6)
Producer/Consumer Relationship with Thread Synchronization
607(9)
Producer/Consumer Relationship: Circular Buffer
616(16)
Strings, Characters and Regular Expressions
632(52)
Introduction
633(1)
Fundamentals of Characters and Strings
633(2)
String Constructors
635(1)
String Indexer, Length Property and CopyTo Method
636(2)
Comparing Strings
638(4)
String Method GetHashCode
642(1)
Locating Characters and Substrings in Strings
643(3)
Extracting Substrings from Strings
646(1)
Concatenating Strings
647(1)
Miscellaneous String Methods
648(2)
Class StringBuilder
650(2)
StringBuilder Indexer, Length and Capacity Properties, and EnsureCapacity Method
652(2)
StringBuilder Append and AppendFormat Methods
654(4)
StringBuilder Insert, Remove and Replace Methods
658(3)
Char Methods
661(3)
Card Shuffling and Dealing Simulation
664(4)
Regular Expressions and Class Regex
668(16)
Graphics and Multimedia
684(72)
Introduction
685(2)
Graphics Contexts and Graphics Objects
687(1)
Color Control
688(8)
Font Control
696(5)
Drawing Lines, Rectangles and Ovals
701(3)
Drawing Arcs
704(3)
Drawing Polygons and Polylines
707(4)
Advanced Graphics Capabilities
711(6)
Introduction to Multimedia
717(1)
Loading, Displaying and Scalling Images
718(2)
Animating a Series of Images
720(13)
Windows Media Player
733(3)
Microsoft Agent
736(20)
Files and Streams
756(82)
Introduction
757(1)
Data Hierarchy
757(2)
Files and Streams
759(2)
Classes File and Directory
761(10)
Creating a Sequential-Access File
771(12)
Reading Data from a Sequential-Access File
783(11)
Random-Access Files
794(4)
Creating a Random-Access File
798(4)
Writing Data Randomly to a Random-Access File
802(5)
Reading Data Sequentially from a Random-Access File
807(5)
Case Study: A Transaction-Processing Program
812(26)
Extensible Markup Language (XML)
838(57)
Introduction
839(1)
XML Documents
839(5)
XML Namespaces
844(3)
Document Object Model (DOM)
847(18)
Document Type Definitions (DTDs), Schemas and Validation
865(12)
Document Type Definitions
866(3)
Microsoft XML Schemas
869(3)
W3C XML Schema
872(1)
Schema Validation in C#
873(4)
Extensible Stylesheet Language and XslTransform
877(7)
Microsoft BizTalk™
884(3)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
887(8)
Database, SQL and ADO .NET
895(53)
Introduction
896(1)
Relational Database Model
897(1)
Relational Database Overview: Books Database
898(7)
Structured Query Language (SQL)
905(15)
Basic SELECT Query
905(1)
WHERE Clause
906(3)
ORDER By Clause
909(3)
Merging Data from Multiple Tables: INNER JOIN
912(2)
Joining Data from Tables Authors, AuthorISBN, Titles and Publishers
914(3)
INSERT Statement
917(1)
UPDATE Statement
918(1)
DELETE Statement
919(1)
ADO .NET Object Model
920(1)
Programming with ADO .NET: Extracting Information from a DBMS
921(9)
Connecting to and Querying an Access Data Source
921(7)
Querying the Books Database
928(2)
Programming with ADO .NET: Modifying a DBMS
930(8)
Reading and Writing XML Files
938(10)
ASP .NET, Web Forms and Web Controls
948(91)
Introduction
949(1)
Simple HTTP Transaction
950(2)
System Architecture
952(1)
Creating and Running a Simple Web Form Example
953(13)
Web Controls
966(21)
Text and Graphics Controls
967(4)
AdRotator Control
971(5)
Validation Controls
976(11)
Session Tracking
987(19)
Cookies
988(9)
Session Tracking with HttpSessionState
997(9)
Case Study: Online Guest Book
1006(7)
Case Study: Connecting to a Database in ASP .NET
1013(14)
Tracing
1027(3)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1030(9)
ASP .NET and Web Services
1039(67)
Introduction
1040(1)
Web Services
1041(3)
Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) and Web Services
1044(2)
Publishing and Consuming Web Services
1046(16)
Session Tracking in Web Services
1062(13)
Using Web Forms and Web Services
1075(6)
Case Study: Temperature Information Application
1081(10)
User-Defined Types in Web Services
1091(15)
Networking: Streams-Based Sockets and Datagrams
1106(39)
Introduction
1107(1)
Establishing a Simple Server (Using Stream Sockets)
1108(2)
Establishing a Simple Client (Using Stream Sockets)
1110(1)
Client/Server Interaction with Stream-Socket Connections
1111(9)
Connectionless Client/Server Interaction with Datagrams
1120(5)
Client/Server Tic-Tac-Toe Using a Multithreaded Server
1125(20)
Data Structures and Collections
1145(67)
Introduction
1146(1)
Self-Referential Classes
1146(2)
Linked Lists
1148(12)
Stacks
1160(5)
Queues
1165(3)
Trees
1168(17)
Binary Search Tree of Integer Values
1170(7)
Binary Search Tree of IComparable Objects
1177(8)
Collection Classes
1185(27)
Class Array
1185(3)
Class ArrayList
1188(6)
Class Stack
1194(4)
Class Hashtable
1198(14)
Accessibility
1212(61)
Introduction
1213(1)
Regulations and Resources
1214(2)
Web Accessibility Initiative
1216(1)
Providing Alternatives for Images
1216(2)
Maximizing Readability by Focusing on Structure
1218(1)
Accessibility in Visual Studio .NET
1218(6)
Enlarging Toolbar Icons
1219(1)
Enlarging the Text
1220(1)
Modifying the Toolbox
1221(1)
Modifying the Keyboard
1221(1)
Rearranging Windows
1222(2)
Accessibility in C#
1224(6)
Accessibility in XHTML Tables
1230(4)
Accessibility in XHTML Frames
1234(1)
Accessibility in XML
1235(1)
Using Voice Synthesis and Recognition with VoiceXML™
1235(8)
CallXML™
1243(5)
JAWS® for Windows
1248(1)
Other Accessibility Tools
1249(2)
Accessibility in Microsoft® Windows® 2000
1251(13)
Tools for People with Visual Impairments
1252(2)
Tools for People with Hearing Impairments
1254(1)
Tools for Users Who Have Difficulty Using the Keyboard
1255(3)
Microsoft Narrator
1258(3)
Microsoft On-Screen Keyboard
1261(1)
Accessibility Features in Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.5
1262(2)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1264(9)
A Operator Precedence Chart 1273(2)
B Number Systems (on CD) 1275(14)
Introduction
1276(3)
Abbreviating Binary Numbers as Octal Numbers and Hexadecimal Numbers
1279(2)
Converting Octal Numbers and Hexadecimal Numbers to Binary Numbers
1281(1)
Converting from Binary, Octal or Hexadecimal to Decimal
1281(1)
Converting from Decimal to Binary, Octal or Hexadecimal
1282(1)
Negative Binary Numbers: Two's Complement Notation
1283(6)
C Career Opportunities (on CD) 1289(22)
Introduction
1290(1)
Resources for the Job Seeker
1291(1)
Online Opportunities for Employers
1292(5)
Recruiting Services
1297(1)
Career Sites
1298(5)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1303(8)
D Visual Studio .NET Debugger 1311(18)
Introduction
1312(1)
Breakpoints
1313(2)
Examining Data
1315(3)
Program Control
1318(4)
Additional Method Debugging Capabilities
1322(2)
Additional Class Debugging Capabilities
1324(5)
E Generating Documentation in Visual Studio (on CD) 1329(19)
Introduction
1330(1)
Documentation Comments
1330(1)
Documenting C# Source Code
1331(8)
Creating Comment Web Pages
1339(2)
Creating XML Documentation Files
1341(7)
F ASCII Character Set 1348(1)
G Unicode® (on CD) 1349(13)
Introduction
1350(1)
Unicode Transformation Formats
1351(1)
Characters and Glyphs
1352(1)
Advantages and Disadvantages of Unicode
1353(1)
Unicode Consortium's Web Site
1353(2)
Using Unicode
1355(2)
Character Ranges
1357(5)
H COM Integration (on CD) 1362(12)
Introduction
1362(2)
Active X Integration
1364(3)
DLL Integration
1367(4)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1371(3)
I Introduction to HyperText Markup Language 4: Part 1 (on CD) 1374(23)
Introduction
1375(1)
Markup Languages
1375(1)
Editing HTML
1376(1)
Common Elements
1376(3)
Headers
1379(1)
Linking
1380(2)
Images
1382(4)
Special Characters and More Line Breaks
1386(2)
Unordered Lists
1388(1)
Nested and Ordered Lists
1389(3)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1392(5)
J Introduction to HyperText Markup Language 4: Part 2 (on CD) 1397(33)
Introduction
1398(1)
Basic HTML Tables
1398(2)
Intermediate HTML Tables and Formatting
1400(3)
Basic HTML Forms
1403(3)
More Complex HTML Forms
1406(7)
Internal Linking
1413(3)
Creating and Using Image Maps
1416(2)
<meta> Tags
1418(2)
frameset Element
1420(2)
Nested framesets
1422(2)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1424(6)
K Introduction to XHTML: Part 1 (on CD) 1430(26)
Introduction
1431(1)
Editing XHTML
1431(1)
First XHTML Example
1432(3)
W3C XHTML Validation Service
1435(1)
Headers
1436(2)
Linking
1438(3)
Images
1441(4)
Special Characters and More Line Breaks
1445(2)
Unordered Lists
1447(1)
Nested and Ordered Lists
1448(3)
Internet and World Wide Web Resources
1451(5)
L Introduction to XHTML: Part 2 (on CD) 1456(35)
Introduction
1457(1)
Basic XHTML Tables
1457(3)
Intermediate XHTML Tables and Formatting
1460(2)
Basic XTML Forms
1462(3)
More Complex XHTML Forms
1465(8)
Internal Linking
1473(3)
Creating and Using Image Maps
1476(2)
meta Elements
1478(1)
frameset Element
1479(4)
Nested framesets
1483(8)
Internet and World Wide W
M HTML/XHTML Special Characters 1491(1)
N HTML/XHTML Colors 1492(3)
O Bit Manipulation (on CD) 1495(18)
Introduction
1496(1)
Bit Manipulation and the Bitwise Operators
1496(12)
Class BitArray
1508(5)
P Crystal Reports® for Visual Studio .NET 1513(5)
Introduction
1513(1)
Crystal Reports Web Site Resources
1513(1)
Crystal Reports and Visual Studio .NET
1514(4)
Bibliography 1518(4)
Index 1522

Excerpts

Live in fragments no longer. Only connect. Edward Morgan Forster We wove a web in childhood, A web of sunny air. Charlotte Bronte Welcome to C# and the world of Windows, Internet and World-Wide-Web programming with Visual Studio and the .NET platform! This book is the second in our new.NET How to Programseries, which presents various leading-edge computing technologies in the context of the .NET platform. C# is the next phase in the evolution of C and C++ and was developed expressly for Microsoft's .NET platform. C# provides the features that are most important to programmers, such as object-oriented programming, strings, graphics, graphical-user-interface (GUI) components, exception handling, multithreading, multimedia (audio, images, animation and video), file processing, prepackaged data structures, database processing, Internet and World-Wide-Web-based client/server networking and distributed computing. The language is appropriate for implementing Internet- and World-Wide-Web-based applications that seamlessly integrate with PC-based applications. The .NET platform offers powerful capabilities for software development and deployment, including independence from a specific language or platform. Rather than requiring developers to learn a new programming language, programmers can contribute to the same software project, but write code using any (or several) of the .NET languages (such as Visual Basic .NET, Visual C++ .NET, C# and others) with which they are most competent. In addition to providing language independence, .NET extends program portability by enabling .NET applications to reside on, and communicate across, multiple platforms--thus facilitating the delivery of Web services over the Internet. .NET enables Web-based applications to be distributed to consumer-electronic devices, such as cell phones and personal digital assistants, as well as to desktop computers. The capabilities that Microsoft has incorporated into the .NET platform create a new software-development paradigm that will increase programmer productivity and decrease development time. New Features inC# How to Program This edition contains many new features and enhancements, including: Two-Color Presentation.This book is in two color. Two color enables readers to see sample outputs similar to how they would appear on a color monitor. Also, we syntax color the C# code similar to the way Visual Studio .NET colors the code in its editor window. Our syntax-coloring conventions are as follows: - comments - keywords - literal values - text, class, method and variable names "Code Washing."This is our term for the process we use to format the programs in the book so that they have a carefully commented, open layout. The code appears in full color and grouped into small, well-documented pieces. This greatly improves code readability--an especially important goal for us, considering that this book contains approximately 23,500 lines of code. Web Services and ASP.NET.Microsoft's .NET strategy embraces the Internet and Web as integral to the software development and deployment processes. Web services--a key technology in this strategy--enables information sharing, commerce and other interactions using standard Internet protocols and technologies, such as Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP) and Extensible Markup Language (XML). Web services enable programmers to package application functionality in a form that turns the Web into a library of reusable software components. In Chapter 21, ASP .NET and Web Services, we present a Web service that allows users to make airline seat reservations. In this example, a user accesses a Web page, chooses a seating option and submits the page to the Web server. The page then calls a Web service tha


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