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Curious Writer, The: Concise Edition,9780205620241

Curious Writer, The: Concise Edition

by
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780205620241

ISBN10:
0205620248
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2009
Publisher(s):
Longman
List Price: $64.40

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Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 1/1/2009.
What is included with this book?
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to inclue any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.

Summary

The Curious Writerby Bruce Ballenger is an assignment-oriented, all-in-one rhetoric-reader-handbook that stresses the connections between personal and academic writing. The Curious Writer emphasizes research as a key part of the writing process, encourages revision throughout the writing assignment chapters, and places strong emphasis on critical reading skills. Topics include research, writing process, and revision process. Both student and professional readings are included, up-to-date coverage of computers and the Internet includes tips on using the Internet as a research tool. General interest; improving writing skills.

Table of Contents

Preface
Writing As Inquiry
Motives for Writing
Beliefs About Writing
What Do You Believe?
One Student's Response: Jon's Journal
Inquiring into the Details: Journals
Unlearning Unhelpful Beliefs
The Beliefs of This Book
Inquiring into the Details: Portfolios
Writing Situations and Rhetorical Choices
Habits of Mind
Start with Questions, Not Answers
Suspend Judgment
Search for Surprise
A Roomful of Details
One Student's Response: Margaret's Journal
Inquiring into the Details: Invention Strategies
Writing as a Process
Recognizing the Challenges
What Is Your Process?
Thinking About Your Process
Linear versus Recursive Models
Dialectical Thinking
Practicing Dialectical Thinking
One Student's Response: Jon's Journal
Writing with Computers: Knowing When to Step away from the Computer
Overcome Your Own Challenges
Using What You Have Learned
Reading As Inquiry
Motives for Reading
Beliefs About Reading
What Do You Believe?
Reading Situations and Rhetorical Choices
Reading as a Process
Linear versus Recursive Models
Reading Strategies
Reading: Henry David Thoreau, Excerpt from Walden
Inquiring into the Details: Reading Perspectives
Dialectical Thinking
Writing with Computers: Reflection and Dialectical Thinking on a Computer
Believing and Doubting
Practicing Dialectical Thinking
Reading: Bruce Ballenger, "The Importance of Writing Badly"
One Student's Response: Todd's Journal
Inquiring into the Details: The Double-Entry Journal
Adapting to Unfamiliar Reading Situations
Further Practice: Untangling Academic Prose
Reading: David W. Noble, excerpt from The Forces of Production: A Social History of Industrial Automation
Inquiring into the Details: Encountering Unfamiliar Genres
"Reading" The Visual
Learning the Grammar of Images
Some Strategies for Reading Images
Reading Images
The "Look" of Writing
Using What You Have Learned
Ways Of Inquiring
Opening Questions for Inquiry
Exploration
Explanation
Evaluation
Reflection
Practicing Inquiry
Reading: Bruce Ballenger, "How Much Should We Care What Happens to Animals"
Exploring Within and Without
Reading: Frank Bruni, excerpt from "It Died for Us"
One Student's Response: Daniel's Journal
Explaining to Yourself, Explaining to Others
One Student's Response: Daniel's Journal
Evaluating the Arguments
One Student's Response: Daniel's Journal
Exercise 3.4 Reflecting on the Process
One Student's Response: Daniel's Journal
Symphonic Inquiry
Using What You Have Learned
Writing A Personal Essay
Writing About Experience
Motives for Writing a Personal Essay
Personal Essays and Academic Writing
Features of the Form
Personal Essay: Naomi Shibab Nye, "Long Overdue" Inquiring into the Essay
Personal Essay: Judith Ortiz Cofer, "One More Lesson"
Inquiring into the Essay
Seeing the Form: Self Portrait by Frances Benjamin Johnston
The Writing Process
Thinking About Subjects
Generating Ideas
One Student's Response: Margaret's Journal
Inquiring into the Details: Clustering or Mapping
Judging What You Have
Writing the Sketch
Writing with Computers: Cutting versus Deleting
Student Sketch: Lana Kuchta, "The Way I Remember"
Moving from Sketch to Draft
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
Composing the Draft
Workshopping the Draft
Revising the Draft
Polishing the Draft
Student Essay: Julia C. Arredondo, "Beet Field Dreams"
Evaluating the Essay
Using What You Have Learned
Writing A Review
Writing That Evaluates
Motives for Writing a Review
The Review and Academic Writing
Features of the Form
Review: Lester Bangs, "Review of Peter Guralnick's Lost Highways"
Inquiring into the Essay
Review: Ann Hodgman, "No Wonder They Call Me a Bitch"
Inquiring into the Essay
Seeing the Form: Choosing the Best Picture
The Writing Process
Thinking About Subjects
Generating Ideas
Writing with Computers: Spelling, Grammar, and Style Checkers
Judging What You Have
From Jury to Judgment One Student's Response: Christy's Journal
Writing the Sketch
Student Sketch: Christy Claymore, "Casablanca: Even As Time Goes By"
Moving from Sketch to Draft
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
Composing the Draft
Workshopping the Draft
One Student's Response: Christy's Journal
Revising the Draft
Polishing the Draft
Student Essay: Christy Claymore, "Casablanca Endures: Even As Time Goes By"
Evaluating the Essay
Using What You Have Learned
Writing A Proposal
Writing About Problems and Solutions
Problems of Consequence
Problems of Scale
Motives for Writing Proposals
The Proposal and Academic Writing
Features of the Form
Proposal: Barrett Seaman, "How Binging Became the New College Sport"
Inquiring into the Essay
Proposal: Michael Arad and Peter Walker, "Reflecting Absence"
Inquiring into the Essay
Proposal: Julie Ann Homutoff, "A Research Proposal: Effect of Infant's Perceived Gender?"
Inquiring into the Essay
Seeing the Form: The Faces of Meth Use
The Writing Process
Thinking About Subjects
Generating Ideas
One Student's Response: Caesar's Journal
One Student's Response: Gina's Journal
Judging What You Have
Inquiring into the Details: Writing a Research Proposal
Writing the Sketch
Student Sketch: Gina Sinisi, "Clothing Optional"
Moving from Sketch to Draft
One Student's Response: Gina's Journal
Writing with Computers: Tracking Changes to a Draft
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
Composing the Draft
Inquiring into the Details: Evidence-A Case Study
Workshopping the Draft
Revising the Draft
Polishing the Draft
Student Essay: Gina Sinisi, "Clothing Optional"
Evaluating the Essay
Using What You Have Learned
Writing An Argument
Writing to Persuade People
Getting into Arguments
Arguments and Inquiry
Making Claims
Two Sides to Every Argument?
Motives for Writing an Argument
The Argument and Academic Writing
Features of the Form
Argument: Alice Goodman, "Getting Real in the Classroom"
Inquiring into the Essay
Inquiring into the Details: Some Basic Argument Strategies
Argument: George F. Will, "The 'Growth Model' and the Growth of Illiteracy"
Inquiring into the Essay
Argument: Erin Aubry Kaplan, "Still Trying to Kick the Kink"
Inquiring into the Essay
Seeing the Form: The "Imagetext" As Argument
The Writing Process
Thinking About Subjects
Generating Ideas
One Student's Response: Ben's Journal
Writing with Computers: Arguments on the Internet
Judging What You Have Got
Writing the Sketch
Student Sketch: Ben Bloom, "How to Really Rock the Vote"
Moving from Sketch to Draft
Inquiring into the Details: Ethos, Pathos, and Logos and the Rhetorical Situation
Inquiring into the Details: Using Toulmin to Analyze Arguments
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
Composing the Draft
Inquiring into the Details: What Evidence Can Do
Workshopping the Draft
Inquiring into the Details: Ten Common Logical Fallacies
Revising the Draft
Polishing the Draft
Student Essay: Kelly Sundberg, "I Am Not a Savage"
Evaluating the Essay
Using What You Have Learned
Writing A Critical Essay
Writing About Literature
Motives for Writing a Critical Essay
The Critical Essay and Academic Writing
Features of the Form
Short Story: Leslie Marmon Silko, "Lullaby"
Inquiring into the Story
One Student's Response: Noel's Journal
Short Story: Joyce Carol Oates, "Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?"
Inquiring into the Story
Critical Essay: Alice Hall Petry, "Who Is Ellie? Oates' 'Where Are Where Are You Going, Where Have You Been?'"
Inquiring into the Essay
Seeing the Form: Christina's World by Andrew Wyeth
The Writing Process
Thinking About Subjects
Generating Ideas
Inquiring into the Details: Common Literary Devices
Judging What You Have
Writing a Sketch
Student Sketch: Julie Bird, "What Is the Role of Nature in 'Lullaby'?"
Moving from Sketch to Draft
Research and Other Strategies: Gathering More Information
Composing the Draft
Workshopping the Draft
Revising the Draft
Polishing the Draft
Student Essay: Julie Bird, "Nature as Being: Landscape in Silko's 'Lullaby'"
Evaluating the Essay
Using What You Have Learned
Research Techniques
Methods of Collecting
Research in the Electronic Age
Magic Words That Open Doors
How Librarians Organize Books
Library of Congress Subject Headings
Google Your Boole
Writing with Computers: Researching Online
Developing Working Knowledge
Searching Key Library References
Inquiring into the Details: Methods of Recording Information
Conducting Subject Surveys on the Web
Inquiring into the Details: The Working Bibliography
Evaluating Library Sources
Evaluating Web Sources
Developing Focused Knowledge
Finding Books
Inquiring into the Details: How to Annotate a Book
Finding Periodicals
Finding Newspapers
Finding Sources on the Web
Writing in the Middle: Synthesizing Source Information and Your Own Ideas
Writing with Computers: Plagiarism and the Internet
One Student's Response: Claude's Research Log
Interviews
Arranging Interviews
Making Contact
Conducting the Interview
Using the Interview in Your Writing
Surveys
Defining a Survey's Goals and Audience
Types of Survey Questions
Inquiring into the Details: Types of Survey Questions
Crafting Survey Questions
Conducting a Survey
Using Survey Results in Your Writing
Knowing When to Stop
Using What You Have Learned
Using And Citing Sources
Controlling Information
Using Sources
Summarizing
Paraphrasing
Quoting
Citing Sources
Avoiding Plagiarism
The Accidental Plagiarist
MLA Documentation Guidelines
Inquiring into the Details: The Common Knowledge Exception
Citing Sources
Inquiring into the Details: Citations That Go with the Flow
Writing with Computers: Formatting in the MLA Style
Format
Preparing the "Works Cited" Page
A Sample Paper in the MLA Style
Student Essay: Amy Garrett, "We Need the Sun"
APA Documentation Guidelines
Inquiring into the Details: Recent APA Style Changes
How the Essay Should Look
Citing Sources in Your Essay
Preparing the "References" List
A Sample Paper in the APA Style
Using What You Have Learned
Revision Strategies
Reseeing Your Topic
Divorcing the Draft
Writing with Computers: When your Computer Makes it Hard to Divorce a Draft
Strategies for Divorcing the Draft
Five Categories of Revision
Problems of Purpose
What's Your Primary Motive?
What Do You Want to Know About What You Learned?
One Student's Response: Julia's Draft
Finding the Focusing Question
What's the Relationship?
Problems with Meaning
Implicit or Explicit Meaning
Looking Beyond the Obvious
Methods for Discovering Your Thesis
Find the "Instructive Line"
Looping Toward a Thesis
Reclaiming Your Topic
Believing and Doubting
Methods for Refining Your Thesis
Questions as Knives
Qualifying Your Claims
Problems with Information
Explode a Moment
Beyond Examples
Research
Backing up Your Assumptions
Problems with Structure
Formal Academic Structures
Reorganizing Around Thesis and Support
Multiple Leads
Inquiring into the Details: Types of Leads
The Frankenstein Draft
Make a PowerPoint Outline
Problems of Clarity and Style
Solving Problems of Clarity
Untangling Paragraphs
Inquiring into the Details: Transition Flags
Cutting Clutter
The Actor and the Action Next Door
Improving Style
Actors and Actions
Smoothing the Choppiness
Fresh Ways to Say Things
Using What You Have Learned
Index
Table of Contents provided by Publisher. All Rights Reserved.


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