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Corporate Information Strategy and Management:  Text and Cases,9780072947755
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Corporate Information Strategy and Management: Text and Cases

by ; ;
Edition:
7th
ISBN13:

9780072947755

ISBN10:
0072947756
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
10/19/2005
Publisher(s):
McGraw-Hill/Irwin
List Price: $208.05
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Summary

Corporate Information Strategy and Management: Text and Cases 7/e by Applegate, Austin and McFarlan is written for students and managers who desire an overview of contemporary information systems technology management. It explains the relevant issues of effective management of information services activities and highlights the areas of greatest potential application of the technology. No assumptions are made concerning the reader's experience with IT, though it is presumed that the reader has some course work or work experience in administration and/or management. This text is comprised of an extensive collection of Harvard Business cases devoted to Information Technology.

Author Biography

F. Warren McFarlan is the Albert H. Gordon Professor of Business Administration Emeritus at the Harvard Business School.

Table of Contents

Preface vi
Introduction: Challenges of Managing in a Networked World 1(2)
Case I -1: Li & Fung (A): Internet Issues
3(16)
Appendix A
19(2)
MODULE ONE BUSINESS IMPACTS
21(256)
IT and Strategy
25(32)
Understanding the Forces that Shape Strategy
26(1)
Conducting a Strategy Audit
27(7)
Strategic Shifts: Evolution and Revolution
32(2)
Assessing IT Impact and Alignment
34(6)
The Strategic Grid
35(3)
The Strategic Alignment Model
38(2)
Opportunities and Risks
40(15)
The Search for Opportunities
40(8)
Strategic Risk
48(7)
Summary
55(2)
IT and Organization
57(22)
The Need for New Capabilities
58(6)
Is History Repeating Itself?
60(2)
Learning from Mistakes
62(2)
Information, Organization, and Control
64(8)
Organizing for Innovation and Execution
64(4)
Organizing for Accountability and Collaboration
68(4)
Appendix 2A Characteristics of the Hierarchy, Entrepreneurial, and Networked Organization
72(5)
Summary
77(2)
Extending the Enterprise
79(36)
Understanding Business Networks
80(8)
Framing Decisions Concerning Network Differentiation and Unit Groupings
82(2)
Framing Decisions Concerning Governance of Interdependencies
84(2)
Framing Decisions Concerning Network Ownership
86(2)
Designing Hybrid Governance Models
88(7)
NASDAQ Securities Exchange: A Collaborative Community in Action
90(1)
Laying the Foundation
91(1)
From Flawless Execution to Innovation
92(1)
Role of IT in Operating and Governing the NASDAQ Securities Exchange
93(1)
Linking IT to the Evolution of Partnerships and Trust
94(1)
Building Collaborative Community: Lessons from the Field
95(4)
Key Insight: Hybrid Forms of Governance Are Emerging That Unite Hierarchy, Market, and Partnership
96(1)
Key Insight: A Network Orchestrator Role is Emerging to Coordinate Inter-Firm Interdependencies within Business Ecosystems, Like NASDAQ and GHX
97(1)
Key Insight: Network Orchestrators Design Organizational Solutions That Reflect the Interests of All Parties
97(1)
Key Insight: Collaborative Community and Trust Co-evolve Over Time
98(1)
Summary
99(1)
Appendix 3A Emerging Network Business Models
100(15)
Making the Case for IT
115(162)
Building the Business Case for IT
118(16)
Leveraging Infrastructure and Creating Options
120(5)
Driving Profitable Growth
125(1)
Achieving Proprietary Advantage
126(1)
IBM's Decade of Transformation: A Case Study in Turnaround Leadership and Delivering IT-Enabled Business Value
126(8)
Nicholas Carr Revisited
134(1)
Summary
135(2)
Case 1-1: Charles Schwab in 2002
137(26)
Case 1-2: Learning from LeapFrog
163(29)
Case 1-3: Wyndham International: Fostering High-Touch with High-Tech
192(28)
Case 1-4: Global Healthcare Exchange
220(28)
Reading 1-5: IT Doesn't Matter
248(29)
MODULE TWO MANAGING INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS
277(140)
Understanding Internetworking Infrastructure
279(26)
The Drivers of Change: Better Chips, Better Pipes
281(4)
The Basic Components of Internetworking Infrastructures
285(11)
The Technological Elements of Networks
286(3)
The Technological Elements of Processing Systems
289(3)
The Technological Elements of Facilities
292(2)
Operational Characteristics of Internetworks
294(2)
The Rise of Internetworking: Business Implications
296(6)
The Emergence of Real-Time Infrastructures
297(2)
Broader Exposure to Operational Threats
299(1)
New Models of Service Delivery
300(2)
Managing Legacies
302(1)
The Future of Internetworking Infrastructure
302(1)
Summary
303(2)
Assuring Reliable and Secure IT Services
305(26)
Availability Math
307(3)
The Availability of Components in Series
307(2)
The Effect of Redundancy on Availability
309(1)
High-Availability Facilities
310(4)
Uninterruptible Electric Power Delivery
310(1)
Physical Security
311(1)
Climate Control and Fire Suppression
311(1)
Network Connectivity
311(1)
N + 1 and N + N Redundancy
312(2)
Securing Infrastructure against Malicious Threats
314(15)
Classification of Threats
315(4)
Defensive Measures
319(5)
A Security Management Framework
324(1)
Risk Management of Availability and Security
325(2)
Incident Management and Disaster Recovery
327(1)
Managing Incidents before They Occur
327(1)
Managing during an Incident
328(1)
Managing after an Incident
328(1)
Summary
329(2)
Managing Diverse IT Infrastructures
331(86)
New Service Models
333(5)
On Demand, Utility, and Grid Computing Models
336(2)
Managing Risk through Incremental Outsourcing
338(4)
An Incremental Outsourcing Example: Hosting
340(2)
Managing Relationships with Service Providers
342(6)
Selecting Service Partners
343(2)
Relationship Management
345(3)
Managing Legacies
348(3)
Managing IT Infrastructure Assets
351(1)
Summary
352(1)
Case 2-1: CareGroup
353(16)
Case 2-2: The Premier Company: Denial of Service Attack (A)
369(8)
Case 2-3: Ford Motor Company: Supply Chain Strategy
377(7)
Reading 2-4: The Power of Virtual Integration: An Interview with Dell Computer's Michael Dell
384(11)
Case 2-5: Postgirot Bank and Provment AB: Managing the Cost of IT Operations
395(22)
MODULE THREE LEADERSHIP ISSUES
417(174)
Organizing and Leading the IT Function
419(18)
Organizational Issues in the Control of IT Activities
419(4)
From Centralized, IT-Driven Innovation to Decentralized, User-Driven Innovation
421(1)
User-Driven Innovation over IT Department Protests
421(1)
From Decentralized, User-Driven Innovation to Centralized IT Management
421(1)
From Decentralized, User-Driven Innovation to Unexpected Centralized Innovation
422(1)
Implications and Conclusions
423(1)
Drivers toward User Dominance
423(2)
Pent-Up User Demand
423(1)
The Need for Staff Flexibility
424(1)
Growth in the IT Services Industry
424(1)
Users' Desire to Control Their Own Destiny
424(1)
Fit with the Organization
425(1)
Drivers toward a Centralized IT Structure
425(4)
Staff Professionalism
425(1)
Standard Setting and Ensuring System Maintainability
426(1)
Envisioning Possibilities and Determining Feasibility
427(1)
Corporate Data Management
427(1)
Cost Estimation and Analysis
428(1)
Coordination and Location of IT Policy
429(4)
IT Responsibilities
429(2)
User Responsibilities
431(1)
General Management Support and Policy Overview
431(2)
IT Leadership and the Management of Budgets
433(1)
Summary
434(3)
Managing IT Outsourcing
437(16)
Why Outsourcing Alliances Are So Difficult
438(1)
Outsourcing in Retrospect
439(1)
Outsourcing in the Twenty-First Century
439(2)
Acceptance of Strategic Alliances
440(1)
IT's Changing Environment
440(1)
What Drives Outsourcing?
441(4)
General Managers' Concerns about Costs and Quality
442(1)
Breakdown in IT Performance
442(1)
Intense Vendor Pressures
443(1)
Simplified General Management Agenda
443(1)
Financial Factors
443(1)
Corporate Culture
444(1)
Eliminating an Internal Irritant
444(1)
Other Factors
444(1)
When to Outsource
445(2)
Position on the Strategic Grid
445(1)
Development Portfolio
446(1)
Organizational Learning
446(1)
A Firm's Position in the Market
447(1)
Current IT Organization
447(1)
Structuring the Alliance
447(3)
Contract Flexibility
447(1)
Standards and Control
447(1)
Areas to Outsource
448(1)
Cost Savings
448(1)
Supplier Stability and Quality
449(1)
Management Fit
449(1)
Conversion Problems
450(1)
Managing the Alliance
450(2)
The CIO Function
450(1)
Performance Measurement
451(1)
Mix and Coordination of Tasks
451(1)
Customer-Vendor Interface
452(1)
Summary
452(1)
A Portfolio Approach to Managing IT Projects
453(138)
Sources of Implementation Risk
454(1)
Project Categories and Degrees of Risk
455(6)
Assessing Risk for Individual Projects
456(1)
Managing the ``Dip'' during Project Implementation
457(2)
Portfolio Risk
459(2)
Project Management: A Contingency Approach
461(10)
Management Tools
461(1)
Influences on Tool Selection
462(4)
Relative Contribution of Management Tools
466(1)
Emergence of Adaptive Project Management Methods
466(1)
Software Development Life Cycles
466(2)
Adaptive Methodologies
468(1)
Adaptive Methods and Change Management
469(1)
Process Consistency and Agility in Project Management
470(1)
Summary
471(2)
Case 3-1: Cathay Pacific: Doing More with Less
473(22)
Case 3-2: Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd.
495(26)
Case 3-3: Rakuten
521(20)
Case 3-4: Telecomunicacoes de Sao Paulo SA (Telesp)
541(36)
Case 3-5: Outsourcing IT: The Global Landscape in 2004
577(14)
CONCLUSION The Challenges of Managing in a Network Economy Revisited
591(46)
Case C-1: UCB: Managing Information for Globalization and Innovation (A) (Abridged)
594(18)
Case C-2: Enabling Business Strategy with IT at the World Bank
612(25)
Annotated Bibliography 637(4)
Index 641


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