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Curious Researcher : A Guide to Writing Research Papers

by
Edition:
6th
ISBN13:

9780321366498

ISBN10:
0321366492
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2009
Publisher(s):
Longman

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 6th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2009.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.

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Summary

Featuring an engaging, direct writing style and inquiry-based approach, The Curious Researcher stresses that curiosity is the best reason for investigating ideas and information. KEY BENEFIT: Offering a wide variety of examples from writers, this popular guide shows that good research and lively writing do not have to be mutually exclusive. Readers are encouraged to find ways to bring their writing to life, even though they are writing with "facts." Full explanations of the technical aspects of writing and documenting source-based papers help students develop sound research and analysis skills. Topics include information on selecting a research topic, the latest information on Internet research, advice on structuring a research paper, and full treatment of MLA and APA citation formats. Research, General Interest.

Table of Contents

Contents by Subject xxi
Preface xxvii
Introduction: Rethinking the Research Paper 1(26)
EXERCISE 1 Collecting Golf Balls on Driving Ranges and Other Reflections
1(3)
Learning and Unlearning
4(1)
Using This Book
4(3)
The Exercises
4(1)
The Five-Week Plan
5(1)
Alternatives to the Five-Week Plan
6(1)
The Research Paper and the Research Report
7(1)
Discovering Your Purpose
7(1)
How Formal Should It Be?
8(2)
When "Bad" Writing Is Good
9(1)
Thinking Like an Academic Writer
10(1)
"Essaying" or Arguing?
10(2)
The Research Essay and Academic Writing
12(2)
Becoming an Authority by Using Authorities
14(1)
"It's Just My Opinion"
15(1)
Facts Don't Kill
15(12)
EXERCISE 2 Reflecting on "The Bothersome Beauty of Pigeons" by Bruce Ballenger
16(9)
The Question Habit
25(2)
Chapter 1 The First Week 27(36)
The Importance of Getting Curious
27(11)
Learning to Wonder Again
27(1)
Getting the Pot Boiling
28(4)
EXERCISE 1.1 Building an Interest Inventory
29(3)
Other Ways to Find a Topic
32(2)
What Is a Good Topic?
34(2)
Checking Out Your Tentative Topic
35(1)
Making the Most of an Assigned Topic
36(12)
EXERCISE 1.2 The Myth of the Boring Topic
36(2)
Developing a Working Knowledge
38(10)
EXERCISE 1.3 Getting a Lay of the Land
39(1)
The Reference Librarian: A Living Source
40(1)
The Library of Congress Subject Headings: Your Topic in the Larger Landscape
40(2)
Encyclopedias and Surveying the Landscape
42(2)
Surveying the Electronic Landscape
44(1)
Subject Search
44(4)
Narrowing the Subject
48(7)
Circling the Lighthouse
50(1)
From Landscape Shots to Close-Ups
51(7)
EXERCISE 1.4 Finding the Questions
51(2)
EXERCISE 1.5 Finding the Focusing Question
53(1)
EXERCISE 1.6 Finding the Relationship
53(2)
Possible Purposes for a Research Assignment
55(3)
EXERCISE 1.7 Research Proposal
57(1)
Reading for Research
58(5)
EXERCISE 1.8 Ways of Reading to Write
58(5)
Chapter One
58(2)
Reading Rhetorically
60(1)
Reading like an Outsider
61(2)
Chapter 2 The Second Week 63(52)
Developing a Research Strategy
63(14)
The Internet Itch: Should You Scratch It First?
64(1)
Library Research Strategy
64(4)
Moving from General to Specific
65(1)
Evaluating Library Sources
65(8)
Why Journal Articles Are Better Than Magazine Articles
66(1)
Look for Often-Cited Authors
67(1)
Primary over Secondary Sources
67(1)
Not All Books Are Alike
67(1)
Internet Research Strategy
68(1)
Three Drawbacks of Internet Research
69(1)
Three Reasons to Use the Internet for Research
70(1)
The Invisible Web
71(6)
Evaluating Online Sources
73(11)
Key to Evaluating Internet Sources
74(3)
Search Languages: Words That Open Doors
77(5)
Controlled Language Searches
78(1)
Boolean Searching
78(2)
Magic Words on the World Wide Web
80(2)
Developing Deep Knowledge
82(2)
Library Research Techniques
84(9)
Finding Books
84(1)
Understanding Call Numbers
85(8)
EXERCISE 2.1 Library Investigations
86(2)
Coming Up Empty-Handed?
88(1)
Checking Bibliographies
88(1)
Interlibrary Loan
88(1)
Finding Magazine and Journal Articles
89(3)
Newspaper Articles
92(1)
Internet Research Techniques
93(4)
Types of Search Engines
94(3)
EXERCISE 2.2 Investigating the Internet
95(2)
Living Sources: Interviews and Surveys
97(18)
Arranging Interviews
97(9)
Finding Experts
98(1)
Finding Nonexperts
Affected by Your Topic
99(1)
Making Contact
100(1)
Conducting Interviews
100(3)
Whom to Interview?
101(1)
What Questions to Ask?
101(1)
During the Interview
102(1)
Notetaking
103(1)
The E-Mail Interview
103(3)
Finding People on the Internet
103(1)
Making Contact by E-Mail
104(1)
The Chat Room Interview
105(1)
Deciding What to Ask
105(1)
Finding a Group on Your Topic
106(1)
Planning Informal Surveys
106(5)
Defining Goals and Audience
106(1)
Types of Questions
107(1)
Survey Design
108(3)
Avoid Loaded Questions
108(1)
Avoid Vague Questions
108(2)
Drawbacks of Open-Ended Questions
110(1)
Designing Your Multiple-Choice Questions
110(1)
Continuum Questions
110(1)
Planning for Distribution
111(1)
Conducting Surveys
111(4)
Distribution
111(1)
The Internet Survey
112(3)
Chapter 3 The Third Week 115(50)
Writing in the Middle
115(22)
Becoming an Activist Notetaker
116(4)
EXERCISE 3.1 Getting a Word in Edgewise
117(3)
EXERCISE 3.2 "Say Back" to a Source
120(1)
Recognizing Plagiarism
120(1)
I Read What You Said and Borrowed It, Okay?
120(3)
Why Plagiarism Matters
123(1)
Sources Are from Mars, Notetakers Are from Venus
123(9)
Paraphrasing
124(2)
EXERCISE 3.3 Paraphrase Practice
125(1)
Summarizing
126(2)
Quoting
128(20)
When to Quote
128(2)
Quoting Fairly
130(1)
EXERCISE 3.4 How Your Notes Can Make Music
130(2)
"Self-Assured, Stressed, and Straight," by Kathleen Phalen
132(5)
Notetaking Techniques
137(11)
The Double-Entry Journal
140(8)
Other Notetaking Techniques
148(7)
The Research Log: A Jay Leno Approach
148(3)
Narrative Notetaking
151(4)
First Layer: Story the Source
151(1)
Second Layer: Rapid Summary
151(3)
Third Layer: Narrative of Thought
154(1)
Digging Deeper for Information: Advanced Searching Techniques
155(10)
First-Level Searching
155(1)
Second-Level Searching
155(5)
Essays and Articles Buried in Books
157(1)
Bibliographies
158(1)
Unpublished Scholarly Papers
158(1)
Searching the Invisible Web
159(1)
Using Specialized Search Engines
159(1)
Search by Author
160(1)
Third-Level Searching
160(5)
Library Sources
160(1)
Current Periodicals
160(1)
Audiovisual Departments
160(1)
Special Collections
161(1)
Interlibrary Loan
161(1)
Other Libraries
161(1)
Nonlibrary Sources
161(4)
Bookstores
162(1)
Lectures
162(1)
TV and Radio
162(1)
Image Searches
163(2)
Chapter 4 The Fourth Week 165(48)
Getting to the Draft
165(42)
When the Experts Disagree
166(10)
Evaluating Conflicting Claims
167(16)
EXERCISE 4.1 Grade Inflation: Myth or Reality?
167(1)
First Claim: Grading Has Become More Lenient
168(1)
Opposing Claim: No Substantial Grade Inflation
173(3)
Follow-Up Discussion
176(1)
EXERCISE 4.2 Reclaiming Your Topic
176(1)
An Application Example
177(5)
Deciding Whether to Say I
182(1)
Getting Personal without Being Personal
183(1)
Beginning at the Beginning
183(6)
Flashlights or Floodlights?
184(2)
Writing Multiple Leads
186(3)
EXERCISE 4.3 Three Ways In
187(2)
Deciding on a Voice
189(3)
Considering Purpose, Audience, Subject, and Who You Are
189(3)
The Differing Voices of Research
190(2)
Writing for Reader Interest
192(7)
Working the Common Ground
192(3)
Topics for Which Common Ground Is Hard to Find
194(1)
Putting People on the Page
195(1)
Using Case Studies
195(1)
Using Interviews
195(1)
Writing a Strong Ending
196(2)
Endings to Avoid
196(2)
Using Surprise
198(1)
Considering Patterns of Development
199(1)
The Exploratory Research Essay
199(3)
The Argumentative Research Paper
202(1)
Writing with Sources
202(5)
Blending Kinds of Writing and Sources
203(4)
Handling Quotes
204(1)
Handling Interview Material
205(2)
Trusting Your Memory
207(1)
Citing Sources
207(6)
An Alternative to Colliding Footnotes
207(1)
I Hate These Theses to Pieces
208(2)
Driving Through the First Draft
210(3)
A Draft Is Something the Wind Blows Through
210(3)
Chapter 5 The Fifth Week 213(34)
Revising for Purpose
213(13)
EXERCISE 5.1 Wrestling with the Draft
214(2)
The Thesis as a Tool for Revision
216(5)
EXERCISE 5.2 Dissecting the Fish
220(1)
Using a Reader
221(2)
What You Need from a Reader
221(4)
EXERCISE 5.3 Directing the Reader's Response
222(1)
Attacking the Draft
223(3)
EXERCISE 5.4 Cut-and-Paste Revision
223(2)
Examining the Wreckage
225(1)
Revising for Information
226(1)
Finding Quick Facts
226(1)
Revising for Language
227(11)
Listening to the Voice
227(2)
Avoid Sounding Glib
229(1)
How to Control Information
229(3)
Scrutinizing Paragraphs
232(1)
How Well Do You Integrate Sources?
232(1)
Is Each Paragraph Unified?
232(1)
Scrutinizing Sentences
232(5)
Using Active Voice
232(2)
Using Strong Verbs
234(1)
Varying Sentence Length
234(2)
Editing for Simplicity
236(2)
EXERCISE 5.5 Cutting Clutter
237(1)
Stock Phrases in Research Papers
237(1)
Preparing the Final Manuscript
238(8)
Considering "Reader-Friendly" Design
239(1)
Following MLA Conventions
240(1)
Proofreading Your Paper
240(9)
Proofreading on a Computer
240(1)
Looking Closely
241(1)
EXERCISE 5.6 Picking Off the Lint
241(1)
Ten Common Mistakes
242(2)
Using the "Find" Function
244(1)
Avoiding Sexist Language
245(1)
Looking Back and Moving On
246(1)
Appendix A Guide to MLA Style 247(58)
Part One: Citing Sources in Your Essay
249(10)
1.1 When to Cite
249(1)
The Common Knowledge Exception
249(1)
1.2 The MLA Author/Page System
249(10)
The Basics of Using Parenthetical Citation
250(7)
1.2.1 Placement of Citations
251(2)
1.2.2 When You Mention the Author's Name
253(1)
1.2.3 When There Is No Author
253(1)
1.2.4 Works by the Same Author
254(1)
1.2.5 Indirect Sources
255(1)
1.2.6 Personal Interviews
256(1)
1.2.7 Several Sources in a Single Citation
256(1)
Sample Parenthetical References for Other Sources
257(2)
1.2.8 An Entire Work
257(1)
1.2.9 A Volume of a Multivolume Work
257(1)
1.2.10 Several Sources for a Single Passage
257(1)
1.2.11 A Literary Work
257(1)
1.2.12 An Online Source
258(1)
Part Two: Format
259(4)
2.1 The Layout
259(4)
2.1.1 Printing or Typing
259(1)
2.1.2 Margins and Spacing
259(1)
2.1.3 Title Page
260(1)
2.1.4 Pagination
260(1)
2.1.5 Placement of Tables, Charts, and Illustrations
260(1)
2.1.6 Handling Titles
261(1)
2.1.7 Italics and Underlinings
262(1)
2.1.8 Language and Style
262(1)
Names
262(1)
Ellipsis
262(1)
Quotations
262(1)
Part Three: Preparing the "Works Cited" Page
263(29)
3.1 Format
264(1)
Alphabetizing the List
264(1)
Indenting and Spacing
264(1)
3.2 Citing Books
265(7)
Title
266(1)
Edition
266(1)
Publication Place, Publisher, and Date
266(1)
Page Numbers
266(1)
Sample Book Citations
267(1)
3.2.1 A Book by One Author
267(1)
3.2.2 A Book by Two Authors
267(1)
3.2.3 A Book with More Than Three Authors
267(1)
3.2.4 Several Books by the Same Author
267(1)
3.2.5 A Collection or Anthology
268(1)
3.2.6 A Work in a Collection or Anthology
268(1)
3.2.7 An Introduction, Preface, Foreword, or Prologue
268(1)
3.2.8 A Book with No Author
269(1)
3.2.9 An Encyclopedia
269(1)
3.2.10 A Book with an Institutional Author
269(1)
3.2.11 A Book with Multiple Volumes
269(1)
3.2.12 A Book That Is Not a First Edition
270(1)
3.2.13 A Book Published Before 1900
270(1)
3.2.14 A Translation
270(1)
3.2.15 Government Documents
270(1)
3.2.16 A Book That Was Republished
271(1)
3.2.17 An Online Book
271(1)
3.3 Citing Periodicals
272(5)
Author's Name
272(1)
Article Title
272(1)
Periodical Title
272(1)
Volume Number
272(1)
Date
273(1)
Page Numbers
273(1)
Sample Periodical Citations
273(1)
3.3.1 A Magazine Article
273(1)
3.3.2 A Journal Article
274(1)
3.3.3 A Newspaper Article
274(1)
3.3.4 An Article with No Author
275(1)
3.3.5 An Editorial
275(1)
3.3.6 A Letter to the Editor
276(1)
3.3.7 A Review
276(1)
3.3.8 An Abstract
276(1)
3.4 Citing Nonprint and Other Sources
277(4)
3.4.1 An Interview
277(1)
3.4.2 Surveys, Questionnaires, and Case Studies
278(1)
3.4.3 Recordings
278(1)
3.4.4 Television and Radio Programs
279(1)
3.4.5 Films, Videotapes, and DVD
279(1)
3.4.6 Artwork
280(1)
3.4.7 An Advertisement
280(1)
3.4.8 Lectures and Speeches
280(1)
3.4.9 Pamphlets
281(1)
3.5 Citing CD-Roms and Other "Portable" Databases
281(2)
3.5.1 A Nonperiodical Database
281(1)
3.5.2 A Periodical Database
282(1)
3.6 Citing Online Databases
283(9)
Other Recent Changes by the MLA
284(1)
Is It Also in Print?
284(1)
Address Mistakes Are Fatal
285(1)
Sample Online Citations
286(1)
3.6.1 An Article
286(1)
3.6.2 An Article or Abstract in a Library Database
286(1)
3.6.3 An Online Book
287(3)
3.6.4 A Personal or Professional Web Site
290(1)
3.6.5 An Online Posting
290(1)
3.6.6 An E-Mail Message
291(1)
3.6.7 A Sound Clip
291(1)
3.6.8 An Interview
292(1)
3.6.9 Synchronous Communication (MOOS, MUDS, IRCS)
292(1)
Part Four: Student Essay in MLA Style
292(13)
"Big Picture Dreams" by Carolyn Thorne
294(11)
Appendix B Guide to APA Style 305(38)
Part One: How the Essay Should Look
308(6)
1.1 The Layout
308(6)
1.1.1 Page Format
308(1)
1.1.2 Title Page
308(1)
1.1.3 Abstract
309(1)
1.1.4 Body of the Paper
309(2)
1.1.5 Handling Quoted Material
311(1)
1.1.6 References Page
312(1)
1.1.7 Appendix
312(1)
1.1.8 Notes
312(1)
1.1.9 Tables and Figures
313(1)
1.1.10 Language and Style
313(1)
Part Two: Citing Sources in Your Essay
314(4)
2.1 The APA Author/Page System
314(4)
2.1.1 When the Author Is Mentioned in the Text
314(1)
2.1.2 When the Author Isn't Mentioned in the Text
314(1)
2.1.3 When to Cite Page Numbers
314(1)
2.1.4 A Single Work by Two or More Authors
315(1)
2.1.5 A Work with No Author
315(1)
2.1.6 Two or More Works by the Same Author
315(1)
2.1.7 An Institutional Author
316(1)
2.1.8 Multiple Works in the Same Parentheses
316(1)
2.1.9 Interviews, E-Mail, and Letters
317(1)
2.1.10 New Editions of Old Works
317(1)
2.1.11 A Web Site
317(1)
Part Three: Preparing the "References" List
318(13)
3.1 Order of Sources
318(1)
3.2 Order of Information
318(2)
Author
318(1)
Date
319(1)
Article or Book Title
319(1)
Periodical Title and Publication Information
319(1)
3.3 Sample References
320(6)
3.3.1 A Journal Article
320(1)
3.3.2 A Journal Article Not Paginated Continuously
320(1)
3.3.3 A Magazine Article
320(1)
3.3.4 A Newspaper Article
321(1)
3.3.5 A Book
321(1)
3.3.6 A Book or Article with More Than One Author
321(1)
3.3.7 A Book or Article with an Unknown Author
321(1)
3.3.8 An Encyclopedia Entry
322(1)
3.3.9 A Book with an Institutional Author
322(1)
3.3.10 A Book with an Editor
322(1)
3.3.11 A Selection in a Book with an Editor
323(1)
3.3.12 A Republished Work
323(1)
3.3.13 An Abstract
323(1)
3.3.14 A Source Mentioned by Another Source
324(1)
3.3.15 A Book Review
324(1)
3.3.16 A Government Document
324(1)
3.3.17 A Letter to the Editor
324(1)
3.3.18 A Published Interview
325(1)
3.3.19 A Film or Videotape
325(1)
3.3.20 A Television Program
325(1)
3.3.21 A Musical Recording
326(1)
3.3.22 A Computer Program
326(1)
3.4 Citing Electronic Sources
326(5)
3.4.1 An Electronic Version of an Article Also in Print
326(1)
3.4.2 An Article Only on the Internet
327(1)
3.4.3 An Electronic Text
327(1)
3.4.4 An Article or Abstract from a Library Database
328(1)
3.4.5 A Part of a Work
328(1)
3.4.6 An Online Journal
329(1)
3.4.7 A Newspaper Article
329(1)
3.4.8 A Web Page
329(1)
3.4.9 Discussion Lists
330(1)
3.4.10 E-Mail
331(1)
3.4.11 CD-ROM Databases and Encyclopedias
331(1)
Part Four: Sample Paper in APA Style
331(12)
"What's Love Got to Do with It? Compatability and Marital Success" by Jennifer Suittor
333(10)
Appendix C Tips for Researching and Writing Papers on Literary Topics 343(24)
Mine the Primary Source
343(1)
Search Strategies
344(3)
Researching the Author
345(1)
Biographies
345(1)
Primary Bibliographies
345(1)
Researching the Critics
346(1)
Researching the Genre or Tradition
346(1)
Sample Essay: Personal Response
347(12)
"I Can Relate to It" Is Only a Start
348(1)
"Breaking the 'Utter Silence': A Response to Orwell's 'Marrakech'," by Kazuko Kuramoto
349(10)
Sample Critical Essay: Formal Response
359(8)
"Nature as Being: Landscape in Silko's 'Lullaby'," by Julie Bird
360(7)
Index 367


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