9780133386004

Evidence-Based Practices for Educating Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, Pearson eText with Loose-Leaf Verison -- Access Card Package

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  • ISBN13:

    9780133386004

  • ISBN10:

    0133386007

  • Edition: 2nd
  • Format: Loose-leaf w/ Access Card
  • Copyright: 3/14/2013
  • Publisher: Pearson

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Summary

This title is only available as a loose-leaf version with Pearson eText.

 

With an emphasis on effective instruction, the second edition of Evidence-Based Practices for Educating Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders uncovers the practices that are most effective for teaching students with EBD.

 

The text’s practitioner-friendly style places emotional and behavioral disorders within the context of the classroom and includes information on how to manage student behavior, teach students specific content areas, and develop educationally meaningful and legally sound IEPs.  Chapters are filled with useful advice for teachers and cover important topics such as assessment, law, social skills training, and academic interventions.

 

0133386007 / 9780133386004 Evidence-Based Practices for Educating Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, Loose-Leaf Version with Pearson eText -- Access Card

 

Package consists of:   

0132657996 / 9780132657990 Evidence-Based Practices for Educating Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders Loose Leaf Version

0133394506 / 9780133394504 Evidence-Based Practices for Educating Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, Pearson eText -- Access Card

 

Table of Contents

Part 1 Foundations

 

1 Introduction to Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

BY CHRISTINE A. CHRISTLE AND MITCHELL L. YELL

Definition of EBD 4

Problems of Definition 4

An Alternative Definition 5

Classification of Students with EBD 5

Psychiatric Classification 6

Dimensional Classification 6

Prevalence of EBD 6

Characteristics of Students with EBD 6

Cognitive Characteristics 7

Academic Deficits 7

Language Deficits 7

School Discipline Infractions 7

Social Skill Deficits 8

Problem Behavior 8

History and Development of the Field 8

Conceptual Models 9

Psychodynamic 9

Psychoeducational 9

Ecological 10

Humanistic 10

Biophysical 10

Behavioral 10

Cognitive 10

Causal and Risk Factors 10

Internal Risk Factors 11

External Risk Factors 11

Interventions 12

Positive Behavioral Support 12

Academic Interventions 13

Behavioral Interventions 14

Social Skills Training 16

Placement Options for Students with EBD 17

Alternative Education Programs 17

Juvenile Justice 18

Mental Health 20

Chapter Summary 21

 

2 Legal Issues in Educating Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders 22

BY MITCHELL L. YELL

The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act 23

The Purpose of IDEA 23

The Major Principles of IDEA 23

IDEA 2004 and Research-Based Practices 29

Implications for Administrators and Teachers 30

Summary of IDEA 31

Disciplining Students with EBD 31

Short-Term Disciplinary Removals 31

Long-Term Disciplinary Removals 34

Problem Behavior and the IEP 35

Behavior Reduction Procedures 36

Implications for Administrators and Teachers 36

Summary of Disciplining Students with Disabilities 37

Managing Student Records 37

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act 37

Violations of FERPA 40

FERPA and IDEA 40

Implications for Administrators and Teachers 40

Summary of Managing Student Records 40

Reporting Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect 40

Legal Requirements to Report Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect 41

Reporting Requirements 41

Immunity from Lawsuits 41

Liability for Failure to Report 41

Legal Action 41

Implications for Administrators and Teachers 42

Summary of Reporting Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect 42

Teacher Liability for Student Injury and Misconduct 42

Tort Laws 42

Implications for Administrators and Teachers 44

Summary of Teacher Liability for Student Injury and Misconduct 44

Chapter Summary 44

 

3 Assessment of Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders 45

BY JAMES G. SHRINER, SCOTT P. ARDOIN,MITCHELL L. YELL, AND SUSAN J.

CARTY

IDEA and Assessment 46

Referral for Special Education 47

Procedural Safeguards and Assessment 47

Conducting the Assessment 48

Reevaluating Students in Special Education 48

Assessing Students in Special Education 49

Achievement Tests 49

Assessment and Intervention 52

Basics of Curriculum-Based Assessment 52

Curriculum-Based Measurement 53

Organizing Data 54

Performance Assessment 55

Data Sources for Behavioral Assessment 55

Rating Scales 56

Observational Procedures 56

Self-Report Measures 57

Interview Techniques 57

Situational Measures 57

Defining Behavior 57

The Concept of Multiple Gating 58

Assessing the Instructional Environment 58

Error Analysis 60

Accountability in Special Education 60

Chapter Summary 60

 

4 Applied Behavior Analysis 62

BY ERIK DRASGOW,MITCHELL L. YELL, AND JAMES HALLE

History 63

Characteristics of ABA 63

Principles of Behavior 64

Principles That Increase Behavior 64

Identifying Positive and Negative Reinforcement 66

Principles That Decrease Behavior 68

Reinforcement of Alternative Behavior 72

Problems with Punishment 72

Summary 73

Applying the Principles of Behavior 73

Defining and Describing Behavior 74

Identifying the Target Behavior 74

Defining the Target Behavior 74

Writing Behavioral Objectives 74

Assessing Behavior 76

Recording Systems 76

Recording Method 76

Recording Instruments 77

Recording Schedule 79

Graphing Data and Making Instructional Decisions 80

Graphing Data 80

Analyzing Graphed Data 84

Making Instructional Decisions 84

Using Positive Reinforcement to Change Behavior 86

Differential Reinforcement Strategies 86

Specific Differential Reinforcement Procedures and Their Applications 87

Differential Reinforcement and Punishment 89

Programming for Generalization 89

Antecedent Strategies 89

Behavior Strategies 90

Consequent Strategies 90

Promoting Generalization 91

Chapter Summary 91

 

5 Functional Behavioral Assessments and Behavior Intervention Plans 92

BY ERIK DRASGOW, CHRISTIAN A.MARTIN, ROBERT E. O’NEILL, AND

MITCHELL L. YELL

The Bases of Functional Behavioral Assessments and Behavior Intervention

Plans 93

Conceptual Basis 93

Philosophical Basis 94

Legal Basis 94

Summary 95

Functional Behavioral Assessment 95

Conducting the Functional Behavioral Assessment 96

Generic Methods for Completing an FBA 97

Indirect Methods 97

Direct Observation Methods 105

Experimental Methods 107

Functional Analysis 108

Structural Analysis 109

Positive Behavior Support and Behavior Intervention Plans 112

Characteristics of Behavior Intervention Plans 113

Building Positive Behavior Intervention Plans 113

The Competing Behavior Model 113

Implementation Fidelity 118

Data Collection 118

Crisis Management 118

Chapter Summary 123

 

6 Cognitive Behavioral Interventions 124

BY MITCHELL L. YELL, T. ROWAND ROBINSON, AND NANCY B.MEADOWS

Cognitive Behavioral Interventions 125

Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Interventions 126

Procedures of Cognitive Behavioral Intervention 128

Self-Management-Based Interventions 128

Verbal Mediation–Based Interventions 135

Implementing Cognitive Behavioral Interventions 152

Assessment 152

Program Planning and Implementation 152

Generalization of Cognitive Behavioral Interactions 153

Chapter Summary 154

 

7 Social Skills Instruction 155

BY NANCY B.MEADOWS

Formal Social Skills Instruction 156

Social Skills Assessments 157

Assumptions of Social Skills Instruction 159

Structured Learning Approach 160

Teaching of Presocial Skills 162

Social Skills Strategy Instruction 162

Published Social Skills Curricula 163

How to Choose and Implement a Social Skills Curriculum 164

Informal Social Skills Instruction 165

Social Competence and Social Skills 165

Social Competence and Students with EBD 167

Classroom Management Encouraging Prosocial Behavior 168

Use of a Social Task Model 172

Cooperative Learning and Social Skills 175

Chapter Summary 175

 

8 Developing Educationally Meaningful and Legally Sound Individualized

Education Programs 190

BY MITCHELL L. YELL AND ANTHONY J. PLOTNER

Legal Requirements 191

Procedural Requirements 191

Substantive Requirements 193

Problems in IEP Development 194

The IEP Planning Process 195

Referral and Assessment 196

IEP Team Participants 197

The IEP Document 199

Special Considerations in IEP Development 206

Placement Decisions 206

Implementing the IEP 207

Reviewing and Revising the IEP 207

Developing Educationally Meaningful and Legally Sound IEPs 208

Completing the IEP 214

Chapter Summary 214

Part 2 Classroom and Behavior Management 215

 

10 Classroom and Behavior Management I: Preventing Problem Behavior in the

Classroom

BY MITCHELL L. YELL

The Classroom Management Problem 236

Prevention and Classroom Management 237

The Research of Jacob Kounin 238

The Curriculum of Control 238

Proactive Versus Reactive Classroom Management 239

Primary Components of a Proactive Classroom Management System 239

Teacher Behaviors and Attitudes 239

Teacher Authority and Credibility 243

Classroom Structure 246

Effective Teaching 249

Developing and Implementing a Proactive Classroom Management System 252

Step 1: Develop Classroom Procedures and Teach Them to Students 252

Step 2: Develop Classroom Rules and Teach Them to Students 256

Step 3: Monitor and Acknowledge Correct Performance of Expected

Behaviors 257

Step 4: Develop Clear and Consistent Procedures for Discouraging Problem

Behavior 258

Step 5: Collect Data on the Classroom Management System 259

Chapter Summary 260

 

11 Classroom and Behavior Management II: Responding to Problem Behavior 261

BY MITCHELL L. YELL

The Nature of Problem Behavior 262

Ineffective Responding to Problem Behavior 262

Ignoring 262

Nattering 263

Yelling and Threatening 263

Issuing Commands When a Student Is Agitated 263

Engaging in Escalating Interactions with Students 264

Principles to Follow in Responding to Problem Behavior 265

Principle #1: Emphasize Preventive Measures 265

Principle #2: Modify the Learning Environment 266

Principle #3: Use Precorrection Strategies 267

Principle #4: Respond Privately Rather than Publicly If Possible 268

Principle #5: Respond Consistently and Fairly 268

Principle #6: Use Alpha Commands 269

Principle #7: Maintain a Student’s Dignity When Responding 269

Principle #8: Maintain a Calm Attitude and Demeanor 269

Principle #9: Develop a Game Plan for Responding to Student Problem

Behavior 270

Principle #10: Provide Contingent Reinforcement for Appropriate

Behavior 270

Responding to Problem Behavior 270

Responding to Minor Problem Behaviors 271

Responding to Noncompliance 272

Responding to Severe Misbehavior 275

Developing Crisis Management Plans 278

An Algorithm for Responding to Problem Behavior 280

Chapter Summary 281

 

12 Classroom and Behavior Management III: Intervening with Problem Behavior 282

BY MITCHELL L. YELL

Considerations When Intervening to Address Student Problem Behavior 283

Behavior Enhancement Interventions 284

Identifying Reinforcers 284

Types of Reinforcers 285

Interventions 286

Token Economies 286

Level Systems 292

Behavioral Contracting 295

Group-Oriented Contingencies 298

Behavior Reduction Procedures 304

Implementation Guidelines 304

Types of Interventions 306

Response Cost 306

Time-Out 309

Overcorrection 313

Administrative and Legal Guidelines When Using Behavior Reduction

Interventions 315

Chapter Summary 317

Part 3 Teaching Students with EBD 319

 

13 Teaching Students with EBD I: Effective Teaching 320

BY MITCHELL L. YELL AND MICHAEL E. ROZALSKI

Do Teachers of Students with EBD Use Effective Instructional Strategies? 321

Principles of Effective Instruction 322

Principle #1: Maximize Academic Engaged Time 322

Principle #2: Ensure High Rates of Correct Academic Responding 325

Principle #3: Maximize the Amount of Content Covered 327

Principle #4: Match Assignments to Student Ability 328

Principle #5: Teach Academic Content Explicitly 329

Principle #6: Scaffold Student Instruction 335

Principle #7: Use Direct Instruction 335

Principle #8: Monitor Student Progress 337

Maintaining Effectiveness 338

Keep Up with Field Research 338

Self-Evaluate 340

Chapter Summary 341

 

14 Teaching Students with EBD II: Evidence-Based Instructional Procedures 342

BY MICHAEL E. ROZALSKI, PAUL J. RICCOMINI, AND MITCHELL L. YELL

Teaching Reading 343

Components of Effective Reading Instruction 343

Teaching Procedures 347

Summary 350

Teaching Writing 350

Models for Teaching Written Expression 351

Teaching Procedures 353

Summary 355

Teaching Mathematics 355

Teaching Mathematics to Students with EBD 356

Designing an Effective Math Lesson 357

Considering New Instructional Practices in Mathematics 362

Summary 370

Teaching Study Skills 370

Listening Skills 370

Test-Taking Skills 371

Reference and Research Skills 373

Thinking Skills 374

Memory Skills 374

Note-Taking Skills 376

Summary 378

Chapter Summary 378

 

15 Teaching Students with EBD III: Planning Instruction and Monitoring Student

Performance 379

BY MITCHELL L. YELL, TODD W. BUSCH, AND DAVID C. ROGERS

The Nature of Instructional Planning 380

Planning What to Teach 380

Using IEP Goals to Guide Instruction 380

Using Assessment to Guide Instruction 381

Using State Standards to Guide Instruction 381

Planning How to Teach 381

Using the Systematic Teaching and Recording Tactic (START) for Long-Range

Planning 382

Writing Daily Lesson Plans Using START 384

Instructional Objectives 384

Instructional Activities 387

Materials and Time 388

Evaluation 388

Monitoring Student Progress 388

What Is Progress Monitoring? 389

Characteristics of Progress Monitoring Measures 390

Progress Monitoring Measures for Reading 391

Progress Monitoring for Written Expression 392

Progress Monitoring for Math Computation 394

Implementing Progress Monitoring 395

Modifying Instruction Using START 399

Chapter Summary 399

Appendix A Psychoactive Drugs

References

Name Index

Subject Index

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