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Data and Computer Communications,9780131006812
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Data and Computer Communications

by
Edition:
8th
ISBN13:

9780131006812

ISBN10:
0131006819
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2007
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall

Questions About This Book?

What version or edition is this?
This is the 8th edition with a publication date of 1/1/2007.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.

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Summary

This timely revision of an all-time best-seller in the field features the clarity and scope of a Stallings classic. This comprehensive volume provides the most up-to-date coverage of the essential topics in data communications, networking, Internet technology and protocols, and standards - all in a convenient modular format. Features updated coverage of multimedia, Gigabit and 10 Gbps Ethernet, WiFi/IEEE 802.11 wireless LANs, security, and much more. Ideal for professional reference or self-study. For Product Development personnel, Programmers, Systems Engineers, Network Designers and others involved in the design of data communications and networking products.

Table of Contents

Preface xiii
Reader's Guide
1(6)
Outline of the Book
2(1)
Internet and Web Resources
2(2)
Standards
4(3)
PART ONE OVERVIEW
7(44)
Data Communications and Networking Overview
9(10)
A Communications Model
10(3)
Data Communications
13(1)
Data Communication Networking
14(3)
An Example Configuration
17(2)
Protocol Architecture
19(32)
The Need for a Protocol Architecture
20(1)
A Simple Protocol Architecture
21(6)
OSI
27(11)
The TCP/IP Protocol Architecture
38(6)
Recommended Reading and Web Site
44(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
45(6)
Appendix 2A The Trivial File Transfer Protocol
47(4)
PART TWO DATA COMMUNICATIONS
51(244)
Data Transmission
55(38)
Concepts and Terminology
57(11)
Analog and Digital Data Transmission
68(8)
Transmission Impairments
76(5)
Channel Capacity
81(6)
Recommended Reading
87(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
87(6)
Appendix 3A Decibels and Signal Strength
90(3)
Guided and Wireless Transmission
93(36)
Guided Transmission Media
95(12)
Wireless Transmission
107(8)
Wireless Propagation
115(4)
Line-of-Sight Transmission
119(5)
Recommended Reading and Web Sites
124(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
125(4)
Signal Encoding Techniques
129(42)
Digital Data, Digital Signals
131(11)
Digital Data, Analog Signals
142(10)
Analog Data, Digital Signals
152(7)
Analog Data, Analog Signals
159(6)
Recommended Reading
165(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
166(5)
Digital Data Communication Techniques
171(36)
Asynchronous and Synchronous Transmission
173(3)
Types of Errors
176(1)
Error Detection
177(8)
Error Correction
185(6)
Line Configurations
191(2)
Interfacing
193(10)
Recommended Reading
203(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
204(3)
Data Link Control
207(34)
Flow Control
209(6)
Error Control
215(6)
High-Level Data Link Control (HDLC)
221(7)
Recommended Reading
228(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
229(12)
Appendix 7A Performance Issues
232(9)
Multiplexing
241(34)
Frequency Division Multiplexing
243(7)
Synchronous Time Division Multiplexing
250(10)
Statistical Time Division Multiplexing
260(7)
Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line
267(3)
xDSL
270(2)
Recommended Reading and Web Sites
272(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
272(3)
Spread Spectrum
275(20)
The Concept of Spread Spectrum
276(1)
Frequency-Hopping Spread Spectrum
277(5)
Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum
282(5)
Code-Division Multiple Access
287(4)
Recommended Reading
291(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
291(4)
PART THREE WIDE AREA NETWORKS
295(168)
Circuit Switching and Packet Switching
297(40)
Switching Networks
299(1)
Circuit-Switching Networks
300(4)
Circuit-Switching Concepts
304(3)
Control Signaling
307(9)
Softswitch Architecture
316(2)
Packet-Switching Principles
318(8)
X.25
326(2)
Frame Relay
328(5)
Recommended Reading and Web Sites
333(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
334(3)
Asynchronous Transfer Mode
337(30)
Protocol Architecture
338(1)
ATM Logical Connections
339(5)
ATM Cells
344(6)
Transmission of ATM Cells
350(3)
ATM Service Categories
353(4)
ATM Adaptation Layer
357(7)
Recommended Reading and Web Sites
364(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
364(3)
Routing in Switched Networks
367(28)
Routing in Circuit-Switching Networks
368(2)
Routing in Packet-Switching Networks
370(15)
Least-Cost Algorithms
385(5)
Recommended Reading
390(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
390(5)
Congestion Control in Switched Data Networks
395(36)
Effects of Congestion
397(4)
Congestion Control
401(3)
Traffic Management
404(2)
Congestion Control in Packet-Switching Networks
406(1)
Frame Relay Congestion Control
406(6)
ATM Traffic Management
412(13)
ATM-GFR Traffic Management
425(2)
Recommended Reading
427(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
428(3)
Cellular Wireless Networks
431(32)
Principles of Cellular Networks
432(13)
First-Generation Analog
445(2)
Second-Generation CDMA
447(8)
Third-Generation Systems
455(4)
Recommended Reading and Web Sites
459(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
460(3)
PART FOUR LOCAL AREA NETWORKS
463(106)
Local Area Network Overview
465(34)
Background
466(4)
Topologies and Transmission Media
470(5)
LAN Protocol Architecture
475(8)
Bridges
483(7)
Layer 2 and Layer 3 Switches
490(6)
Recommended Reading and Web Site
496(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
496(3)
High-Speed LANs
499(44)
The Emergence of High-Speed LANs
500(2)
Ethernet
502(14)
Token Ring
516(4)
Fibre Channel
520(5)
Recommended Reading and Web Sites
525(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
526(17)
Appendix 16A Digital Signal Encoding for LANs
528(7)
Appendix 16B Performance Issues
535(8)
Wireless LANs
543(26)
Overview
544(5)
Wireless LAN Technology
549(4)
IEEE 802.11 Architecture and Services
553(5)
IEEE 802.11 Medium Access Control
558(7)
IEEE 802.11 Physical Layer
565(2)
Recommended Reading and Web Sites
567(1)
Key Terms and Review Questions
568(1)
PART FIVE COMMUNICATIONS ARCHITECTURE AND PROTOCOLS
569(220)
Internetwork Protocols
571(44)
Basic Protocol Functions
572(8)
Principles of Internetworking
580(4)
Connectionless Internetworking
584(8)
Internet Protocol
592(8)
IPv6
600(10)
Recommended Reading and Web Sites
610(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
611(4)
Internetwork Operation
615(48)
Multicasting
617(9)
Routing Protocols
626(11)
Integrated Services Architecture
637(11)
Differentiated Services
648(9)
Recommended Reading and Web Sites
657(2)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
659(4)
Transport Protocols
663(42)
Connection-Oriented Transport Protocol Mechanisms
664(19)
TCP
683(8)
TCP Congestion Control
691(9)
UDP
700(2)
Recommended Reading
702(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
702(3)
Network Security
705(40)
Security Requirements and Attacks
707(1)
Confidentiality with Symmetric Encryption
708(9)
Message Authentication and Hash Functions
717(7)
Public-Key Encryption and Digital Signatures
724(7)
Secure Socket Layer and Transport Layer Security
731(5)
IPv4 and IPv6 Security
736(5)
Recommended Reading and Web Sites
741(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
741(4)
Distributed Applications
745(44)
Electronic Mail---SMTP and MIME
746(16)
Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP)
762(13)
Network Management---SNMP
775(10)
Recommended Reading and Web Sites
785(1)
Key Terms, Review Questions, and Problems
786(3)
Appendix A RFCs Cited in This Book
789(8)
Appendix B Fourier Analysis
B.1 Fourier Series Representation of Periodic Signals
791(1)
B.2 Fourier Transform Representation of Aperiodic Signals
792(4)
B.3 Recommended Reading
796(1)
Appendix C Sockets Programming
797(2)
Appendix D Projects for Teaching Data and Computer Communications
799(4)
D.1 Simulation Projects
799(1)
D.2 Performance Modeling
800(1)
D.3 Research Projects
801(1)
D.4 Reading/Report Assignments
801(2)
Glossary 803(12)
References 815(8)
Index 823

Excerpts

OBJECTIVES This book attempts to provide a unified overview of the broad field of data and computer communications. The organization of the book reflects an attempt to break this massive subject into comprehensible parts and to build, piece by piece, a survey of the state of the art. The book emphasizes basic principles and topics of fundamental importance concerning the technology and architecture of this field and provides a detailed discussion of leading-edge topics. The following basic themes serve to unify the discussion: Principles:Although the scope of this book is broad, there are a number of basic principles that appear repeatedly as themes and that unify this field. Examples are multiplexing, flow control, and error control. The book highlights these principles and contrasts their application in specific areas of technology. Design approaches:The book examines alternative approaches to meeting specific communication requirements. Standards:Standards have come to assume an increasingly important, indeed dominant, role in this field. An understanding of the current status and future direction of technology requires a comprehensive discussion of the related standards. PLAN OF THE TEXT The book is divided into five parts: In addition, the book includes an extensive glossary, a list of frequently used acronyms, and a bibliography. Each chapter includes problems and suggestions for further reading. The book is intended for both an academic and a professional audience. For the professional interested in this field, the book serves as a basic reference volume and is suitable for self-study. As a textbook, it can be used for a one-semester or two-semester course. It covers the material in the Communication and Networking core course of the joint ACM/IEEE Computing Curricula 2001. The chapters and parts of the book are sufficiently modul to provide a great deal of flexibility in the design of courses. The following are suggestions for course design: Fundamentals of Data Communications:Parts One (overview) and Two (data communications) and Chapters 10 and 11 (circuit switching, packet switching, and ATM). Communications Networks:If the student has a basic background in data communications, then this course could cover Parts One (overview), Three (WAN), and Four (LAN). Computer Networks:If the student has a basic background in data communications, then this course could cover Part One (overview), Chapters 6 and 7 (data communication techniques and data link control), and Part Five (protocols). In addition, a more streamlined course that covers the entire book is possible by eliminating certain chapters that are not essential on a first reading. Chapters that could be optional are Chapters 3 (data transmission) and 4 (transmission media), if the student has a basic understanding of these topics; Chapter 8 (multiplexing); Chapter 9 (spread spectrum); Chapters 12 through 14 (routing, congestion control, cellular networks); Chapter 18 (internetworking); and Chapter 21 (network security). INTERNET SERVICES FOR INSTRUCTORS AND STUDENTS There is a Web site for this book that provides support for students and instructors. The site includes links to other relevant sites, transparency masters of figures in the book, and sign-up information for the book's Internet mailing list. The Web page is at WilliamStallings.com/DCC/DCC7e.html; see the section, "Web Site for Data and Computer Communications," preceding the Table of Contents, for more information. An Internet mailing list has been set up so that instructors using this book can exchange information, suggestions, and questions with each other and with the author. As soon as typos or other errors are discovered, an errata list for this book will be available at WilliamStalling


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