9780199251612

Critical Scientific Realism

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780199251612

  • ISBN10:

    0199251614

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2002-05-02
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press

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Summary

This book comes to the rescue of scientific realism, showing that reports of its death have been greatly exaggerated. Philosophical realism holds that the aim of a particular discourse is to make true statements about its subject matter. Ilkka Niiniluoto surveys different kinds of realism in various areas of philosophy and then sets out his own critical realist philosophy of science.

Table of Contents

The Varieties of Realism
1(20)
The problems of realism
1(3)
Science and other belief systems
4(5)
Critical scientific realism and its rivals
9(4)
Realism and the method of philosophy
13(8)
Realism in Ontology
21(21)
Materialism, dualism, and idealism
21(2)
Popper's three worlds
23(2)
Existence, mind-independence, and reality
25(3)
The world and its furniture
28(8)
Arguments for ontological realism
36(6)
Realism in Semantics
42(37)
Language as representation
42(5)
Logical, analytic, and factual truth
47(4)
How semantics is effable: model theory
51(4)
Truth as correspondence: Tarski's definition
55(9)
Truthlikeness
64(15)
Realism in Epistemology
79(30)
Certainty, scepticism, and fallibilism
79(6)
Knowledge of the external world
85(3)
Kant's `Copernican revolution'
88(3)
Critical epistemological realism
91(4)
Epistemic probability and verisimilitude
95(5)
Epistemic theories of truth
100(9)
Realism in Theory Construction
109(51)
Descriptivism, instrumentalism, and realism
109(11)
Meaning variance, reference, and theoretical terms
120(12)
Laws, truthlikeness, and idealization
132(12)
Examples of the realism debate
144(16)
Realism in Methodology
160(45)
Measuring the success of science
160(10)
Axiology and methodological rules
170(4)
Theory-choice, underdetermination, and simplicity
174(11)
From empirical success to truthlikeness
185(7)
Explaining the success of science
192(6)
Rationality and progress in science
198(7)
Internal Realism
205(22)
Ways of worldmaking
205(6)
Putnam on internal realism
211(7)
World-versions and identified objects
218(9)
Relativism
227(25)
Varieties of relativism
227(2)
Moral relativism
229(7)
Cognitive relativism
236(6)
Feminist philosophy of science
242(10)
Social Constructivism
252(27)
The Edinburgh programme: strong or wrong?
253(9)
Finitism
262(6)
Life in laboratory
268(11)
Realism, Science, and Society
279(23)
Social reasons for realism and anti-realism
280(8)
Science as a cultural value
288(5)
Science in a free society
293(9)
References 302(29)
Index of Names 331(8)
Index of Subjects 339

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