9781857180336

Engineering Drawing for Manufacture

by
  • ISBN13:

    9781857180336

  • ISBN10:

    185718033X

  • Format: Paperback
  • Copyright: 2002-10-06
  • Publisher: Elsevier Science
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Summary

The processes of manufacture and assembly are based on the communication of engineering information via drawing. These drawings follow rules laid down in national and international standards. The organisation responsible for the international rules is the International Standards Organisation (ISO). There are hundreds of ISO standards on engineering drawing because drawing is very complicated and accurate transfer of information must be guaranteed. The information contained in an engineering drawing is a legal specification, which contractor and sub-contractor agree to in a binding contract. The ISO standards are designed to be independent of any one language and thus much symbology is used to overcome any reliance on any language. Companies can only operate efficiently if they can guarantee the correct transmission of engineering design information for manufacturing and assembly. This book is a short introduction to the subject of engineering drawing for manufacture. It should be noted that standards are updated on a 5-year rolling programme and therefore students of engineering drawing need to be aware of the latest standards. This book is unique in that it introduces the subject of engineering drawing in the context of standards.

Table of Contents

Introduction ix
List of Symbols
xi
List of Abbreviations
xiii
Principles of Engineering Drawing
1(22)
Introduction
1(1)
Technical Product Documentation
2(1)
The much-loved BS 308
3(1)
Drawing as a language
4(2)
The danger of visual illusions
6(3)
Representation, visualization and specification
9(3)
Representation and visualization
9(2)
Representation and specification
11(1)
Requirements of engineering drawings
12(6)
Sizes and layout of drawing sheets
13(3)
Types of drawings
16(2)
Manual and machine drawing
18(5)
References and further reading
21(2)
Projection Methods
23(21)
Introduction
23(1)
Perspective projection
24(1)
Axonometric projection
25(2)
Isometric projection
27(2)
Oblique projection
29(2)
Orthographic projection
31(7)
Third angle projection
31(5)
First angle projection
36(1)
Projection lines
37(1)
Why are first and third angle projections so named?
38(1)
Sectional views
39(2)
Number of views
41(3)
References and further reading
43(1)
ISO Drawing Rules
44(21)
Introduction
44(1)
Example of drawing a small hand vice
44(3)
Line types and thicknesses
47(6)
Sectioning or cross-hatching lines
53(1)
Leader lines
54(1)
Dimension lines
54(3)
The decimal marker
57(1)
Lettering, symbols and abbreviations
57(1)
Representation of common parts and features
58(3)
Adjacent parts
58(1)
Flats on cylindrical or shaped surfaces
58(1)
Screw threads
59(1)
Splines and serrations
60(1)
Gears
60(1)
Springs
60(1)
Bearings
61(1)
Seals
61(1)
Item references and lists
61(1)
Colours
62(1)
Draughtman's licence
62(3)
References and further reading
63(2)
Dimensions, Symbols and Tolerances
65(23)
Introduction
65(1)
Dimension definitions
65(3)
Functional and non-functional dimensions
66(1)
Auxiliary dimensions
67(1)
Features
67(1)
Datums
67(1)
Types of dimensioning
68(6)
Linear and angular dimensioning
69(4)
Unacceptable dimensioning practice
73(1)
Symbology
74(4)
Variation of features
78(3)
Tolerancing dimensions
81(3)
The legal implications of tolerancing
84(1)
The implications of tolerances for design
84(2)
Manufacturing variability and tolerances
86(2)
References and further reading
87(1)
Limits, Fits and Geometrical Tolerancing
88(23)
Introduction
88(1)
Relationship to functional performance
88(2)
Relationship to manufacturing processes
90(2)
ISO tolerance ranges
92(2)
Limits and fits
94(6)
Fit systems
96(1)
The `shaft basis' and the `hole basis' system of fits
96(2)
Fit types and categories
98(2)
Geometry and tolerances
100(4)
Geometric tolerances
104(5)
Tolerance boxes, zones and datums
104(1)
Geometric tolerance classes
104(5)
GTs in real life
109(2)
References and further reading
110(1)
Surface Finish Specification
111(23)
Introduction
111(1)
Roughness and waviness
112(1)
Measuring the surface finish
113(3)
Sample length and evaluation length
113(1)
Filters
114(2)
Surface finish characterization
116(7)
2D roughness parameters
118(1)
2D amplitude parameters
118(2)
2D amplitude distribution parameters
120(2)
2D spacing parameters
122(1)
2D slope parameters
122(1)
Tolerances applied to the assessment of surface finish
123(1)
Method of indicating surface finish and texture
124(6)
3D surface characterization
130(1)
Surface finish specification in the real world
130(4)
References and further reading
132(2)
Appendix: Typical Examination Questions 134(24)
Background and Rationale of the Series 158(2)
Index 160

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