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The Curious Writer

by
ISBN13:

9780321095312

ISBN10:
0321095316
Format:
Hardcover
Pub. Date:
1/1/2005
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $84.00
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Summary

Written with a strong personal voice that respects students and the writing challenges they face.The Curious Writeris not like other textbooks on the market today. Where the tone of other books is usually dry and detached,The Curious Writeris familiar and inviting. The author shuns a pedantic writing style and instead reaches out to students on equal terms, invoking his own writing experiences and those of his students as a way of illustrating the process of becoming a better writer. The author's voice is one that teaches by example rather than rule.A strong emphasis on critical reading skills.The Curious Writerbelieves that writing and reading are complementary skills. The book also holds that in today's media saturated world the ability to read well extends beyond the printed word to visual messages.For anyone wanting to improve their writing skills.

Table of Contents

Instructor Preface xxxiii
Student Preface xlix
Part One THE SPIRIT OF INQUIRY
Writing as Inquiry
3(34)
Motives for Writing
4(1)
Beliefs About Writing
5(6)
Exercise 1.1 What Do You Believe?
5(2)
One Student's Response Jon's Journal
7(1)
Inquiring into the Details Journals
7(1)
Unlearning Unhelpful Beliefs
8(1)
The Beliefs of This Book
9(1)
Inquiring into the Details Portfolios
10(1)
Writing Situations and Rhetorical Choices
11(2)
Habits of Mind
13(7)
Start with Questions, Not Answers
13(1)
Suspend Judgment
14(1)
Writing with Computers
15(1)
Search for Surprise
16(1)
Exercise 1.2 A Roomful of Details
16(1)
One Student's Response Margaret's Journal
17(1)
Inquiring into the Details Invention Strategies
18(2)
Writing as a Process
20(14)
Recognizing the Challenges
20(1)
Exercise 1.3 What Is Your Process?
21(4)
Thinking About Your Process
25(1)
Linear versus Recursive Models
26(2)
Dialectical Thinking
28(1)
Exercise 1.4 Practicing Dialectical Thinking
28(1)
One Student's Response Jon's Journal
29(5)
Exercise 1.5 Overcome Your Own Challenges
34(1)
Using What You Have Learned
34(3)
Reading as Inquiry
37(28)
Motives for Reading
38(1)
Beliefs About Reading
39(2)
Exercise 2.1 What Do You Believe?
39(2)
Reading Situations and Rhetorical Choices
41(2)
Reading as a Process
43(15)
Linear versus Recursive Models
43(1)
Exercise 2.2. Reading Strategies
44(1)
Reading Jack Hitt, Excerpt from ``Dinosaur Dreams''
44(2)
Inquiring into the Details Reading Perspectives
46(1)
Dialectical Thinking
47(1)
Believing and Doubting
48(1)
Exercise 2.3 Practicing Dialectical Thinking
49(1)
Reading Bruce Ballenger, ``The Importance of Writing Badly''
49(3)
One Student's Response Todd's Journal
52(1)
Inquiring into the Details The Double-Entry Journal
53(1)
Adapting to Unfamiliar Reading Situations
54(1)
Exercise 2.4 Further Practice: An Adaptive Response
55(1)
Reading David W. Noble, Excerpt from The Forces of Production: A Social History of Industrial Automation
55(2)
Writing with Computers
57(1)
``Reading'' Images
58(5)
Some Strategies for Reading Images
58(2)
Exercise 2.5 Reading Images
60(3)
Using What You Have Learned
63(2)
Ways of Inquiring
65(30)
Opening Questions for Inquiry
66(2)
Exploration
68(4)
Exercise 3.1 Exploring ``Migrant Mother''
70(1)
One Student's Response Lana's Journal
71(1)
Explanation
72(5)
Exercise 3.2 Explaining a Marketing Strategy
75(1)
One Student's Response David's Journal
75(2)
Evaluation
77(5)
Exercise 3.3 Evaluating ``Generation X Goes to College''
80(1)
Reading Peter Sacks, excerpt from ``Generation X Goes to College''
81(1)
One Student's Response Margaret's Journal
81(1)
Reflection
82(3)
Exercise 3.4 Reflecting on Your Process
84(1)
One Student's Response Maria's Journal
85(1)
Symphonic Inquiry
85(6)
Exercise 3.5 Creating Music with ``A Voice for the Lonely''
86(1)
Reading Stephen Corey, ``A Voice for the Lonely''
86(5)
Writing with Computers
91(1)
Using What You Have Learned
91(4)
Part Two INQUIRY PROJECTS
Writing a Personal Essay
95(52)
Writing About Experience
95(1)
Motives for Writing a Personal Essay
96(1)
Personal Essays and Academic Writing
97(1)
Features of the Form
97(25)
Personal Essay George Orwell, ``A Hanging''
98(5)
Inquiring into the Essay
103(1)
Personal Essay Barbara Kingsolver, ``Life Without Go-Go Boots''
104(3)
Inquiring into the Essay
107(1)
Personal Essay Bailey White, ``Forbidden Things''
108(3)
Inquiring into the Essay
111(1)
Personal Essay Judith Ortiz Cofer, ``Silent Dancing''
112(7)
Inquiring into the Essay
119(1)
Seeing the Form Self Portrait by Frances Benjamin Johnson
120(1)
Exercise 4.1 Photographic Autobiography
121(1)
The Writing Process
122(22)
Thinking About Subjects
122(1)
Generating Ideas
123(1)
One Student's Response Margaret's Journal
123(1)
Listing Prompts
123(1)
Fastwriting Prompts
124(1)
Visual Prompts
124(2)
Inquiring into the Details Clustering or Mapping
126(1)
Research Prompts
127(1)
Judging What You Have
127(1)
What's Promising Material and What Isn't?
128(1)
Questions About Purpose and Audience
128(1)
Questions for Reflection
129(1)
Writing the Sketch
129(1)
Writing with Computers
130(1)
Student Sketch Lana Kuchta, ``The Way I Remember''
131(2)
Moving from Sketch to Draft
133(1)
Evaluating Your Own Sketch
133(1)
Questions for Peer Review
134(1)
Reflecting on What You've Learned
134(1)
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
134(2)
Composing the Draft
136(1)
Methods of Development
136(1)
Using Evidence
137(1)
Workshopping the Draft
138(1)
Reflecting on the Draft
138(1)
Questions for Readers
138(1)
Revising the Draft
139(1)
Polishing the Draft
140(1)
Student Essay Micaela Fisher, ``Holy Jealousy''
140(3)
Evaluating the Essay
143(1)
Using What You Have Learned
144(3)
Writing a Profile
147(48)
Writing About People
147(1)
Motives for Writing a Profile
148(1)
The Profile and Academic Writing
149(1)
Features of the Form
150(19)
Profile Anonymous, ``Soup''
151(3)
Inquiring into the Essay
154(1)
Profile Lauren Slater, ``Dr. Daedalus''
155(4)
Inquiring into the Essay
159(1)
Profile Rudolph Chelminski, ``Turning Point''
159(8)
Inquiring into the Essay
167(1)
Seeing the Form Consuelo Cloos by Judy Dater
168(1)
The Writing Process
169
Thinking About Subjects
169(1)
Generating Ideas
170(1)
Listing Prompts
170(1)
One Student's Response Bruce's Journal
170(1)
Fastwriting Prompts
170(1)
Visual Prompts
171(1)
Research Prompts
171(1)
One Student's Response Bruce's Journal
172(1)
Judging What You Have
172(1)
What's Promising Material and What Isn't?
172(2)
Questions About Purpose and Audience
174(1)
Interviewing
175(1)
Making Contact
176(1)
Conducting the Interview
177(1)
Inquiring into the Details Tape Recorders
177(1)
Listening and Watching
178(2)
Selected Interview Notes Margaret Parker, ``Medical Student''
180(1)
Writing the Sketch
181(1)
Moving from Sketch to Draft
182(1)
Evaluating Your Own Sketch
182(1)
Questions for Peer Review
182(1)
Reflecting on What You've Learned
183(1)
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
183(1)
Composing the Draft
184(1)
Writing with Computers
184(1)
Methods of Development
185(1)
Using Evidence
185(1)
Workshopping the Draft
186(1)
Reflecting on the Draft
186(1)
Questions for Readers
186(1)
Revising the Draft
186(2)
Polishing the Draft
188(1)
Student Essay Margaret Parker, ``Medical Student''
188(4)
Evaluating the Essay
192
Using What You Have Learned
Writing a Review
195(44)
Writing That Evaluates
195(1)
Motives for Writing a Review
196(1)
The Review and Academic Writing
197(1)
Features of the Form
198(17)
Review Bryan Curtis, ``The Best Little Chophouse in Town''
200(3)
Inquiring into the Essay
203(1)
Review Neal Pollack, ``Rock On? Yeah, in Chairs''
203(4)
Inquiring into the Essay
207(1)
Review Ann Hodgman, ``No Wonder They Call Me a Bitch''
207(5)
Inquiring into the Essay
212(1)
Seeing the Form Choosing the Best Picture
213(1)
Exercise 6.1 What Makes a Good Movie?
214(1)
One Student's Response Margaret's Journal
215(1)
The Writing Process
215(22)
Thinking About Subjects
216(1)
Generating Ideas
216(1)
Listing Prompts
216(1)
Fastwriting Prompts
217(1)
Visual Prompts
217(1)
Research Prompts
217(1)
Writing with Computers
218(1)
Judging What You Have
218(1)
What's Promising Material and What Isn't?
218(1)
Questions About Audience and Purpose
219(1)
Exercise 6.2 From Jury to Judgment
220(2)
One Student's Response Amy's Journal
222(1)
Thinking About Criteria
222(1)
Inquiring into the Details Collaborating on Criteria
223(1)
Writing the Sketch
224(1)
Student Sketch Mike Peterson, ``Gladiator: Good Hollywood''
224(2)
Moving from Sketch to Draft
226(1)
Evaluating Your Own Sketch
226(1)
Questions for Peer Review
227(1)
Reflecting on What You've Learned
227(1)
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
227(1)
Re-experience
227(1)
Interview
228(1)
Read
228(1)
Composing the Draft
228(1)
Methods of Development
229(1)
Using Evidence
230(1)
Workshopping the Draft
231(1)
Reflecting on the Draft
231(1)
Questions for Readers
231(1)
Revising the Draft
232(1)
Polishing the Draft
233(1)
Student Essay Mike Peterson, ``Open Your Eyes, Cameron Crowe''
233(3)
Evaluating the Essay
236(1)
Using What You Have Learned
237(2)
Writing a Proposal
239(44)
Writing About Problems and Solutions
239(3)
Problems of Consequence
240(1)
Problems of Scale
241(1)
Motives for Writing Proposals
242(1)
The Proposal and Academic Writing
243(1)
Features of the Form
243(16)
Proposal Maia Szalavitz, ``Stand and Deliver''
245(3)
Inquiring into the Essay
248(1)
Proposal James Howard Kunstler and Nikos A. Salingaros, ``The End of Tall Buildings''
248(6)
Inquiring into the Essay
254(1)
Proposal Caroline Hsu, ``Is It Time to Ditch Senior Year?''
255(2)
Inquiring into the Essay
257(1)
Seeing the Form Stop Torturing Chicks?
258(1)
One Student's Response Rositta's Journal
259(1)
The Writing Process
259(22)
Thinking About Subjects
260(1)
Generating Ideas
260(1)
Listing Prompts
260(1)
Fastwriting Prompts
260(1)
One Student's Response Caesar's Journal
261(1)
Inquiring into the Details Causation
262(1)
Visual Prompts
263(1)
Research Prompts
263(1)
Judging What You Have
264(1)
What's Promising Material and What Isn't?
264(1)
Questions About Audience and Purpose
265(1)
Questions of Form
265(1)
Research Considerations
266(1)
Writing the Sketch
266(1)
Student Sketch Amy Garrett, ``The Happy Cow''
266(2)
Moving from Sketch to Draft
268(1)
Evaluating Your Own Sketch
268(1)
Questions for Peer Review
268(1)
Writing with Computers
269(1)
Reflecting on What You've Learned
270(1)
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
270(1)
Composing the Draft
271(1)
Methods of Development
272(1)
Using Evidence
273(1)
Inquiring into the Details Evidence--A Case Study
274(1)
Workshopping the Draft
274(1)
Reflecting on the Draft
274(1)
Questions for Readers
275(1)
Revising the Draft
275(1)
Polishing the Draft
276(1)
Student Essay Amy Garrett, ``The Happy Cow: A Deceptively Vegetarian Restuarant''
277(4)
Evaluating the Essay
281(1)
Using What You Have Learned
281(2)
Writing an Argument
283(46)
Writing to Persuade People
283(5)
Getting into Arguments
284(1)
Exercise 8.1 What Does It Mean to Argue?
285(1)
Making Claims
286(1)
Two Sides to Every Argument?
287(1)
Motives for Writing an Argument
288(1)
The Argument and Academic Writing
289(1)
Features of the Form
290(13)
Argument Amitai Etzioni, ``Law and Order and the Wild, Wild Web''
292(3)
Inquiring into the Essay
295(1)
Inquiring into the Details Some Basic Argument Strategies
295(1)
Argument George F. Will, ``The `Growth Model' and the Growth of Illiteracy''
296(2)
Inquiring into the Essay
298(1)
Argument Doris Lessing, ``What We Think of America''
299(1)
Inquiring into the Essay
300(1)
Seeing the Form Guess.com Ad
301(2)
The Writing Process
303(24)
Thinking About Subjects
303(1)
Generating Ideas
304(1)
Listing Prompts
304(1)
Fastwriting Prompts
305(1)
One Student's Response Ben's Journal
305(1)
Visual Prompts
306(1)
Research Prompts
306(2)
Writing with Computers
308(1)
Judging What You Have Got
308(1)
What's Promising Material and What Isn't?
308(1)
Questions About Audience and Purpose
309(1)
Research Considerations
310(2)
Inquiring into the Details Thinking Globally, Acting Locally
312(1)
Narrowing the Question
312(1)
Writing the Sketch
313(1)
Student Sketch Ben Bloom, ``How to Really Rock the Vote''
313(1)
Moving from Sketch to Draft
314(1)
Evaluating Your Own Sketch
314(1)
Questions for Peer Review
315(1)
Reflecting on What You've Learned
316(1)
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
316(1)
Composing the Draft
317(1)
Methods of Development
317(2)
Inquiring into the Details What Evidence Can Do
319(1)
Using Evidence
320(1)
Workshopping the Draft
320(1)
Reflecting on the Draft
320(1)
Questions for Readers
321(1)
Inquiring into the Details Ten Common Logical Fallacies
321(2)
Revising the Draft
323(1)
Polishing the Draft
324(1)
Student Essay Kelly Sundberg, ``I Am Not a Savage''
325(2)
Evaluating the Essay
327(1)
Using What You Have Learned
327(2)
Writing a Critical Essay
329(60)
Writing About Literature
329(1)
Motives for Writing a Critical Essay
330(1)
The Critical Essay and Academic Writing
331(1)
Features of the Form
332(34)
Short Story Leslie Marmon Silko, ``Lullaby''
333(8)
Inquiring into the Story
341(1)
One Student's Response Noel's Journal
342(1)
Short Story Alice Walker, ``Everyday Use''
342(8)
Inquiring into the Story
350(1)
Critical Essay John Gruesser, ``Animal Imagery in `Everyday Use''
351(2)
Inquiring into the Essay
353(1)
Essay Scott Russell Sanders, ``The Inheritance of Tools''
354(7)
Inquiring into the Details How to Read Nonfiction
361(1)
Inquiring into the Essay
361(1)
Seeing the Form Christina's World by Andrew Wyeth
362(1)
Exercise 9.1 Painting as Literature
363(3)
The Writing Process
366(20)
Thinking About Subjects
366(1)
Generating Ideas
367(1)
Listing Prompts
367(1)
Fastwriting Prompts
368(1)
Visual Prompts
368(1)
Research Prompts
369(1)
Inquiring into the Details Common Literary Devices
369(2)
Judging What You Have
371(1)
What's Promising Material and What Isn't?
371(1)
Questions About Audience and Purpose
372(2)
Writing a Sketch
374(1)
Student Sketch Julie Bird, ``What Is the Role of Nature in `Lullaby'?''
374(1)
Moving from Sketch to Draft
375(1)
Evaluating Your Own Sketch
375(1)
Questions for Peer Review
376(1)
Reflecting on What You've Learned
376(1)
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
376(2)
Writing with Computers
378(1)
Composing the Draft
378(1)
Methods of Development
379(1)
Using Evidence
380(1)
Workshopping the Draft
380(1)
Reflecting on the Draft
380(1)
Questions for Readers
380(1)
Revising the Draft
381(1)
Polishing the Draft
381(2)
Student Essay Julie Bird, ``Nature as Being: Landscape in Silko's `Lullaby'''
383(2)
Evaluating the Essay
385(1)
Using What You Have Learned
386(3)
Writing an Ethnographic Essay
389(50)
Writing About Culture
389(1)
Motives for Writing Ethnography
390(1)
Ethnography and Academic Writing
391(1)
Features of the Form
392(17)
Ethnographic Essay Rachel Simmons, ``Intimate Enemies''
393(5)
Inquiring into the Essay
398(1)
Ethnographic Essay Patricia Leigh Brown, ``For the Muslim Prom Queen, There Are No Kings Allowed''
399(4)
Inquiring into the Essay
403(1)
Ethnographic Essay Nik Cohn, Excerpt from `Soljas'
404(2)
Inquiring into the Essay
406(1)
Seeing The Form Mrs. Smith's Kitchen Table and Vanity the Day After She Died
407(2)
The Writing Process
409(26)
Thinking About Subjects
409(1)
Writing with Computers
410(1)
Generating Ideas
410(1)
Listing Prompts
410(2)
Fastwriting Prompts
412(1)
Visual Prompts
412(1)
Research Prompts
413(1)
Judging What You Have
413(1)
What's Promising Material and What Isn't?
413(1)
Questions About Audience and Purpose
414(1)
Inquiring into the Details Questions Ethnographers Ask
415(1)
Research Considerations
416(1)
Field Notes Rita Guerra, ``Field Notes on Friday Afternoon at Emerald Lanes''
417(2)
Writing the Sketch
419(2)
Moving from Sketch to Draft
421(1)
Evaluating Your Own Sketch
421(1)
Questions for Peer Review
421(1)
Reflecting on What You've Learned
421(1)
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
422(1)
Inquiring into the Details Useful Library Databases for Ethnography
423(1)
Composing the Draft
423(1)
Methods of Development
424(1)
Using Evidence
425(1)
Workshopping the Draft
425(1)
Reflecting on the Draft
426(1)
Questions for Readers
426(1)
Revising the Draft
426(1)
Polishing the Draft
427(1)
Student Essay Jeremy Johnson, ``I See Me as You See Me: An Ethnography of West Junior High''
428(6)
Evaluating the Essay
434(1)
Using What You Have Learned
435(4)
Part Three INQUIRING DEEPER
Writing a Research Essay
439(68)
Writing with Research
439(2)
Motives for Writing a Research Essay
441(1)
Exercise 11.1 An Atheist Goes to Church
441(1)
The Research Essay and Academic Writing
442(1)
Features of the Form
443(33)
Research Essay Clifford Bishop, ``Marriage Customs and Ceremonies''
444(3)
Inquiring into the Essay
447(1)
Research Essay Ann Braley-Smith, ``Killing Bad Guys''
447(7)
Inquiring into the Essay
454(1)
Research Essay Cullen Murphy, ``Out of the Ordinary''
455(4)
Inquiring into the Essay
459(1)
Academic Research Essay Amy Janan Johnson, ``Examining the Maintenance of Friendships''
459(1)
Inquiring into the Details Reading Academic Research Essays
460(14)
Inquiring into the Essay
474(1)
Seeing the Form Idaho State Penitentiary, Women's Prison
475(1)
The Writing Process
476(29)
Thinking About Subjects
477(1)
Generating Ideas
478(1)
Listing Prompts
478(1)
Fastwriting Prompts
478(1)
One Student's Response Julian's journal
479(1)
Visual Prompts
479(1)
Research Prompts
479(2)
Judging What You Have
481(1)
What's Promising Material and What Isn't?
481(1)
Is It a Researchable Question?
481(1)
Questions About Audience and Purpose
482(1)
Inquiring into the Details Finding the Focusing Question
483(1)
One Student's Response Julian's Journal
484(1)
Writing the Sketch
484(1)
Student Sketch Amy Garrett, ``Why Do People Tan?''
485(2)
Moving from Sketch to Draft
487(1)
Evaluating Your Own Sketch
487(1)
Questions for Peer Review
487(1)
Reflecting on What You've Learned
488(1)
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
488(1)
Composing the Draft
489(1)
Methods of Development
490(1)
Using Evidence
491(1)
Workshopping the Draft
491(1)
Reflecting on the Draft
492(1)
Writing with Computers
493
Questions for Readers
492(2)
Revising the Draft
494(1)
Polishing the Draft
494(1)
Student Essay Amy Garrett, ``We Need the Sun''
495(10)
Evaluating the Essay
505(1)
Using What You Have Learned
505(2)
Research Techniques
507(42)
Methods of Collecting
507(1)
Research in the Electronic Age
508(8)
Magic Words That Open Doors
509(1)
How Librarians Organize Books
510(2)
Library of Congress Subject Headings
512(1)
Google Your Boole
513(3)
Developing Working Knowledge
516(8)
Searching Key Library References
517(3)
Inquiring into the Details Methods of Recording Information
520(1)
Conducting Subject Surveys on the Web
521(2)
Inquiring into the Details The Working Bibliography
523(1)
Evaluating Library Sources
524(1)
Evaluating Web Sources
525(4)
Developing Deep Knowledge
529(8)
Finding Books
529(1)
Inquiring into the Details How to Annotate a Book
530(1)
Finding Periodicals
530(1)
Finding Newspapers
531(1)
Finding Sources on the Web
531(1)
Writing in the Middle: Synthesizing Source Information and Your Own Ideas
532(1)
Writing with Computers
533(1)
Double-Entry journal
534(1)
Research Log
534(1)
One Student's Response Claude's Research Log
535(2)
Interviews
537(4)
Arranging Interviews
537(1)
Making Contact
538(1)
Conducting the Interview
539(1)
Using the Interview in Your Writing
540(1)
Surveys
541(4)
Defining a Survey's Goals and Audience
542(1)
Types of Survey Questions
542(1)
Crafting Survey Questions
543(1)
Conducting a Survey
544(1)
Using Survey Results in Your Writing
544(1)
Knowing When to Stop
545(1)
Using What You Have Learned
546(3)
Using and Citing Sources
549(68)
Controlling Information
549(1)
Using Sources
550(5)
Summarizing
551(1)
Paraphrasing
552(1)
Quoting
553(2)
Citing Sources
555(4)
Writing with Computers
556(1)
Avoiding Plagiarism
556(2)
Exercise 13.1 The Accidental Plagiarist
558(1)
MLA Documentation Guidelines
559(34)
Inquiring into the Details The Common Knowledge Exception
560(1)
Citing Sources
560(1)
Where to Put Citations
561(1)
Inquiring into the Details Citations That Go with the Flow
562(1)
When You Mention the Author's Name
563(1)
When There Is No Author
563(1)
Works by the Same Author
564(1)
When One Source Quotes Another
564(1)
Personal Interviews
564(1)
Several Sources in a Single Citation
565(2)
Format
567(1)
The Layout
567(3)
Preparing the ``Works Cited'' Page
570
Format
567(5)
Citing Books
572(1)
Sample Book Citations
573(4)
Citing Periodicals
577(4)
Citing Nonprint and Other Sources
581(3)
Citing ``Portable'' Databases
584(1)
Citing Online Databases
585(8)
A Sample Paper in the MLA Style
593(1)
APA Documentation Guidelines
593(20)
Inquiring into the Details Recent APA Style Changes
594(1)
How the Essay Should Look
594(5)
Citing Sources in Your Essay
599(2)
Preparing the ``References'' List
601(2)
Sample References
603(6)
Citing Electronic Resources
609(4)
A Sample Paper in the APA Style
613(1)
Using What You Have Learned
613(4)
Part Four REINQUIRING
Revision Strategies
617(52)
Reseeing Your Topic
617(1)
Divorcing the Draft
618(1)
Strategies for Divorcing the Draft
619(1)
Photography as a Metaphor for Revision
620(5)
Looking Beyond the First Picture
621(1)
The Pepper is More Than A Pepper
622(2)
One Student's Response Amy's Photographic Revision
624(1)
Rhetorical Review
625(6)
A Case Study in Revision ``Jon's Horse Race of Meaning''
626(3)
Student Essay Jon Butterfield, ``Blue Spirals''
629(2)
Evaluating the Essay
631(1)
Five Categories of Revision
631(2)
Writing with Computers
632(1)
Writing with Computers Problems of Purpose
633(6)
Revision Strategy 14.1: What's Your Primary Motive?
635(1)
Revision Strategy 14.2: What Do You Want to Know About What You Learned?
636(1)
One Student's Response Julia's Draft
636(1)
Revision Strategy 14.3: Finding the Focusing Question
637(1)
Revision Strategy 14.4: What's the Relationship?
638(1)
Problems with Meaning
639(7)
Implicit or Explicit Meaning
639(1)
Looking Beyond the Obvious
640(1)
Methods for Discovering Your Thesis
641(1)
Revision Strategy 14.5: Find the ``Instructive Line''
641(1)
Revision Strategy 14.6: Looping Toward a Thesis
642(1)
Revision Strategy 14.7: Reclaiming Your Topic
643(1)
Revision Strategy 14.8: Believing and Doubting
644(1)
Methods for Refining Your Thesis
645(1)
Revision Strategy 14.9: Questions as Knives
645(1)
Problems with Information
646(4)
Revision Strategy 14.10: Explode a Moment
647(1)
Revision Strategy 14.11: Beyond Examples
648(1)
Revision Strategy 14.12: Research
649(1)
Problems with Structure
650(6)
Formal Academic Structures
650(1)
Revision Strategy 14.13: Reorganizing Around Thesis and Support
650(2)
Revision Strategy 14.14: Multiple Leads
652(1)
Inquiring into the Details Types of Leads
653(1)
Revision Strategy 14.15: The Frankenstein Draft
654(1)
Revision Strategy 14.16: Make an Outline
655(1)
Problems of Clarity and Style
656(9)
Solving Problems of Clarity
657(1)
Revision Strategy 14.17: Untangling Paragraphs
657(2)
Inquiring into the Details Transition Flags
659(1)
Revision Strategy 14.18: Cutting Clutter
659(2)
Revision Strategy 14.19: The Actor and the Action Next Door
661(1)
Improving Style
662(1)
Revision Strategy 14.20: Actors and Actions
662(2)
Revision Strategy 14.21: Smoothing the Choppiness
664(1)
Revision Strategy 14.22: Fresh Ways to Say Things
665(1)
Using What You Have Learned
665(4)
The Writer's Workshop
669
Making the Most of Peer Review
669(4)
Being Read
669(1)
Exercise 15.1 Workshopaphobia
670(1)
Divorcing the Draft
671(1)
Instructive Talk
671(2)
Models for Writing Workshops
673(2)
Full-Class Workshops
673(1)
Small-Group Workshops
674(1)
One-on-One Peer Review
674(1)
The Writer's Responsibilities
675(1)
Writing with Computers
676(1)
The Reader's Responsibilities
676(2)
Inquiring into the Details Finding a Role
677(1)
What Can Go Wrong and What to Do About It
678(3)
Exercise 15.2 Group Problem Solving
680(1)
One's Student's Response Amy's Perspective on Workshops
680(1)
Methods of Responding
681(10)
Experiential and Directive Responses
681(1)
Response Formats
682(1)
The No-Response Workshop
682(1)
The Initial Response Workshop
682(1)
The Narrative of Thought Workshop
683(1)
The Instructive Lines Workshop
684(1)
The Purpose Workshop
685(1)
The Graphing Reader Interest Workshop
686(1)
The Sum-of-the-Parts Workshop
687(1)
The Thesis Workshop
688(1)
The Editing Workshop
689(1)
Reflecting on the Workshop
690(1)
Using What You Have Learned
691
HandBook
1(1)
Sentence Boundaries
3(9)
Fragments
3(5)
Comma Splices
8(2)
Fused Sentences
10(2)
Sentence Inconsistencies
12(5)
Parallelism
12(2)
Coordination and Subordination
14(1)
Mixed Sentences
15(1)
Shifts
16(1)
Problems with Modification
17(4)
Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers
17(2)
Restrictive and Nonrestrictive Modifiers
19(1)
Adjectives and Adverbs
20(1)
Verbs
21(6)
Tense
22(1)
Voice
23(1)
Mood
24(1)
Subject-Verb Agreement
25(2)
Pronouns
27(6)
Pronoun Case
27(2)
Pronoun Reference
29(1)
Pronoun Agreement
30(2)
Relative Pronouns
32(1)
Style
33(4)
Conciseness
33(1)
Appropriate Language
34(3)
Punctuation
37(10)
End Punctuation
39(1)
Semicolon
40(1)
Comma
40(4)
Colon
44(1)
Dash
44(1)
Quotation Marks
45(1)
Other Marks
46(1)
Mechanics and Spelling
47(10)
Capitalization
48(1)
Abbreviation
49(1)
Apostrophe
50(1)
Italics
51(1)
Hyphens
52(1)
Numbers
53(1)
Spelling
54(3)
Review of Basic Grammar
57(21)
Parts of Speech
57(13)
Subjects and Predicates
70(1)
Objects and Complements
71(2)
Phrases
73(2)
Clauses
75(1)
Basic Sentence Patterns
76(1)
Types of Sentences
76(2)
Tips for ESL Writers
78
Articles
78(1)
Verbs
79(5)
Adjectives and Adverbs
84(2)
Prepositions
86(1)
Participles
86
Appendix A The Writing Portfolio
1(1)
What Is a Portfolio?
1(1)
Types of Portfolios
2(2)
Unevaluated Portfolios
2(1)
Evaluated Portfolio
3(1)
Why Require a Portfolio
4(1)
Organizing Portfolios
5(1)
What to Include
6(4)
Conisder Your Audience
9(1)
Consider Your Purpose
9(1)
Self-Presentation
10(1)
Writing a Reflective Letter or Essay
11(2)
Final Preparation
13
Appendix B The Literature Review
1(1)
What Is a Literature Review
1(2)
When to Write the Literature Review
3(1)
How to Write the Literature Review
4
Gathering Materials
4(1)
Reading Strategies
4(2)
Organizing
6(1)
Drafting
7
Appendix C The Annotated Bibliography
1(1)
What Is an Annotated Bibliography
1(2)
When to Write an Annotated Bibliography
3(1)
How to Write an Annotated Bibliography
3(2)
Gathering Materials
3(1)
Reading Strategies
4(1)
Writing the Annotated Bibliography
5(1)
Sample Student Annotated Bibliographies
5
Appendix D The Essay Exam
1(1)
How to Write Essay Exams
3
Gathering Materials
3(1)
Reading Strategies
4(1)
Anticipating the Exam
5(1)
Analyzing Essay Questions
6(3)
Planning and Drafting
9
Credits 1(1)
Index 1


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