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Cultural Resources Archaeology : An Introduction

by ; ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780759118461

ISBN10:
0759118469
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
3/30/2010
Publisher(s):
Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc
List Price: $37.95
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Summary

Most students who pursue a career in archaeology will find employment in cultural resource management (CRM), rather than in academia or traditional fieldwork. It is CRM, the protection and preservation of archaeological and other resources, that offers the jobs and provides the funding. Few textbooks, however, are dedicated to teaching students the techniques and practices of this field. Cultural Resources Archaeology, now brought completely up date in this second edition and replete with new case studies from the western U.S., fills in the gap. Drawing on their decades of teaching and field experience, the authors walk students through the intricacies of CRM. They clearly describe the processes of designing a project, conducting assessment, testing, doing essential mitigation work (Phases I, II, and III), and preparing reports. The book's emphasis on real-world problems and issues, use of extensive examples from around the country, and practical advice on everything from law to logistics make it an ideal teaching tool for archaeology students who dream of becoming practicing archaeologists.

Author Biography

Thomas W. Neumann works as an archaeologist for a private firm. Robert M. Sanford is professor of environmental science and policy at the University of Southern Maine. Karen G. Harry is associate professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

Table of Contents

Prefacep. vii
Acknowledgmentsp. ix
An Overview of Professional Archaeologyp. 1
Laws, Regulations, and Guidelinesp. 29
Preparing the Project Backgroundp. 61
The Phase I Process: Identification of Possible Historic Propertiesp. 93
The Phase II Process: Testing and Evaluationp. 135
The Phase III Process: Mitigation through Data Recoveryp. 175
Report Preparation and Productionp. 203
Notesp. 231
Referencesp. 241
Indexp. 253
About the Authorsp. 259
Table of Contents provided by Ingram. All Rights Reserved.


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