9780060855826

The Engaged Groom: You're Getting Married, Read This Book

by
  • ISBN13:

    9780060855826

  • ISBN10:

    0060855827

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2009-07-27
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publications
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Supplemental Materials

What is included with this book?

  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any access cards, study guides, lab manuals, CDs, etc.

Summary

Today's groom expects and is expected to take on a large and often times equal role in the planning of the big event. The days of the husbandtobe just showing up with a nice suit on and having no idea of what went into the planning are long gone. This is not to say that the groom's interests need to be the same as the bride's. This book will help the groom to choose what interests them and works well with their talents. If it is not picking out the table cloths to match the flowers, than it could be working on the menu or the invitations or even designing the wedding website. For the groom who wishes to be actively involved and not be limited by traditional wedding elements, the book will suggest ways to create a modern wedding. For example turning the focus to the enjoyment of the guests and thinking of the day as a big party, while still respecting the wishes of the families.

Table of Contents

Introduction: What Is An Engaged Groom? 1(10)
Part One THE BIG PICTURE
11(72)
Why Doing Nothing Is as Important as Anything . . . for Now
13(3)
Paying for the Wedding
16(10)
Picking a Date and Venue
26(9)
The Guest List
35(10)
Food, Booze, Music, Flowers (Yes, Flowers), and Other Details
45(33)
Choosing an Officiant
78(5)
Part Two THE FINER POINTS
83(86)
Your Best Man and Groomsmen
85(11)
What to Wear and How to Look Your Best
96(15)
Save-the-Date Announcements, Invitations, and Getting the Word Out
111(30)
Registries, Wedding Showers, and Thank-You Notes
141(28)
Part Three TAKING A BREAK . . . SORT OF
169(24)
The Rehearsal Dinner, Favors, and Other Guest Issues
171(8)
Planning the Honeymoon
179(5)
The Bachelor Party
184(9)
Part Four THE FINAL COUNTDOWN
193(34)
Confirming It All
196(4)
Seating Assignments and Other Arrangements
200(5)
Your Wedding Day Schedule
205(5)
Marriage Licenses and Blood Tests
210(8)
Wedding Rings
218(4)
One Last Breath before Taking the Plunge
222(5)
Part Five THE BIGGEST DAY OF YOUR LIFE (SO FAR)
227(34)
The Ceremony
233(10)
The Reception
243(18)
Conclusion: Don't Stop Thinking About Tomorrow 261(12)
Acknowledgments 273(2)
Index 275

Excerpts

The Engaged Groom
You're Getting Married. Read this Book.

Chapter One

Why Doing Nothing Is as Important
as Anything . . . for Now

It may seem counterintuitive, but the best thing you can do right now is nothing. I know what you're thinking: "Aren't there a million things to do?" Yes, and that's precisely the reason why you, your fiancée, and your families should agree to do absolutely nothing, at least for now.

When Leora and I got engaged, we, along with our families and friends, were riding high on a wave of excitement. Recognizing that we would quickly become mired in the minutiae of event planning, I declared a one-week moratorium on wedding details. For seven days we would make no definitive plans and would hold no meetings with facility managers, bandleaders, or stationers. We would simply sit back and enjoy ourselves for at least a little while and not let a narrow focus on details take the place of our joy at getting engaged.

Your wedding moratorium need not last a week. It could be a day, a month, or any time in between. Your personality, your bride's patience, family pressure, and your specific circumstances will dictate your timeline. If you're planning a long engagement, will your plans really change if you start making them seventy-four weeks before your wedding rather than seventy-five? With all the details that are likely to dominate your conversations, taking a deep breath before you and your fiancée dive in is a great way to get started on the right foot. (But then again, if it's February and you're hoping for a spring wedding, I wouldn't recommend waiting too long lest you find that every church, temple, and even the event room at your local Motel 6 is booked solid for the next six months.)

As for my own wedding-planning moratorium, it was a good idea at least in theory. Although I had called for a time-out of one week, too many people were too excited and had too many questions for us to hold out for the entire seven days. The moratorium turned out to be no more than the proverbial finger in the dike, stemming a flood of planning and details that couldn't be ignored.

Engaged Groom Tip

Wedding-Free Zones

Getting ready for your wedding can sometimes feel as if you are listening to a radio station called KWED, "All Wedding Planning, All the Time." Sometimes you'll just want to change the dial, if not throw the radio out the window altogether. Know your limitations. If you work late on Wednesdays, have a regular poker night with your friends on Fridays, or tend to fall asleep early on Sundays, perhaps one of those times would be good to choose as what I call a wedding-free zone.

What does it mean to be "wedding-free"? Exactly what it sounds like. During a time of your mutual choosing, you and your bride should talk about anything -- the weather, sports, the geopolitical situation in the Korean peninsula and its effect on Asian futures trading -- except your wedding. Don't talk about song lists, don't try to pick out a font for your invitation, and, for the love of everything good in this world, don't look at any color swatches. (The operative phrase in this paragraph is, of course, "a time of your mutual choosing." Remember that your fiancée might also have events she might not want to miss or nights on which she needs to just veg out in front of the TV.)

A weekly date night might be the best use of your wedding-free zone. Taking some time to check in with each other and have fun can keep you focused on why you got engaged in the first place. But just as you'd never bring work from the office on a first date, your weekly date nights should be the exclusive territory of you and your fiancée. The date night is not a time to discuss wedding plans or take cell phone calls from pushy parents. Like a carefully monitored IV drip dispensing 250 cc of perspective and relief, regularly going out for dinner, a movie, or a stroll through a park can keep both of you calm and levelheaded as your hurtle toward the big day.

The Engaged Groom
You're Getting Married. Read this Book.
. Copyright © by Doug Gordon. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Excerpted from The Engaged Groom: You're Getting Married. Read This Book by Doug Gordon
All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

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