CART

(0) items

Consumer Behavior,9780131869608
This item qualifies for
FREE SHIPPING!

FREE SHIPPING OVER $59!

Your order must be $59 or more, you must select US Postal Service Shipping as your shipping preference, and the "Group my items into as few shipments as possible" option when you place your order.

Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace Items, eBooks, Apparel, and DVDs not included.

Consumer Behavior

by ;
Edition:
9th
ISBN13:

9780131869608

ISBN10:
0131869604
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $223.19
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $3.99
See Prices

Rent Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Used Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

eTextbook

We're Sorry
Not Available

New Textbook

We're Sorry
Sold Out

Related Products


  • Consumer Behavior
    Consumer Behavior
  • Consumer Behavior
    Consumer Behavior
  • Consumer Behavior
    Consumer Behavior
  • Consumer Behavior
    Consumer Behavior




Summary

With a strong empirical and market segmentation approach, this book focuses on how the Internet has changed the way people obtain information about potential purchases, giving readers the most up-to-date material on how technology is changing their lives as consumers. The Thirty-two mini-cases help readers learn by applying the theory, drawing on current business news to demonstrate specific consumer behavior concepts. This edition now includes thirty-two Active Learning mini-cases. A clear consumer decision making model is set out in each chapter to facilitate learningpresented in the first chapter, this model serves as a structural framework for the conceptsthe building blocksexamined in the following chapters. The book's final chapter ties all of these concepts together so readers see the interrelationships and relevance of individual concepts to consumer decision-making. For those studying consumer behavior and/or marketing.

Table of Contents

Prefacep. xv
Introductionp. 2
Consumer Behavior: Its Origins and Strategic Applicationsp. 2
Development of the marketing conceptp. 4
The marketing conceptp. 5
Implementing the marketing conceptp. 6
Segmentation, targeting, and positioningp. 6
The marketing mixp. 7
Customer value, satisfaction, and retentionp. 7
Providing customer valuep. 8
Customer satisfactionp. 9
Customer retentionp. 10
The impact of digital technologies on marketing strategiesp. 11
Challenges marketers facep. 13
Marketing ethics and social responsibilityp. 14
Consumer behavior and decision making are interdisciplinaryp. 15
A simplified model of consumer decision makingp. 15
The plan of this bookp. 16
Summaryp. 17
Discussion Questionsp. 18
Exercisesp. 18
Key Termsp. 18
Notesp. 18
Consumer Researchp. 20
Consumer research paradigmsp. 22
Quantitative researchp. 22
Qualitative researchp. 22
Combining qualitative and quantitative research findingsp. 22
The consumer research processp. 23
Developing research objectivesp. 23
Collecting secondary datap. 24
Designing primary researchp. 26
Data analysis and reporting research findingsp. 37
Conducting a research studyp. 37
Ethics in consumer researchp. 38
Summaryp. 39
Discussion Questionsp. 39
Exercisesp. 40
Key Termsp. 40
Notesp. 40
Market Segmentationp. 42
What is market segmentation?p. 44
Who uses market segmentation?p. 44
How market segmentation operatesp. 45
Bases for segmentationp. 45
Geographic segmentationp. 47
Demographic segmentationp. 48
Psychological segmentationp. 53
Psychographic segmentationp. 53
Sociocultural segmentationp. 54
Use-related segmentationp. 57
Usage-situation segmentationp. 60
Benefit segmentationp. 60
Hybrid segmentation approachesp. 62
Criteria for effective targeting of market segmentsp. 75
Identificationp. 76
Sufficiencyp. 76
Stabilityp. 76
Accessibilityp. 76
Implementing segmentation strategiesp. 76
Concentrated versus differentiated marketingp. 76
Countersegmentationp. 77
Summaryp. 77
Discussion Questionsp. 78
Exercisesp. 78
Key Termsp. 78
Notesp. 79
The Consumer as an Individualp. 80
Consumer Motivationp. 80
Motivation as a psychological forcep. 83
Needsp. 83
Goalsp. 84
Positive and negative motivationp. 87
Rational versus emotional motivesp. 88
The dynamics of motivationp. 89
Needs are never fully satisfiedp. 89
New needs emerge as old needs are satisfiedp. 90
Success and failure influence goalsp. 90
Multiplicity of needs and variation of goalsp. 92
Arousal of motivesp. 94
Types and systems of needsp. 97
Hierarchy of needsp. 97
An evaluation of the need hierarchy and marketing applicationsp. 100
A trio of needsp. 102
The measurement of motivesp. 105
Motivational researchp. 106
Evaluation of motivational researchp. 109
Ethics and consumer motivationp. 109
Summaryp. 110
Discussion Questionsp. 111
Exercisesp. 112
Key Termsp. 112
Notesp. 112
Personality and Consumer Behaviorp. 114
What is personality?p. 116
The nature of personalityp. 116
Theories of personalityp. 117
Freudian theoryp. 117
Neo-Freudian personality theoryp. 120
Trait theoryp. 120
Personality and understanding consumer diversityp. 122
Consumer innovativeness and related personality traitsp. 123
Cognitive personality factorsp. 126
From consumer materialism to compulsive consumptionp. 128
Consumer ethnocentrism: responses to foreign-made productsp. 130
Brand personalityp. 133
Brand personificationp. 133
Product personality and genderp. 135
Product personality and geographyp. 135
Personality and colorp. 135
Self and self-imagep. 137
One or multiple selvesp. 138
The extended selfp. 141
Altering the selfp. 141
Virtual personality or selfp. 143
Summaryp. 144
Discussion Questionsp. 144
Exercisesp. 145
Key Termsp. 145
Notesp. 145
Consumer Perceptionp. 150
Elements of perceptionp. 152
Sensationp. 152
The absolute thresholdp. 153
The differential thresholdp. 153
Subliminal perceptionp. 155
Dynamics of perceptionp. 158
Perceptual selectionp. 160
Perceptual organizationp. 163
Perceptual interpretationp. 167
Consumer imageryp. 170
Product positioningp. 170
Product repositioningp. 174
Positioning of servicesp. 174
Perceived pricep. 177
Perceived qualityp. 178
Price/quality relationshipp. 183
Retail store imagep. 185
Manufacturers' imagep. 186
Perceived riskp. 187
Perception of risk variesp. 187
How consumers handle riskp. 188
Ethics and consumer perceptionp. 189
Summaryp. 191
Discussion Questionsp. 192
Exercisesp. 192
Key Termsp. 193
Notesp. 193
Consumer Learningp. 196
The elements of consumer learningp. 198
Motivationp. 199
Cuesp. 199
Responsep. 199
Reinforcementp. 200
Behavioral learning theoriesp. 201
Classical conditioningp. 201
Instrumental conditioningp. 210
Modeling or observational learningp. 215
Cognitive learning theoryp. 215
Information processingp. 216
Involvement theoryp. 220
Measures of consumer learningp. 225
Recognition and recall measuresp. 225
Ethics and consumer learningp. 230
Summaryp. 232
Discussion Questionsp. 233
Exercisesp. 233
Key Termsp. 233
Notesp. 234
Consumer Attitude Formation and Changep. 236
What are attitudes?p. 238
The attitude "object"p. 238
Attitudes are a learned predispositionp. 238
Attitudes have consistencyp. 238
Attitudes occur within a situationp. 239
Structural models of attitudesp. 239
Tricomponent attitude modelp. 241
Multiattribute attitude modelsp. 244
Theory of trying-to-consume modelp. 246
Attitude-toward-the-ad modelsp. 247
Attitude formationp. 249
How attitudes are learnedp. 249
Sources of influence on attitude formationp. 251
Personality factorsp. 252
Strategies of attitude changep. 253
Changing the basic motivational functionp. 253
Associating the product with a special group, event, or causep. 256
Resolving two conflicting attitudesp. 259
Altering components of the multiattribute modelp. 259
Changing beliefs about competitors' brandsp. 263
The elaboration likelihood model (ELM)p. 263
Behavior can precede or follow attitude formationp. 263
Cognitive dissonance theoryp. 264
Attribution theoryp. 264
Summaryp. 268
Discussion Questionsp. 269
Exercisesp. 269
Key Termsp. 270
Notesp. 270
Communication and Consumer Behaviorp. 274
Components of communicationp. 276
The senderp. 277
The receiverp. 278
The mediump. 278
The messagep. 278
Feedbackp. 279
The communications processp. 280
The message initiator (source)p. 281
The target audience (receivers)p. 286
Feedback-the receiver's responsep. 288
Designing persuasive communicationsp. 291
Communications strategyp. 291
Target audiencep. 292
Media strategyp. 292
Message strategiesp. 293
Message structure and presentationp. 295
Marketing communication and ethicsp. 302
Precision targetingp. 302
The contents of promotional messagesp. 303
Summaryp. 305
Discussion Questionsp. 305
Exercisesp. 306
Key Termsp. 306
Notesp. 306
Consumers in Their Social and Cultural Settingsp. 310
Reference Groups and Family Influencesp. 310
What is a group?p. 312
Understanding the power of reference groupsp. 312
A broadened perspective on reference groupsp. 313
Factors that affect reference group influencep. 313
Selected consumer-related reference groupsp. 316
Friendship groupsp. 316
Shopping groupsp. 316
Work groupsp. 317
Virtual groups or communitiesp. 317
Consumer-action groupsp. 319
Celebrity and other reference group appealsp. 321
Celebritiesp. 321
The expertp. 323
The "common man"p. 323
The executive and employee spokespersonp. 325
Trade or spokes-charactersp. 325
Other reference group appealsp. 325
The family is a concept in fluxp. 326
The changing U.S. familyp. 329
Socialization of family membersp. 332
Consumer socialization of childrenp. 333
Adult consumer socializationp. 335
Intergenerational socializationp. 335
Other functions of the familyp. 336
Economic well-beingp. 337
Emotional supportp. 337
Suitable family lifestylesp. 337
Family decision making and consumption-related rolesp. 339
Key family consumption rolesp. 339
Dynamics of husband-wife decision makingp. 340
The expanding role of children in family decision makingp. 340
The family life cyclep. 343
Traditional family life cyclep. 344
Modifications-the nontraditional FLCp. 348
Summaryp. 350
Discussion Questionsp. 351
Exercisesp. 352
Key Termsp. 352
Notesp. 352
Social Class and Consumer Behaviorp. 356
What is social class?p. 358
Social class and social statusp. 358
The dynamics of status consumptionp. 358
Social class is hierarchical and a form of segmentationp. 359
Social-class categoriesp. 360
The measurement of social classp. 361
Subjective measuresp. 361
Reputational measuresp. 363
Objective measuresp. 363
Lifestyle profiles of the social classesp. 370
China: pursuing a middle-class lifestylep. 370
Social-class mobilityp. 370
Some signs of downward mobilityp. 372
Is horatio alger dead?p. 372
Geodemographic clusteringp. 373
The affluent consumerp. 373
The media exposure of the affluent consumerp. 379
Segmenting the affluent marketp. 380
Middle-class consumersp. 381
Moving up to more "near" luxuriesp. 381
The working class and other nonaffluent consumersp. 382
Recognizing the "techno-class"p. 382
The geek gets statusp. 383
Selected consumer behavior applications of social classp. 383
Clothing, fashion, and shoppingp. 383
The pursuit of leisurep. 385
Saving, spending, and creditp. 386
Social class and communicationp. 386
Summaryp. 388
Discussion Questionsp. 389
Exercisesp. 389
Key Termsp. 389
Notesp. 389
The Influence of Culture on Consumer Behaviorp. 392
What is culture?p. 394
The invisible hand of culturep. 394
Culture satisfies needsp. 395
Culture is learnedp. 396
How culture is learnedp. 397
Enculturation and acculturationp. 397
Eanguage and symbolsp. 398
Ritualp. 400
Culture is sharedp. 401
Culture is dynamicp. 402
The measurement of culturep. 403
Content analysisp. 403
Consumer fieldworkp. 403
Value measurement survey instrumentsp. 404
American core valuesp. 406
Achievement and successp. 406
Activityp. 407
Efficiency and practicalityp. 407
Progressp. 409
Material comfortp. 409
Individualismp. 410
Freedomp. 411
External conformityp. 411
Humanitarianismp. 413
Youthfulnessp. 414
Fitness and healthp. 414
Core values are not only an american phenomenonp. 415
Toward a shopping culturep. 416
Summaryp. 417
Discussion Questionsp. 417
Exercisesp. 418
Key Termsp. 418
Notesp. 418
Subcultures and Consumer Behaviorp. 420
What is subculture?p. 422
Nationality subculturesp. 423
Hispanic subculturesp. 423
Religious subculturesp. 427
Geographic and regional subculturesp. 431
Racial subculturesp. 432
The african american consumerp. 432
Asian american consumersp. 435
Age subculturesp. 438
The generation Y marketp. 439
The generation X marketp. 440
The baby boomer marketp. 441
Older consumersp. 443
Sex as a subculturep. 446
Sex roles and consumer behaviorp. 446
Consumer products and sex rolesp. 446
Women as depicted in media and advertisingp. 447
The working womanp. 447
Subcultural interactionp. 448
Summaryp. 449
Discussion Questionsp. 449
Exercisesp. 449
Key Termsp. 450
Notesp. 450
Cross-Cultural Consumer Behavior: An International Perspectivep. 454
The imperative to be multinationalp. 456
Acquiring exposure to other culturesp. 457
Country-of-origin effectsp. 458
What is national identity?p. 458
Cross-cultural consumer analysisp. 459
Similarities and differences among peoplep. 459
The growing global middle classp. 462
Acculturation is a needed marketing viewpointp. 465
Applying research techniquesp. 465
Alternative multinational strategies: global versus localp. 466
Favoring a world brandp. 467
Are global brands different?p. 467
Multinational reactions to brand extensionsp. 469
Adaptive global marketingp. 469
Frameworks for assessing multinational strategiesp. 470
Cross-cultural psychographic segmentationp. 473
Summaryp. 475
Discussion Questionsp. 475
Exercisesp. 476
Key Termsp. 476
Notesp. 477
The Consumer's Decision-Making Processp. 480
Consumer Influence and the Diffusion of Innovationsp. 480
What is opinion leadership?p. 482
Word-of-mouth in today's always in contact worldp. 482
Dynamics of the opinion leadership processp. 483
Credibilityp. 483
Positive and negative product informationp. 484
Information and advicep. 484
Opinion leadership is category specificp. 484
Opinion leadership is a two-way streetp. 484
The motivation behind opinion leadershipp. 485
The needs of opinion leadersp. 485
The needs of opinion receiversp. 486
Purchase palsp. 486
Surrogate buyers versus opinion leadersp. 487
Measurement of opinion leadershipp. 488
A profile of the opinion leaderp. 490
Frequency and overlap of opinion leadershipp. 491
Market mavensp. 491
The situational environment of opinion leadershipp. 493
The interpersonal flow of communicationp. 493
Multistep flow of communication theoryp. 493
Advertising designed to stimulate/simulate word-of-mouthp. 494
Word-of-mouth may be uncontrollablep. 494
Marketers seek to take control of the opinion leadership processp. 495
Creating products with built-in buzz potentialp. 495
Strategy designed to simulate buzzp. 496
Diffusion of innovationsp. 499
The diffusion processp. 500
The innovationp. 500
The channels of communicationp. 505
The social systemp. 506
Timep. 507
The adoption processp. 511
Stages in the adoption processp. 511
The adoption process and information sourcesp. 513
A profile of the consumer innovatorp. 514
Defining the consumer innovatorp. 514
Interest in the product categoryp. 514
The innovator is an opinion leaderp. 514
Personality traitsp. 515
Social characteristicsp. 517
Demographic characteristicsp. 517
Are there generalized consumer innovators?p. 517
Summaryp. 519
Discussion Questionsp. 520
Exercisesp. 521
Key Termsp. 521
Notesp. 522
Consumer Decision Making and Beyondp. 524
What is a decision?p. 526
Levels of consumer decision makingp. 526
Extensive problem solvingp. 526
Limited problem solvingp. 526
Routinized response behaviorp. 527
Models of consumers: four views of consumer decision makingp. 528
An economic viewp. 528
A passive viewp. 528
A cognitive viewp. 528
An emotional viewp. 529
A model of consumer decision makingp. 530
Inputp. 531
Processp. 532
Outputp. 545
Consumer gifting behaviorp. 547
Beyond the decision: consuming and possessingp. 552
Products have special meanings and memoriesp. 552
Relationship marketingp. 554
Summaryp. 557
Discussion Questionsp. 557
Exercisesp. 558
Key Termsp. 559
Notesp. 559
Casesp. C-1
Glossaryp. G-1
Indexp. I-1
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...