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Composing a Civic Life : A Rhetoric and Readings for Inquiry and Action,9780321413598

Composing a Civic Life : A Rhetoric and Readings for Inquiry and Action

by ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780321413598

ISBN10:
0321413598
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/30/2006
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $93.60

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Summary

Composing A Civic Lifepromotes informed, active citizenship by encouraging the reader to write as a means of inquiry and civic participation. This text aims to help the reader to be better citizens of all their communities, not just in their knowledge, but in their ability to think critically, write effectively, and live wisely. Citizenship, argumentation, research and community action General Interest; Civic Writing

Table of Contents

Preface xxi
What Does It Mean to Be a Citizen?
1(45)
Getting Started: Picturing Citizenship
1(1)
First Inquiry: Using Mind Maps to Assess What You Know About Citizenship
1(2)
Exercise 1.1 Creating Your Own Mind Map
2(1)
Second Inquiry: Dictionary Definitions
3(5)
Exercise 1.2 Comparing Dictionary Definitions
4(3)
Stop And Think Time to Bring in the College Community?
7(1)
Third Inquiry: Official Documents
8(12)
U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Naturalization Requirements
8(5)
The U.S. Constitution
13(7)
Fourth Inquiry: Visual Messages
20(4)
Fifth Inquiry: Narratives of Citizenship
24(17)
Eva Paus ``Reflections of a New U.S. Citizen''
25(2)
Benjamin Franklin from Autobiography
27(9)
Writing Style Crafting a Persona
36(1)
Ralph Ellison Prologue from Invisible Man
36(5)
Writing Style Writing as a Performance Art
41(1)
Writing Your Own Narrative of Citizenship
41(1)
Assessing the Progress of Our Inquiries
42(2)
Projects For Inquiry And Action
44(2)
Critical Literacy: The Skills to Live an Examined Life
46(39)
Getting Started: Critical Thinking As Examining Life
46(3)
First Inquiry: Critical Reading as Active Conversation
49(7)
The Declaration Of Independence
51(5)
Second Inquiry: Using a Writer's Notebook to Connect Thinking, Reading, and Writing
56(4)
Third Inquiry: Developing Your Writing Process
60(22)
Conceiving: The Early Stage of Writing
64(1)
Planning: Exploring Your Writing Situation
64(1)
Prewriting: Generating Ideas
65(3)
Drafting
68(5)
Clarifying: The Middle Stage of Writing
73(2)
Re-seeing: Rethinking Your Premises
75(1)
Reviewing: Getting Feedback from Readers
76(2)
Revising: Reshaping Your Work
78(2)
Crafting: The Later Stage of Writing
80(1)
Editing
80(1)
Proofreading
81(1)
Continuing the Inquiry: Critical Literacy and Citizenship
82(2)
Projects For Inquiry And Action
84(1)
Researching: Inquiry as Action
85(34)
Getting Started: Inquiring In Our Communities
85(2)
First Inquiry: Using Critical Reading and Writing as a Catalyst for Inquiry
87(7)
Ursula Le Guin ``The Ones Who Walk Away from Omelas''
89(4)
Exercise 3.1 Writing to Develop an Inquiry
93(1)
Second Inquiry: Developing a Research Plan
94(2)
Exercise 3.2 Developing a Research Plan
96(1)
Third Inquiry: Inquiring Effectively Using Research Methods
96(19)
Becoming Information Literate: Researching in Electronic, Print, and Broadcast Media
97(1)
Researching on the World Wide Web
98(2)
Exercise 3.3 Using the World Wide Web for Research
100(1)
Exercise 3.4 Finding Articles in Databases
101(1)
Researching in the Library
101(2)
Exercise 3.5 Inquiring in Your Library
103(2)
Stop And Think The Ethics of Online Research
105(1)
Researching with Broadcast Media
105(1)
Exercise 3.6 Inquiring in Broadcast Media
106(1)
Getting the Lived Experience: Inquiring Through Field Research
107(1)
Observation
108(1)
Interviewing
109(2)
Stop And Think Larry King on Asking Questions in Interviews
111(1)
Surveys
112(1)
Stop And Think Robert Putnam on Crafting Questions for Surveys
113(1)
Exercise 3.7 Practicing Field Research Techniques
114(1)
Stop And Think Ethics of Field Research
115(1)
Weaving Together Inquiry and Action in Community-based Service Learning
115(2)
Exercise 3.8 Examining Our Motives
117(1)
Conclusion: Inquiry as Argument
117(1)
Projects For Inquiry And Action
118(1)
Arguing: Action as Inquiry
119(37)
Getting Started: Arguing In Our Communities
119(2)
First Inquiry: What Is Arguing to Inquire?
121(11)
Summarizing an Argument
122(1)
Analyzing an Argument
123(1)
Exercise 4.1 Critically Responding to the Declaration of Independence
124(1)
Susan B. Anthony ``Women's Right to Vote''
125(5)
The Black Panthers ``Ten Point Plan''
130(2)
Second Inquiry: Developing an Arguing Mind
132(5)
Exercise 4.2 The Principles of Civil Arguing
133(1)
Stop And Think Deborah Tannen and the Argument Culture
134(1)
Exercise 4.3 Assessing Opportunities to Argue
135(2)
Exercise 4.4 Framing Our Arguments
137(1)
Third Inquiry: Arguing Effectively
137(18)
Exercise 4.5 Discovering Types of Appeals
138(1)
Appealing to Evidence
139(1)
Exercise 4.6 Assessing Appeals to Evidence
140(2)
Appealing to Reason
142(2)
Exercise 4.7 Assessing Appeals to Reason
144(4)
Stop And Think Michael Shermer and Skepticism
148(1)
Appealing to Character
149(1)
Exercise 4.8 Assessing Appeals to Character
149(1)
Appealing to Emotions
150(1)
Exercise 4.9 Assessing Appeals to Emotions
151(2)
Appealing to Visual Arguments
153(1)
Exercise 4.10 Creating Visual Arguments: Adbusters
154(1)
Conclusion: Argument as Inquiry
155(1)
Projects For Inquiry And Action
155(1)
Writing in Communities: Academic Research and Social Action
156(39)
Getting Started: Critical Literacy And Civic Participation
156(2)
First Inquiry: Writing in an Academic Community
158(24)
Re-seeing the Research Paper
158(1)
Exercise 5.1 Comparing Research Papers
159(2)
Forming a Research Question
161(2)
Exercise 5.2 Inquiring and Arguing in Academic Communities
163(1)
Planning the Research Project
164(1)
Research the Writing Situation
164(1)
Set the Scope of Your Research
165(1)
Clarify Your Purpose
165(1)
Define Your Methods
165(1)
Set Your Schedule
166(1)
Exercise 5.3 Writing Up Your Research Plan
167(1)
Understanding the Conversation on Your Subject
167(1)
Exercise 5.4 Telling the Story of Your Research
168(1)
Writing the Research Paper
169(1)
Exercise 5.5 Asking Questions to Revise
170(1)
Citing and Documenting Sources
170(2)
Using Other Writers Words and Ideas
172(1)
Incorporating Sources
172(1)
Bibliographies and Documentation
173(2)
Research Process in Action: One Student's Story
175(1)
Holly Van De Venter ``Educating the New America''
175(7)
Second Inquiry: Writing in Civic Communities
182(12)
Student Participation in Public Debate
184(1)
Exercise 5.6 Noticing Conversations in the Public Sphere
184(3)
The Genres of Public Debate
187(1)
News Articles
188(1)
Editorials and Opinion Pieces
188(1)
Letters to the Editor
189(1)
Letters to Public Officials
190(1)
Pamphlets and Posters
191(1)
The Internet: Web Sites and Blogs
192(1)
The Internet: E-mail, Chat Rooms, and Electronic Mailing Lists
193(1)
Zines
194(1)
Projects For Inquiry And Action
194(1)
The Family as Community
195(79)
Getting Started: How Do We See The Family?
195(45)
Mary Pipher ``Beliefs About Families''
198(4)
Tony Earley ``Somehow Form a Family''
202(8)
Writing Style Showing, Not Telling
210(1)
Gigi Kaeser ``Love Makes a Family'' (photograph)
211(1)
Jeff Riedel ``Inward Christian Soldiers'' (photograph)
212(1)
Margaret Talbot ``A Mighty Fortress''
213(15)
James McBride ``Black Power''
228(7)
Fatima Mernissi ``Moonlit Nights of Laughter''
235(5)
Case Study A More Perfect Union: Defining Family through the Marriage Protection Amendment
240(31)
Marriage Protection Amendment
240(1)
Rick Santorum ``The Meaning of Family''
240(7)
Maggie Gallagher ``What Marriage Is For''
247(5)
Writing Style Creating a Pamphlet
252(2)
Tom Tomorrow ``A Brief History of Marriage in America'' (cartoon)
254(1)
Jonathan Rauch ``What Is Marriage For?''
255(10)
Barrie Jean Borich ``When I Call Her My Husband''
265(4)
George Lakoff ``What's in a Word?''
269(2)
Questions For Inquiry And Action
271(1)
Continuing The Case Study: Should Congress Define The American Family?
272(2)
The Higher Education Community
274(59)
Getting Started: Exploring Your Campus
274(46)
Arthur Levine and Jeanette S. Cureton ``Collegiate Life: An Obituary''
276(8)
Roger H. Garrison ``Why Am I in College?''
284(8)
Mark Edmundson ``On the Uses of a Liberal Education: As Lite Entertainment for Bored College Students''
292(13)
Stop And Think The Consumer Model for Universities
305(1)
Bell Hooks ``Engaged Pedagogy''
306(6)
Peter Sacks ``The Sandbox Experiment''
312(8)
Case Study Free to Teach, Free to Learn: Academic Freedom and the Academic Bill of Rights
320(10)
David Horowitz ``Why an Academic Bill of Rights Is Necessary''
320(5)
``Is Your Professor Using the Classroom as a Political Soapbox?'' (poster)
325(1)
``What Is Academic Freedom? Is It a License for Professors to Engage in Classroom Indoctrination?'' (poster)
326(1)
Stanley Fish ``'Intellectual Diversity': the Trojan Horse of a Dark Design''
326(4)
Questions For Inquiry And Action
330(1)
Continuing The Case Study: How Do Colleges Enforce A Civil Community?
331(2)
Citizens of the World: The Global Community
333(77)
Getting Started: Becoming A Global Citizen
333(33)
Peter Mayer ``Earth Town Square''
336(1)
Pico Iyer ``The Global Village Finally Arrives''
337(4)
James L. Watson ``China's Big Mac Attack''
341(10)
Stop And Think The Olympic Games
351(1)
Ngugi Wa Thiong'o ``Decolonising the Mind''
352(6)
Roz Chast ``One Morning, While Getting Dressed'' (cartoon)
358(2)
Slavenka Drakulic ``On Bad Teeth''
360(6)
Case Study Jihad vs. McWorld: Seeking a Way of Talking About Civilizations in Conflict
366(42)
Benjamin R. Barber ``Jihad vs. McWorld''
366(10)
Letters to the Editor
376(1)
Writing Style Writing Letters to the Editor
377(2)
Samuel P. Huntington from ``The Clash of Civilizations?''
379(12)
David Brooks ``All Cultures Are Not Equal''
391(2)
Writing Style Writing Editorials and Opinion Pieces
393(1)
Barbara Ehrenreich ``Christian Wahhabists''
394(2)
Seyla Benhabib ``Unholy Wars''
396(12)
Questions For Inquiry And Action
408(1)
Continuing The Case Study: Why Are Women At The Center Of The Clash Of Civilizations?
408(2)
Citizens of the Earth: The Planetary Community
410(52)
Getting Started: Taking Your Ecological Footprint
410(26)
Regina Austin And Michael Schill ``Activists of Color''
412(8)
David W. Orr ``Saving Future Generations from Global Warming''
420(3)
Writing Style The Problem/Solution Essay
423(1)
John Haines ``Snow''
424(2)
Bruce Stockler ``Saved by Sequoias''
426(5)
William Wordsworth ``The World is Too Much With Us''
431(1)
Muriel Rukeyser ``St. Roach''
432(1)
John Clare ``The Badger''
433(2)
Stop And Think The Value of Poetry to Civic Dialogues
435(1)
Case Study Caretakers of the Earth: Comparing Visions of Ecological Responsibility
436(23)
Rachel Carson from Silent Spring
436(6)
Stop And Think How Do You See Nature?
442(2)
Richard Louv ``Don't Know Much about Natural History: Education as a Barrier to Nature''
444(8)
Steve Chapple ``Eco-Rednecks''
452(2)
Frances Moore Lappe from Diet for a Small Planet
454(5)
Questions For Inquiry And Action
459(1)
Continuing The Case Study: How Lightly Do You Walk The Earth?
459(3)
Communities of Faith
462(63)
Getting Started: Observing Worship Practices In Faith Communities
462(44)
Anne Lamott ``Why I Make Sam Go To Church''
464(3)
Stop And Think House Churches: Designing Your Own Worship
467(1)
Stephen J. Dubner ``Choosing My Religion''
468(16)
Michael Wolfe ``Islam: the Next American Religion?''
484(3)
Stop And Think What's Your Spiritual Community?
487(2)
Wendy Kaminer ``The Last Taboo: Why America Needs Atheism''
489(8)
Bill Mckibben ``The Christian Paradox: How a Faithful Nation Gets Jesus Wrong''
497(9)
Case Study Living Out the Dream: The Black Church and the Civil Rights Movement
506(13)
Robert M. Franklin ``Another Day's Journey: Faith Communities Renewing American Democracy''
506(8)
Martin Luther King, Jr. ``Speech at Holt Street Baptist Church, Dec. 5, 1955''
514(2)
Bernice Johnson Reagon Interview
516(2)
James Lawson ``Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Statement of Purpose''
518(1)
Questions For Inquiry And Action
519(3)
Writing Style Public Letters
520(2)
Continuing The Case Study: Where Do We Go From Here: How Do Social Change Movements Work?
522(3)
Virtual Communities
525(44)
Getting Started: H. G. Wells And The World Brain
525(26)
Esther Dyson ``Communities''
527(10)
Jeff Dietrich ``Refusing to Hope in a God of Technology''
537(3)
Stop And Think 78 Questions: A Guide to Living with Technology
540(2)
Jake Mulholland And Adrienne Martin ``Tune Out''
542(5)
David Shenk ``Technorealism: An Overview''
547(4)
Case Study A Hitchhiker's Guide to the Blogosphere: Blogs and the Standards of Professional Journalism
551(16)
Lev Grossman ``Meet Joe Blog: Why are more and more people getting their news from amateur websites called blogs? Because they're fast, funny, and totally biased.''
551(4)
Writing Style Writing a News Article
555(1)
``The Blogger Manifesto (Or, Do Weblogs Make the Internet Better or Worse?)''
556(3)
Bonnie A. Nardi, Diane J. Schiano, Michelle Gumbrecht, Luke Swartz ``Why We Blog''
559(8)
Questions For Inquiry And Action
567(1)
Continuing The Case Study: Can Blogs Uphold The Standards Of Good Journalism, And Should They?
568(1)
Credits 569(4)
Index 573


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