9780198186403

Einstein's Wake Relativity, Metaphor, and Modernist Literature

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780198186403

  • ISBN10:

    0198186401

  • Format: Hardcover
  • Copyright: 2002-02-21
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press

Note: Supplemental materials are not guaranteed with Rental or Used book purchases.

Purchase Benefits

  • Free Shipping On Orders Over $35!
    Your order must be $35 or more to qualify for free economy shipping. Bulk sales, PO's, Marketplace items, eBooks and apparel do not qualify for this offer.
  • Get Rewarded for Ordering Your Textbooks! Enroll Now
List Price: $186.66 Save up to $18.67
  • Rent Book $167.99
    Add to Cart Free Shipping

    TERM
    PRICE
    DUE

Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included. This is true even if the title states it includes any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

The revolution in literary form and aesthetic consciousness called modernism arose as the physical sciences were revising their most fundamental concepts: space, time, matter, and the concept of 'science' itself. The coincidence has often been remarked upon in general terms, but rarelyconsidered in detail. Einstein's Wake argues that the interaction of modernism and the 'new physics' is best understood by reference to the metaphors which structured these developments. These metaphors, widely disseminated in the popular science writing of the period, provided a language with whichmodernist writers could articulate their responses to the experience of modernity. Beginning with influential aspects of nineteenth-century physics, Einstein's Wake qualifies the notion that Einstein alone was responsible for literary 'relativity'; it goes on to examine the fine detail of his legacyin literary appropriations of scientific metaphors, with particular attention to Virginia Woolf, D. H. Lawrence, Wyndham Lewis, and T. S. Eliot.

Author Biography

Michael H. Whitworth is Lecturer in English, University of Wales, Bangor.

Table of Contents

Introduction 1(25)
The Specialist, the Generalist, and the Populist
26(32)
Things Fall Apart: The Secret Agent and Literary Entropy
58(25)
Descriptionism: Consuming Sensations
83(28)
An Entente Cordiale? The New Relations of Literature and Science
111(35)
Invisible Men and Fractured Atoms
146(24)
Simultaneity: A Return Ticket to Waterloo
170(28)
Non-Euclidean Humanity
198(32)
Conclusion 230(8)
Select Bibliography 238(9)
Index 247

Rewards Program

Write a Review