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Elementary Science Methods with Infotrac: A Constructivist Approach,9780495004950

Elementary Science Methods with Infotrac: A Constructivist Approach

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780495004950

ISBN10:
0495004952
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/22/2005
Publisher(s):
Wadsworth Publishing
List Price: $134.66

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Summary

In this pioneering text, Martin uses a constructivist approach to guide students in learning how to teach in a constructivist manner. Grounded in the belief that it is more important for children to learn how to do science than it is for them to learn about science, this text is predicated on the reality that teachers of elementary science do not need to know a great deal of science to be good science teachers, but need to be co-inquirers with their students. To facilitate your students' learning, this text features a wealth of exercises: for teacher candidates, the book includes open-ended inquiry activities that help them to construct their own personal conceptualizations about science content and teaching science in the elementary school; and, it contains over 170 process-oriented, open-ended activities that teachers can use to encourage children to develop and perform their own investigations. The Book Companion CD-ROM, included with each new copy, provides tools and resources, such as additional activities and video, which students can use both in their college course and later in elementary science classrooms. All activities are linked to National Science Education Standards for content, professional development, assessment, and teaching, and the activities contain suggestions of appropriate children's literature.

Table of Contents

PART 1 Constructing the Elementary Science Program
1(380)
The Science Education Imperative
3(36)
How Much Science Does the Elementary Science Teacher Need to Know?
5(8)
Amount of Science Known Today
6(1)
Obsolescence of Scientific Knowledge
7(1)
Changing Scientific Knowledge
7(4)
How Much Science Does the Elementary Science Teacher Need to Know?
11(2)
Right and Wrong
13(6)
Recognizing the Unexpected
14(2)
Perception
16(2)
Listening
18(1)
The Processes of Science
19(6)
Using the Processes of Science
20(1)
History of the Process Approach to Science Education
21(4)
Ownership of Knowledge and Thought
25(6)
Mystery Box
25(2)
Ownership
27(1)
Valuing Children's Thinking
27(4)
Attitudes about Science and Attitudes about Science Teaching
31(4)
Teacher Beliefs
31(4)
Teacher Voice
35(1)
Metaphors
36(1)
Research in Science Education
37(1)
Conclusion
37(1)
Additional Questions for Discussion
37(1)
Notes
38(1)
Science Education Today
39(28)
The Nature of Science
40(15)
Characteristics of the Scientific Enterprise
40(3)
Products of Science
43(11)
Interdisciplinary Nature of Science
54(1)
Goals of Elementary Science Education
55(9)
National Science Teachers Association
55(1)
American Association for the Advancement of Science
56(1)
National Science Education Standards
57(3)
No Child Left Behind
60(2)
Goals 2000: Educate America Act
62(2)
National Association for the Education of Young Children
64(1)
What Do You Think?
64(1)
Additional Questions for Discussion
65(1)
Notes
66(1)
The Processes of Science
67(110)
Observing
69(13)
Classifying
82(19)
Measuring
101(29)
Length
101(2)
Volume
103(2)
Weight or Mass
105(1)
Temperature
106(2)
Time
108(1)
Metric versus Conventional Units
109(21)
Interrelationships among the Basic Processes
130(1)
The Integrated Processes
130(1)
The Pendulum
131(6)
Identifying and Controlling Variables
137(5)
Formulating and Testing Hypotheses
142(8)
Interpreting Data
150(8)
Defining Operationally
158(4)
Experimenting
162(4)
Constructing Models
166(7)
The Process-Oriented Objective
173(1)
Conclusion
174(1)
Additional Questions for Discussion
174(1)
Notes
175(2)
Constructivism in Elementary Science Education
177(40)
Constructivism
180(8)
Prior Beliefs
182(1)
Conceptual Change
183(1)
Cognitive Disequilibration
184(2)
Validity of Self-Constructed Conceptualizations
186(2)
Inquiry
188(3)
Constructivism and Science Learning
189(2)
Piaget, the Constructivist
191(4)
Mechanism of Constructing Knowledge
191(3)
Brain Research and the Construction of Knowledge
194(1)
Vygotsky, the Social Constructivist
195(1)
Characteristics of Constructivist Teaching
196(1)
Stages of Cognitive Development
197(12)
Sensorimotor Stage
197(1)
Preoperational Stage
198(1)
Concrete Operational Stage
199(7)
Formal Operational Stage
206(3)
Stage Overlapping
209(1)
Dinosaurs and the Solar System
209(7)
Conclusion
216(1)
Additional Questions for Discussion
216(1)
Notes
216(1)
Inquiry
217(36)
The Expository-Discovery Continuum
218(14)
Expository Methodology
219(1)
Free-Discovery Methodology
219(4)
Guided-Inquiry Methodology
223(3)
Process-Oriented Inquiry
226(1)
Ausubel's Instructional Model
227(2)
The Expository-Free Discovery Continuum Revisited
229(3)
Teacher Voice
232(2)
The Guided-Inquiry Lesson Plan
234(6)
Microteaching
240(2)
Is Learning Taking Place?
242(6)
Is Hands-On Minds-On?
242(1)
Deductive versus Inductive Teaching Styles
243(1)
Who Owns the Knowledge?
244(4)
A Different Kind of Bloom
248(3)
Conclusion
251(1)
Additional Questions for Discussion
251(1)
Notes
251(2)
Learner Differences
253(42)
Some Differences in the Ways Children Learn
255(1)
Learning Styles
255(17)
Visual, Auditory, and Tactile/Kinesthetic Learning Modalities
256(9)
Locus of Control
265(3)
Field Dependence/Field Independence
268(3)
Teachers' Learning Styles
271(1)
Multiple Intelligences
272(3)
Teacher Voice
275(2)
Science Education for Children with Disabilities
277(3)
Gender Bias
280(1)
Science Education for Language-Minority Children
281(3)
Science Education for Gifted and Talented Children
284(2)
Multicultural Factors
286(7)
Attitude in Multicultural Education
286(1)
Multicultural Methodology
287(2)
Multicultural Curriculum
289(4)
Conclusion
293(1)
Additional Questions for Discussion
293(1)
Notes
294(1)
Assessment
295(44)
Authentic Assessment
297(2)
What Is Assessed in Elementary Science Education?
299(14)
Assessment of Process Skills
299(7)
Assessment of Inquiry
306(4)
Assessment of Attitude
310(2)
Assessment of Content
312(1)
Additional Authentic Assessment Techniques
313(11)
Interviewing
313(2)
Journals
315(1)
Portfolios
316(6)
Assessment Techniques that Support Learner Differences
322(2)
Report Cards
324(2)
High-Stakes Testing and the Standardized Achievement Test
326(4)
Assessment of the Elementary Science Teacher and Program
330(5)
Teacher Voice
335(2)
Conclusion
337(1)
Additional Questions for Discussion
337(1)
Notes
337(2)
The Elementary Science Classroom
339(42)
Trust
340(7)
Strategies for Successful Science Activities
347(1)
Safety in the Elementary Science Classroom
348(6)
Equipment and Materials
354(1)
Animals and Plants in the Classroom
355(2)
Family Involvement
357(4)
Classroom Organization
361(1)
Cooperative Teaching and Cooperative Learning
361(2)
Time Management
363(1)
Classroom Management
364(2)
Teacher Voice
366(2)
Outdoor Classrooms
368(3)
Science Outside the Classroom
371(7)
Field Trips
371(5)
Nontraditional Science Settings
376(2)
Revisiting Your Metaphor
378(1)
Conclusion
379(1)
Additional Questions for Discussion
379(1)
Notes
379(2)
PART 2 Beyond the Science Classroom
381(124)
Reading, Writing, and Interdisciplinary Approaches
383(42)
Reading, Writing, and Literature
385(26)
Integrating Children's Literature and Science
387(14)
Science Textbooks
401(8)
The Role of Reading and Writing in Elementary Science
409(2)
Interdisciplinary Approaches
411(6)
Two Interdisciplinary Models
413(4)
Teacher Voice
417(5)
Science, Technology, and Society
419(2)
Personal Bias in STS Projects
421(1)
Conclusion
422(1)
Additional Questions for Discussion
422(1)
Notes
423(2)
Technology in Elementary Science Education
425(42)
Why Use Advanced Technology in Elementary Science Education?
429(2)
Widespread Use of Computer Technology
429(1)
Familiarity with Advanced Technology
429(1)
Technological Access to Information
429(1)
Computer Support in Inquiry Investigations
430(1)
Support of Learning Differences through Technology
430(1)
Use of Computer Technology by Scientists
431(1)
Computers in the Elementary Science Classroom
431(1)
A Technology Inquiry Continuum
432(1)
Tutoring Uses of Computers
433(1)
Interactive Uses of Computers
434(9)
Word Processing and Desktop Publishing Applications
434(1)
Spreadsheet, Database, and Graphing Applications
435(6)
Presentation Applications
441(1)
Graphic Organizer Software
441(1)
Simulation and Animation Applications
441(1)
CD-ROM Information Base Applications
442(1)
Experimenting Uses of Computers
443(2)
Evaluating Computer Software
445(2)
Sources of Computer Software
445(2)
The Internet
447(3)
Using the Internet in the Elementary Science Classroom
450(4)
WebQuests
450(1)
School and Class Web Sites
451(1)
Scientific Research
452(1)
Bringing the World into the Classroom
452(1)
Internet Safety
453(1)
E-mail
453(1)
Video in the Elementary Science Classroom
454(1)
Interactive Whiteboards
455(1)
Technology for Teachers
455(2)
Teacher Voice
457(4)
Getting Started
461(3)
Conclusion
464(1)
Additional Questions for Discussion
464(1)
Notes
465(2)
Concept Mapping in Elementary Science
467(18)
Exploring Concept Mapping
468(7)
Concept Mapping Technique
475(2)
Uses of Concept Maps in Elementary Science Education
477(5)
Using Concept Maps for Lesson Planning
478(1)
Using Concept Maps in Instruction
479(2)
Using Concept Maps for Assessment
481(1)
Uses of Concept Maps by Children
482(1)
Teacher Voice
482(2)
Conclusion
484(1)
Additional Questions for Discussion
484(1)
The Elementary Science Education Professional
485(20)
Decisions about Methodology
487(1)
Decisions about Curriculum
488(4)
The Elementary Science Teacher as Researcher
492(4)
Professional Organizations
496(3)
Science Education Organizations
497(2)
Early Childhood Education Organizations
499(1)
Professional Workshops and Seminars
499(1)
Grants
500(2)
Excellence in Science Teaching
502(1)
Conclusion
503(1)
Additional Questions for Discussion
503(1)
Notes
504(1)
PART 3 Back to the Future
505(18)
A Model of Teaching By Listening
507(16)
The Need for a Different Model
509(1)
A Model of Teaching by Listening
510(10)
Topic Selection Phase
511(3)
Plan of Action Phase
514(1)
Activity Phase
515(2)
Evaluation Phase
517(1)
The Next Cycle
517(3)
Management
520(1)
Concluding Remarks
520(2)
Notes
522(1)
Appendix A Activities Cross-Referenced to Basic Scientific Concepts and Principles 523(3)
Appendix B Listing of Children's Literature 526(4)
Glossary 530(5)
References 535(28)
Index 563


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