9780521674072

Early Cold War Spies: The Espionage Trials that Shaped American Politics

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780521674072

  • ISBN10:

    0521674077

  • Edition: 1st
  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2006-08-28
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
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Summary

Communism was never a popular ideology in America, but the vehemence of American anticommunism varied from passive disdain in the 1920s to fervent hostility in the early years of the Cold War. Nothing so stimulated the white hot anticommunism of the late 1940s and 1950s more than a series of spy trials that revealed that American Communists had co-operated with Soviet espionage against the United States and had assisted in stealing the technical secrets of the atomic bomb as well as penetrating the U.S. State Department, the Treasury Department, and the White House itself. This book reviews the major spy cases of the early Cold War (Hiss-Chambers, Rosenberg, Bentley, Gouzenko, Coplon, Amerasia and others) and the often-frustrating clashes between the exacting rules of the American criminal justice system and the requirements of effective counter-espionage.

Author Biography

John Earl Haynes is a 20th-Century Political Historian in the Manuscript Division of the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Harvey Klehr is the Andrew W. Mellon Professor of Politics and History at Emory University in Atlanta

Table of Contents

Series Editor's Foreword xi
1 Introduction: Early Cold War Spy Cases 1(22)
Early Cold War Spy Trials
3(3)
A Word about Trials and History
6(1)
Spy Trials and McCarthyism
7(1)
Politics of the Early Cold War
8(15)
2 The Precursors 23(37)
Amerasia: The First Cold War Spy Case
25(23)
Gouzenko: A Canadian Spy Case with American Repercussions
48(12)
3 Elizabeth Bentley: The Case of the Blond Spy Queen 60(32)
The Silvermaster Group
66(1)
The Perlo Group
67(6)
The Trials of William Remington
73(9)
Venona and Bentley's Vindication
82(6)
The Bentley Case: A Conclusion
88(4)
4 The Alger Hiss—Whittaker Chambers Case 92(46)
Whittaker Chambers
93(4)
Alger Hiss
97(2)
Dueling Testimony
99(4)
The Slander Suit, the Baltimore Documents, and the Pumpkin Papers
103(4)
The Grand Jury
107(13)
The First Hiss Trial
120(4)
The Second Hiss Trial
124(6)
Chambers after the Trial
130(2)
Hiss after the Trial
132(1)
The Historical Argument
132(6)
5 The Atomic Espionage Cases 138(54)
Klaus Fuchs: The Background
139(3)
Theodore Hall: The Background
142(1)
Rosenberg and Greenglass: The Background
143(3)
J. Robert Oppenheimer and Communists at the Berkeley Radiation Laboratory
146(5)
The Red Bomb and the Postwar Trials
151(26)
J. Robert Oppenheimer after the Manhattan Project
177(5)
The Trials of Rudolf Abel and Morris and Lona Cohen
182(10)
6 Judith Coplon: The Spy Who Got Away with It 192(16)
Coplon's Recruitment into Espionage
193(6)
The Washington Trial
199(5)
The New York Trial
204(1)
On Appeal: Justice Frustrated
205(3)
7 The Soble-Soblen Case: Last of the Early Cold War Spy Trials 208(22)
Infiltrating the Trotskyist Movement
209(3)
Mark Zborowski
212(8)
Boris Morros: Double Agent
220(2)
The Soble Ring Trials
222(3)
The Robert Soblen Trial
225(5)
8 Conclusion: The Decline of the Ideological Spy 230(13)
Spy Trials and Understanding Soviet Espionage
232(2)
Counterespionage and the American Criminal Justice System
234(2)
The Elusive Balance between Security and Liberty
236(7)
Index 243

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