9780321385550

Designing with Web Standards

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780321385550

  • ISBN10:

    0321385551

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 1/1/2007
  • Publisher: Peachpit Press
  • View Upgraded Edition

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $59!
    Your order must be $59 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
  • eCampus.com Device Compatibility Matrix

    Click the device icon to install or view instructions

    Apple iOS | iPad, iPhone, iPod
    Android Devices | Android Tables & Phones OS 2.2 or higher | *Kindle Fire
    Windows 10 / 8 / 7 / Vista / XP
    Mac OS X | **iMac / Macbook
    Enjoy offline reading with these devices
    Apple Devices
    Android Devices
    Windows Devices
    Mac Devices
    iPad, iPhone, iPod
    Our reader is compatible
     
     
     
    Android 2.2 +
     
    Our reader is compatible
     
     
    Kindle Fire
     
    Our reader is compatible
     
     
    Windows
    10 / 8 / 7 / Vista / XP
     
     
    Our reader is compatible
     
    Mac
     
     
     
    Our reader is compatible
List Price: $49.99 Save up to $48.99
  • Rent Book $17.50
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    TERM
    PRICE
    DUE
    HURRY! ONLY 2 COPIES IN STOCK AT THIS PRICE

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The Used, Rental and eBook copies of this book are not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

The ultimate resource for standards-based Web design, updated and enhanced for current and future browsers.

Table of Contents

Introduction 1(10)
One Size Does Not Fit All
2(2)
Theory Versus Practice
3(1)
A Continuum, Not a Set of Inflexible Rules
4(2)
Show, Don't Sell
4(1)
Let Your Work Do the Selling for You
5(1)
Selling In-House
5(1)
The Smell of Change
6(5)
Part I Houston, We Have a Problem
Before You Begin
11(132)
Spiraling Costs, Diminishing Returns
12(2)
Ending the Cycle of Obsolescence
14(1)
What Is Forward Compatibility?
15(1)
No Rules, No Dogma
16(2)
Practice, Not Theory
18(2)
Is This Trip Really Necessary?
20(1)
1 99.9% of Websites Are Still Obsolete
21(22)
Modern Browsers and Web Standards
22(3)
New Code for a New Job
24(1)
The "Version" Problem
25(2)
Backward Thinking
27(12)
Outdated Markup: The Cost to Site Owners
31(2)
Backward Compatibility
33(1)
Blocking Users Is Bad for Business
33(5)
The Road to Stupidville
38(1)
When Good Things Happen to Bad Markup
39(2)
The Cure
41(2)
2 Designing and Building with Standards
43(30)
Jumping Through Hoops
45(1)
The Cost of Design Before Standards
46(1)
Modern Site, Ancient Ways
47(4)
The Tragic Kingdom
51(2)
The Trinity of Web Standards
53(4)
Structure
53(3)
Presentation
56(1)
Behavior
57(1)
Into Action
57(1)
Benefits of Transitional Methods
58(2)
The Web Standards Project: Portability in Action
60(3)
One Document Serves All
63(1)
A List Apart: One Page, Many Views
63(4)
Design Beyond the Screen
65(1)
Time and Cost Savings, Increased Reach
66(1)
Where We Go from Here
67(6)
Transitional Forward Compatibility (Hybrid Design)
67(2)
Strict Forward Compatibility
69(4)
3 The Trouble with Standards
73(28)
Lovely to Look At, Repulsive to Code
74(4)
Common Goals, Common Means
76(1)
Perception Versus Reality
77(1)
2000: The Year That Browsers Came of Age
78(5)
IE5/Mac: Switching and Zooming
79(3)
Netscape's Bold Move
82(1)
The Floodgates Open
82(1)
Too Little, Too Late?
83(1)
CSS: The First Bag Is Free
84(1)
Bad Browsers Lead to Bad Practices
84(5)
The Curse of Legacy Rendering
85(1)
Inherit the Wind
86(1)
Miss Behavior to You
87(1)
Standardized Scripting at Long Last
88(1)
Confusing Sites, Bewildering Labels
89(3)
Academics Versus Economics
90(1)
Consortia Suggest, Companies Sell
91(1)
Product Awareness Versus Standards Awareness
91(1)
The F Word
92(5)
The Value of Flash
94(2)
The Trouble with Flash
96(1)
The Other Trouble with Flash
96(1)
Compliance Is a Dirty Word
97(4)
The Power of Language to Shape Perceptions
97(1)
The Inspiration Problem
98(1)
Other Problems
99(2)
4 Findability, Syndication, Blogs, Podcasts, the Long Tail, Ajax (and Other Reasons Standards Are Winning)
101(42)
The Universal Language (XML)
103(13)
XML and HTML Compared
104(1)
One Parent, Many Children
105(1)
An Essential Ingredient of Professional and Consumer Software
105(1)
More Popular Than a White Rapper
106(2)
Builds Strong Data Five Ways
108(1)
A Mother Lode of Inventions
109(4)
Web Publishing Tools for the Rest of Us
113(1)
At Your Service(s)
114(2)
XML Applications and Your Site
116(1)
Compatible by Nature
116(1)
A New Era of Cooperation
117
Test Suites and Specifications
117(1)
How Suite It Is
118(1)
WHAT Working Group
119(1)
Internet Explorer 7 and The Web Standards Project
119
Web Standards and Authoring Tools
10(112)
The Dreamweaver Task Force
120(1)
WYSIWYG Tools Come of Age (Two Out of Three Ain't Bad)
121(1)
From FrontPage to Expression Web Designer
122(1)
The Emergence of CSS Layout
122(9)
The Browser Upgrade Campaign
123(3)
The Flood Begins
126(2)
Countless Converts and the Help Sites They Rode in On
128(3)
The Ultimate CSS Knowledge Base
131(1)
Faddishness...with a Purpose
131(1)
The Mainstreaming of Web Standards
132(11)
Commercial Sites Take the Plunge
134(1)
Wired Digital Converts
135(2)
Turning On Designers
137(2)
The Hits Keep Coming
139(1)
The Road to Joy Is Paved with Validation
140(3)
Part II Designing and Building
5 Modern Markup
143(14)
The Secret Shame of Rotten Markup
148(2)
A Reformulation of Say What?
150(2)
Executive Summary
152(1)
Which XHTML Is Right for You?
152(5)
XHTML 2—For Me and You?
152(2)
Top to Reasons to Convert to XHTML
154(1)
Top 5 Reasons Not to Switch to XHTML
155(2)
6 XHTML: Restructuring the Web
157(20)
Converting to XHTML: Simple Rules, Easy Guidelines
158(11)
Open with the Proper DOCTYPE and Namespace
158(3)
Declare Your Content Type
161(2)
Write All Tags in Lowercase
163(2)
Quote All Attribute Values
165(1)
All Attributes Require Values
166(1)
Close All Tags
167(1)
Close "Empty" Tags, Too
167(1)
No Double Dashes Within a Comment
168(1)
Encode All less than and & Characters 168
Executive Summary: The Rules of XHTML
169(6)
Character Encoding: The Dull, the Duller, and the Truly Dull
169(2)
Structural Healing—It's Good for Me
171(1)
Marking Up Your Document for Sense Instead of Style
171(4)
Visual Elements and Structure
175(2)
7 Tighter, Firmer Pages Guaranteed: Structure and Meta-Structure in Strict and Hybrid Markup
177(28)
Must Every Element Be Structural?
178(9)
div, id, and Other Assistants
179(4)
Semantic Markup and Reusability
183(4)
Hybrid Layouts and Compact Markup:
Dos and Don'ts
187(8)
Giving Names to Bad Things
187(1)
Common Errors in Hybrid Markup
188(3)
divs Are Just All Right
191(1)
Loving the id
192(2)
Banish Redundant Table Cells
194(1)
Outdated Methods on Parade
195(10)
The Year of the Map
195(1)
The Map and Its Discontents
196(1)
No Access, No Structure
197(1)
Slicing and Dicing
197(1)
The Slice Comes of Age
198(1)
The Redundant Verbosity of Redundantly Verbose Tables
199(1)
Bad CSS Comes to Town
200(4)
Moving On
204(1)
8 XHTML by Example: A Hybrid Layout (Part I)
205(14)
Benefits of Transitional Methods Used in These Chapters
206(1)
Style Sheets Instead of JavaScript
206(1)
Basic Approach (Overview)
206(8)
Separate Tables: CSS and Accessibility Advantages
208(1)
The What and Why of Skip Navigation
208(5)
Additional id Attributes
213(1)
First Pass Markup: Same as Last Pass Markup
214(5)
Navigational Markup: The First Table
215(1)
Presentation, Semantics, Purity, and Sin
216(1)
Content Markup: The Second Table
217(2)
9 CSS Basics
219(24)
CSS Overview
220(2)
CSS Benefits
220(2)
Anatomy of Styles
222(12)
Selectors, Declarations, Properties, and Values
222(1)
Multiple Declarations
223(1)
Whitespace and Case Insensitivity
224(1)
Alternative and Generic Values
225(1)
Grouped Selectors
226(1)
Inheritance and Its Discontents
226(2)
Descendant Selectors
228(1)
id Selectors and Descendant Selectors
229(1)
Class Selectors
230(1)
Combining Selctors to Create Sophisticated Design Effects
231(3)
External, Embedded, and Inline Styles
234(4)
External Style Sheets
234(4)
Inline Styles
238(1)
The "Best-Case Scenario" Design Method
238(6)
From Embedded to External Styles: The Two-Sheet Method
239(1)
Relative and Absolute File References
240(1)
Benefits of the Best-Case Scenario and Two-Sheet Methods
240(3)
10 CSS in Action: A Hybrid Layout (Part II)
243(28)
Preparing Images
244(2)
Establishing Basic Parameters
246(13)
Overall Styles, More About Shorthand and Margins
246(1)
Hide and Block
247(2)
Coloring the Links (Introducing Pseudo-Classes)
249(2)
Sketching in Other Common Elements
251(2)
More About Font Sizes
253(3)
Laying Out the Page Divisions
256(3)
Navigation Elements: First Pass
259(3)
Navigation Bar CSS: First Try at Second Pass
262(1)
Navigation Bar CSS: Final Pass
263(5)
Final Steps: External Styles and the "You Are Here" Effect
268(3)
11 Working with Browsers Part I: DOCTYPE Switching and Standards Mode
271(14)
The Saga of DOCTYPE Switching
272(8)
Controlling Browser Performance: The DOCTYPE Switch
274(3)
A Complete Listing of Complete XHTML DOCTYPEs
277(3)
Celebrate Browser Diversity! (Or at Least Learn to Live with It)
280(5)
12 Working with Browsers Part II: Box Models, Bugs, and Workarounds
285(26)
The Box Model and Its Discontents
286(12)
How the Box Model Works
287(1)
How the Box Model Breaks
288(7)
The Box Model Hack: Making CSS Safe for Democracy
295(3)
The Whitespace Bug in IE/Windows
298(4)
The "Float" Bug in IE6/Windows
302(2)
Float, Peek-a-Boo, and Beyond
304(1)
Flash and QuickTime: Objects of Desire?
304(7)
Embeddable Objects: A Tale of Hubris and Revenge
305(1)
Twice-Cooked Satay: Embedding Multimedia While Supporting Standards
306(1)
A Fly in the Ointment: Object Failures
307(1)
A Workaday, Workaround World
308(3)
13 Working with Browsers Part III: Typography
311(20)
Size Matters
311(1)
User Control
312(1)
Old-School Horrors
312(3)
Points of Difference
314(1)
A Standard Size at Last
315(6)
Good Works Undone with a Click
318(1)
Sniffing Oblivion: The Wrong Reaction to the Change in Browsers
318(2)
Standard Sizes and Best Practices
320(1)
Sizing With Ems: the Laughter and The Tears
321(1)
User Choices and Em Units
321(1)
A Passion for Pixels
322(3)
The Smallest Unit: It's Absolutely Relative
323(1)
The Trouble with Pixels
324(1)
The Font-Size Keyword Method
325(8)
Why Keywords May Beat Ems and Percentages
325(1)
Initial Problems with Keyword Implementations
326(3)
Just Your Size
329(2)
14 Accessibility Basics
331(34)
Access by the Books
333(1)
Widespread Confusion
334(4)
The Genius Puts His Foot in It
335(3)
The Law and the Layout
338(3)
Section 508 Explained
339(2)
Accessibility Myths Debunked
341(5)
Myth: Accessibility Forces You to Create Two Versions of Your Site
341(1)
Myth: A Text-Only Version Satisfies the Requirement for Equal or Equivalent Access
341(1)
Myth: Accessibility Costs Too Much
341(2)
Myth: Accessibility Forces You to Create Primitive, Low-End Designs
343(1)
Myth: According According In Section 508, Sites Must Look the Same in All Browsers and User Agents
344(1)
Myth: Accessibility Is "Just for Disabled People"
344(1)
Myth: Dreamweaver MX/Cynthia Says/LIFT/Insert Tool Name Here Solves All Compliance Problems
345(1)
Myth: Designers Can Freely Ignore Accessibility Laws if Their Clients Tell Them To
346(1)
Accessibility Tips, Element by Element
346(10)
Images
346(3)
Apple's QuickTime and Other Streaming Video Media
349(1)
Macromedia Flash 4/5
349(1)
Macromedia Flash MX and Flash 8
349(2)
Color
351(1)
CSS
351(2)
Rollovers and Other Scripted Behaviors
353(1)
Forms
354(1)
Image Maps
355(1)
Table Layouts
355(1)
Tables Used for Data
355(1)
Frames, Applets
356(1)
Flashing or Blinking Elements
356(1)
Tools of the Trade
356(2)
Loving Cynthia
358(4)
Keeping Tabs: Our Good Friend, the tabindex Attribute
358(4)
Planning for Access: How You Benefit
362(3)
15 Working with DOM-Based Scripts
365(14)
DOM by the books
366(1)
What's a DOM?
367(13)
A Standard Way to Make Web Pages Behave Like Applications
368(2)
So Where Does It Work?
370(1)
Please, DOM, Don't Hurt 'Em
371(3)
Style Switchers: Aiding Access, Offering Choice
374(5)
16 A CSS Redesign
379(12)
Defining Requirements
380(11)
Top Ten Requirements
380(2)
Laying the Faux-dation
382(4)
Bannerama
386(4)
Finishing Up
390(1)
Web Standards Bookshelf 391(2)
Index 393

Rewards Program

Write a Review