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Early Childhood Curriculum : Developmental Bases for Learning and Teaching,9780131704404
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Early Childhood Curriculum : Developmental Bases for Learning and Teaching

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780131704404

ISBN10:
0131704400
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/1/2006
Publisher(s):
Prentice Hall
List Price: $100.00
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Summary

With its chronological approach from infancy through Grade 3, this text directly ties curriculum to the understanding of child development. Key changes to this EDITION include o the addition of instructional strategies for meeting standards o information on how teachers can address increased demands for accountability and maintain a quality program o expanded content on integrating the curriculum o a focus on balanced literacy o new discussions on factors that put children at risk

Table of Contents

CHAPTER ONE The Changing Role of the Teacher in Developing Curriculum for Diverse Populations 1(20)
Chapter Objectives
1(1)
Introduction
2(1)
Who Are the Children Served in Early Childhood Programs?
2(10)
Children in Early Childhood Programs Are Diverse
3(3)
Early Childhood Programs and At-Risk Learners
6(6)
The Complex Nature of Settings for Early Childhood Programs
12(4)
Public School Programs
12(1)
Nonpublic School Programs
13(2)
Child Care
15(1)
Continuing Complexity in Preschool Programs
15(1)
The Changing Role of the Teacher in Developing Curriculum for Early Childhood Programs
16(3)
The Role of the Teacher in Developing Curriculum for Diverse Populations 16 Multicultural Curriculum
17(1)
Curriculum for Children from Diverse Family Environments
17(1)
Curriculum for Children with Special Needs
18(1)
The Role of the Teacher in Involving Parents in Curriculum Development
18(1)
The Role of the Teacher in Addressing Conflicts Between Theory and Practice in Curriculum Development
18(1)
Summary
19(1)
Study Questions
20(1)
CHAPTER TWO Historical and Theoretical Bases for Appropriate Programs in Early Childhood Settings 21(24)
Chapter Objectives
21(1)
Historical Roots of Early Childhood Education
22(10)
Rural Schools
22(1)
The Evolution of Early Childhood Education
23(2)
The Progressive Era
25(1)
Nursery School and Child Care Movements
26(1)
The Influence of Maria Montessori
26(1)
Urbanization of Public Schools
27(1)
A Period of Innovation: The 1950's and 1960's
27(1)
The Evolution of Early Childhood Programs for Populations at Risk
28(1)
African American Education
29(1)
Latino Education
30(1)
Native American Education
30(1)
Minority Education During the Depression and War Years
30(1)
Early Childhood Programs for Children with Disabilities
30(1)
Intervention and Compensatory Programs in the 1960's and 1970's
31(1)
Theoretical Bases of Development
32(6)
Maturational Theory
32(1)
Psychoanalytic Theory
33(1)
Psychosocial Theory
33(2)
Behaviorist Theory
35(1)
Social Learning Theory
35(1)
Cognitive-Developmental Theory/ Constructivism
36(2)
Early Childhood Curriculum Practices Today: Historical Influences Revisited
38(4)
The Expanding Roles of Early Childhood Education
39(1)
Parental Interest in Learning in the Early Childhood Years
39(1)
Expansion of Child Care
40(1)
Expansion of Preschool Programs in Public Schools
41(1)
Summary
42(1)
Study Questions
43(2)
CHAPTER THREE The Need for Quality Programs in Early Childhood Education 45(30)
Chapter Objectives
45(1)
Introduction
46(1)
Challenges to Quality in Early Childhood Programs
46(1)
Goals for Quality Early Childhood Programs
47(4)
Staff Training, Licensing, and Funding
47(1)
Characteristics of Quality Programs
48(3)
How Classical and Contemporary Theories Inform Quality Early Childhood Programs
51(3)
Applying Classical Theories
51(1)
Theory and Cultural Relevance: Ecological Theory
52(2)
Gardner's Theory of Intelligence
54(1)
Models of Quality Early Childhood Programs
54(18)
The Montessori Approach
54(4)
Developmentally Appropriate Practices
58(4)
High/Scope Curriculum
62(3)
Reggio Emilia
65(4)
The Project Approach
69(3)
Summary
72(1)
Study Questions
73(2)
CHAPTER FOUR Developmental Characteristics of Young Children from Birth to 8 Years: Implications for Learning 75(36)
Chapter Objectives
75(1)
Birth to 2 Years: The Sensorimotor Stage
76(3)
Cognitive Development
76(1)
Physical Development
77(1)
Language Development
77(1)
Social-Emotional Development
77(2)
Characteristics and Competencies: Birth to 6 Months
79(2)
Characteristics and Competencies: 6 to 12 Months
81(1)
Characteristics and Competencies: 12to18Months
81(3)
Characteristics and Competencies: 18 to 24 Months
84(1)
Infant and Toddler Development: Implications for Learning
85(2)
Ages 2 to 5: The Preoperational Stage
87(4)
Cognitive Development
88(1)
Physical Development
88(1)
Language Development
89(1)
Social-Emotional Development
90(1)
Characteristics and Competencies: 2 to 5 Years
91(3)
Development in the Preschool Years: Implications for Learning
94(4)
Age 5 to 8 Years: The Transition from Preoperations to Concrete Operations.
98(9)
Cognitive Development
104(1)
Physical Development
104(1)
Language Development
105(1)
Social-Emotional Development
106(1)
Characteristics and Competencies in Children Ages 5 to 8 Years: Implications for Learning and Instruction
107(2)
Cognitive Development
108(1)
Physical Development
108(1)
Social-Emotional Development
108(1)
Summary
109(1)
Study Questions
110(1)
CHAPTER FIVE Organizing Infant-Toddler Programs 111(30)
Chapter Objectives
111(1)
The Evolution of Infant-Toddler Programs
112(8)
Infants and Toddlers Prior to the 20th Century
112(1)
Infants and Toddlers in the 20th Century
113(4)
Infant-Toddler Programs Today
117(3)
Considerations for Developing Models for Infant-Toddler Programs
120(2)
Theoretical Bases for Infant-Toddler Programs
120(2)
Characteristics of a Quality Infant-Toddler Model
122(16)
The Role of Quality Caregivers
122(1)
The Role of the Environment
122(1)
The Role of Play
123(4)
The Role of Routines
127(1)
The Role of Parents
127(3)
Planning and Managing Infant-Toddler Developmental Experiences
130(3)
The Role of Thematic Curriculum for Infants and Toddlers
133(1)
The Role of Assessment in Infant-Toddler Programs
133(5)
Summary
138(2)
Study Questions
140(1)
CHAPTER SIX Infant-Toddler Curriculum: Birth to Age 2 141(36)
Chapter Objectives
141(1)
Curriculum for Physical Development
142(7)
Nurturing Physical Development in Infants and Toddlers
142(7)
Curriculum for Cognitive Development
149(8)
Nurturing Cognitive Development in Infants and Toddlers
149(8)
Curriculum for Language Development
157(8)
Nurturing Language Development in Infants and Toddlers
157(8)
Curriculum for Social Development
165(5)
Nurturing Social Development in Infants and Toddlers
165(5)
Curriculum for the Expressive Arts
170(4)
Nurturing Expressive Arts in Infants and Toddlers
170(4)
Summary: A Word of Caution
174(1)
Study Questions
175(2)
CHAPTER SEVEN A Developmental Model for Preschool Programs 177(34)
Chapter Objectives
177(1)
Introduction
178(1)
The Differences Between Theory and Practice
178(1)
Considerations for Developing a Model for Preschool Education
179(2)
Principles of Child Development
179(1)
Balanced Curriculum
180(1)
Parent, Teacher, and Child Relationships
180(1)
Assessment and Accountability
181(1)
Diversity in Children and Families
181(1)
Characteristics of a Quality Developmental Model
181(8)
Developmentally Appropriate Practices: Using Principles of Development
182(1)
The Inclusive Classroom
183(1)
The Culturally Responsive Classroom
184(1)
The Integrated Classroom
185(1)
The Teacher's Role
185(1)
The Role of the Environment
186(1)
The Role of Technology
186(1)
The Role of Play
187(2)
The Role of the Daily Schedule
189(1)
Planning and Managing Instruction
189(16)
Understanding Developmental-Thematic Curriculum
190(1)
Roles of Developmental-Thematic Curriculum
191(1)
Designing Developmental-Thematic Curriculum Units
192(11)
Implementing Developmental-Thematic Curriculum
203(2)
The Role of Assessment in Preschool Programs
205(3)
Assessment of Child Development and Learning
206(1)
Assessment of Children in Preschool Programs
207(1)
Assessment of Program Components
207(1)
Summary
208(1)
Study Questions
209(2)
CHAPTER EIGHT Preschool Curriculum: Ages 3 to 5: Language and Cognitive Development 211(42)
Chapter Objectives
211(1)
Introduction
212(1)
Curriculum for Language Development
212(3)
How Young Children Develop Language
212(1)
Forms of Language
213(1)
Language Differences in the Preschool Years
213(2)
Planning for Language Development
215(3)
The Role of Play in Language Development
216(1)
The Role of the Teacher in Language Development and Literacy
216(1)
The Role of Parents in Language Development
217(1)
The Role of the Environment in Language and Literacy
217(1)
Designing Curriculum for Language Development
218(2)
Experiences That Promote Expressive Language
219(1)
Experiences That Promote Receptive Language
220(1)
Developing Foundations for Literacy
220(2)
Resolving the Issues in Beginning Literacy Instruction
221(1)
What Does the Young Child Need to Know to Develop Literacy?
222(1)
Goals for Literacy
222(6)
Emergent Writing
223(2)
Emergent Reading
225(3)
Designing Language Curriculum for Children with Disabilities and Language Differences
228(4)
Curriculum for Cognitive Development
232(8)
How Young Children Develop Concepts
232(1)
Planning for Cognitive Development
233(1)
Goals for Cognitive Development: Mathematics and Science
234(4)
The Role of the Teacher in Cognitive Development
238(1)
The Role of the Environment and Play in Cognitive Development
239(1)
Designing Curriculum for Cognitive Development
240(1)
The Integrated Curriculum
240(9)
Development and Integrated Curriculum
240(8)
Creativity and Integrated Curriculum
248(1)
Using Thematic Units as a Focus for Integrated Curriculum
248(1)
Designing Cognitive Curriculum for Children with Disabilities
249(2)
Summary
251(1)
Study Questions
252(1)
CHAPTER NINE Preschool Curriculum: Ages 3 to 5: Social and Physical Development 253(34)
Chapter Objectives
253(1)
Curriculum for Social Development
254(16)
Understanding Social Development
254(1)
Life Changes That Affect Social Development
254(2)
Planning for Social Development
256(4)
The Role of Play in Social Development
260(1)
The Role of the Environment in Social Development
261(1)
The Role of the Teacher in Social Development
261(1)
Designing Curriculum for Social Development
262(2)
Designing Curriculum for Social Science
264(3)
Designing Integrated Curriculum for Children's Life Changes
267(3)
Curriculum for Physical Development
270(5)
Understanding Physical Development
270(2)
Planning for Physical Development
272(1)
The Role of Play in Physical Development
272(1)
The Role of the Environment in Physical Development
273(1)
The Role of the Teacher in Physical Development
274(1)
Designing Curriculum for Physical Development
275(9)
The Integrated Curriculum for Physical Development
279(4)
Designing Physical Development Activities for Children with Disabilities
283(1)
Summary
284(1)
Study Questions
285(2)
CHAPTER TEN A Model for Programs for Children 5 to 8 287(36)
Chapter Objectives
287(1)
The Significance of Developmental Changes in the Primary Grades
288(2)
Physical Development
288(1)
Cognitive Development
289(1)
Social and Emotional Development
289(1)
The Role of Play in the Primary Grades
290(1)
Describing Appropriate Curriculum for Children Ages 5 to 8
291(1)
Describing a Curriculum for Continuing Developmental Needs
291(1)
The Primary Grades: Models for Children Ages 5 to 8
292(3)
The British Infant School Model
293(1)
Team Teaching
294(1)
Multiage Grouping
295(1)
Characteristics of the Primary Model
295(2)
Developmental Curriculum
295(1)
Integrated Curriculum
296(1)
Systematic Instruction
296(1)
Cooperative Learning Groups
296(1)
Peer Teaching
297(1)
Planning and Managing Instruction
297(18)
The Role of the Environment
297(2)
Designing Thematic Curriculum
299(12)
Implementing Thematic Curriculum
311(2)
Incorporating Systematic Instruction
313(2)
The Role of Assessment in Kindergarten and Primary Grades
315(4)
The Purposes of Assessment in Kindergarten and Primary Grades
316(3)
Summary
319(1)
Study Questions
320(3)
CHAPTER ELEVEN The Transitional Curriculum: Ages 5 to 8: Language Arts 323(26)
Chapter Objectives
323(1)
Curriculum for Language Arts
324(21)
The Continuing Process of Language Development
324(1)
Addressing the Language Needs of Diverse Speakers
325(1)
Designing Curriculum for Language Development
326(2)
Cooperative Learning Groups
328(1)
The Continuing Process of Literacy Development
328(2)
The Language Arts Program for Children Ages 5 to 8
330(9)
Organizing the Language Arts Program
339(2)
Accommodating the Learning Differences of Students with Special Needs
341(4)
The Integrated Curriculum
345(1)
Summary
346(1)
Study Questions
347(2)
CHAPTER TWELVE The Transitional Curriculum: Ages 5 to 8: Mathematics and Science 349(26)
Chapter Objectives
349(1)
Curriculum for Mathematics
350(12)
Trends and Issues in Mathematics
350(2)
Planning the Mathematics Program
352(2)
The Role of Technology in the Mathematics Program
354(1)
Organizing the Mathematics Program
355(4)
Designing Curriculum for the Mathematics Program
359(2)
Accommodating Learning Differences Among Students
361(1)
Curriculum for Science
362(9)
How Young Children Learn About Science
362(1)
Trends and Issues in Science
363(1)
Planning the Science Program
364(1)
Incorporating the Science Process
364(1)
The Role of the Environment
364(2)
The Role of the Teacher
366(1)
Organizing the Science Program
366(1)
Designing Curriculum for the Science Program
367(2)
Integrated Experiences That Promote Science
369(2)
The Integrated Curriculum
371(1)
Summary
372(1)
Study Questions
373(2)
CHAPTER THIRTEEN The Transitional Curriculum: Ages 5 to 8: Social Studies and Physical Education 375(20)
Chapter Objectives
375(1)
Curriculum for Social Studies
376(9)
Social Development of Ages 5 to 8
376(2)
Activities for Nurturing Continued Social Development
378(1)
Social Studies Curriculum in Kindergarten and the Primary Grades
379(1)
Goals for Social Studies
379(4)
Designing Curriculum for Social Studies
383(1)
The Integrated Curriculum for Social Studies
383(2)
Curriculum for Physical Education
385(7)
Physical Development of Children Ages 5 to 8
385(2)
Planning for Physical Development
387(1)
Designing Curriculum for Physical Development and Education
388(2)
The Integrated Curriculum for Physical Development
390(2)
Summary
392(1)
Study Questions
393(2)
CHAPTER FOURTEEN Teaching in the Real World 395(6)
Beth
396(1)
Renee
397(1)
Yolanda
397(1)
Susan
397(1)
Rollo and Nancy
398(1)
Gladys
398(1)
Hector
398(1)
Loretta
399(1)
Loisa
399(2)
References 401(20)
Name Index 421(5)
Subject Index 426


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