CART

(0) items

The Federalist

by ; ; ; ; ;
Edition:
2nd
ISBN13:

9780865972896

ISBN10:
0865972893
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
7/1/2001
Publisher(s):
Liberty Fund
List Price: $14.50

Rent Textbook

(Recommended)
 
Term
Due
Price
$5.08

Hurry!

Only one copy
in stock at this price.

Buy Used Textbook

In Stock Usually Ships in 24 Hours.
U9780865972896
$7.31

Buy New Textbook

In Stock Usually Ships in 24-48 Hours
N9780865972896
$14.14

eTextbook

Downloadable Offline Access
  • Apple Devices
  • Android Devices
  • Kindle Fire
  • Windows Devices
  • Mac Devices
Lifetime Access
$21.92
More New and Used
from Private Sellers
Starting at $4.97
See Prices

Questions About This Book?

Why should I rent this book?
Renting is easy, fast, and cheap! Renting from eCampus.com can save you hundreds of dollars compared to the cost of new or used books each semester. At the end of the semester, simply ship the book back to us with a free UPS shipping label! No need to worry about selling it back.
How do rental returns work?
Returning books is as easy as possible. As your rental due date approaches, we will email you several courtesy reminders. When you are ready to return, you can print a free UPS shipping label from our website at any time. Then, just return the book to your UPS driver or any staffed UPS location. You can even use the same box we shipped it in!
What version or edition is this?
This is the 2nd edition with a publication date of 7/1/2001.
What is included with this book?
  • The New copy of this book will include any supplemental materials advertised. Please check the title of the book to determine if it should include any CDs, lab manuals, study guides, etc.
  • The Used copy of this book is not guaranteed to inclue any supplemental materials. Typically, only the book itself is included.
  • The Rental copy of this book is not guaranteed to include any supplemental materials. You may receive a brand new copy, but typically, only the book itself.

Summary

The Federalist by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay constitutes a text central to the American political tradition. Written and published in newspapers in 1787 and 1788 to explain and promote ratification of the proposed Constitution for the United States, which were then bound by the Articles of Confederation, The Federalist remains of singular importance to students of liberty around the world. The Liberty Fund edition of Federalist includes a new introduction notes to The Federalist, a glossary, and the entirety of the Articles of Confederation, the Declaration of Independence, and the United States Constitution. Adjoining the text of the Constitution are cross-references linking provisions of the Constitution to the pertinent passages in The Federalist that address the specific term, phrase, section, or article within the Constitution.

Table of Contents

Editors' Introduction xvii
Reader's Guide to The Federalist lvii
Preface to the Gideon Edition lxxxv
THE FEDERALIST
Introduction
1(4)
Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force & Influence
5(4)
The same Subject continued
9(4)
The same Subject continued
13(4)
The same Subject continued
17(3)
Concerning Dangers from War between the States
20(6)
The subject continued, and Particular Causes Enumerated
26(6)
The effects of Internal War in producing Standing Armies, and other institutions unfriendly to liberty
32(5)
The Utility of the Union as a Safeguard against Domestic Faction and Insurrection
37(5)
The same Subject continued
42(7)
The Utility of the Union in respect to Commerce and a Navy
49(6)
The Utility of the Union in respect to Revenue
55(5)
The same Subject continued, with a view to Economy
60(2)
An Objection drawn from the Extent of Country, Answered
62(6)
Concerning the Defects of the Present Confederation, in Relation to the Principle of Legislation for the States in their Collective Capacities
68(7)
The same Subject continued, in relation to the same Principles
75(5)
The Subject continued, and Illustrated by Examples, to show the tendency of Federal Governments, rather to Anarchy among the Members, than Tyranny in the Head
80(4)
The Subject continued, with further Examples
84(6)
The Subject continued, with further Examples
90(5)
The Subject continued, with further Examples
95(4)
Further defects of the present Constitution
99(5)
The same subject continued, and concluded
104(8)
The necessity of a government, at least equally energetic with the one proposed
112(5)
The subject continued, with an answer to an objection concerning standing armies
117(5)
The subject continued, with the same view
122(4)
The subject continued, with the same view
126(6)
The subject continued, with the same view
132(4)
The same subject continued
136(4)
Concerning the militia
140(5)
Concerning taxation
145(5)
The same subject continued
150(4)
The same subject continued
154(4)
The same subject continued
158(4)
The same subject continued
162(5)
The same subject continued
167(5)
The same subject continued
172(7)
Concerning the difficulties which the convention must have experienced in the formation of a proper plan
179(7)
The subject continued, and the incoherence of the objections to the plan, exposed
186(7)
The conformity of the plan to republican principles: an objection in respect to the powers of the convention, examined
193(6)
The same objection further examined
199(8)
General view of the powers proposed to be vested in the union
207(8)
The same view continued
215(7)
The same view continued
222(8)
The same view continued and concluded
230(7)
A further discussion of the supposed danger from the powers of the union, to the state governments
237(5)
The subject of the last paper resumed; with an examination of the comparative means of influence of the federal and state governments
242(7)
The meaning of the maxim, which requires a separation of the departments of power, examined and ascertained
249(7)
The same subject continued, with a view to the means of giving efficacy in practice to that maxim
256(4)
The same subject continued, with the same view
260(4)
The same subject continued, with the same view
264(3)
The same subject continued, with the same view, and concluded
267(5)
Concerning the house of representatives, with a view to the qualifications of the electors and elected, and the time of service of the members
272(4)
The same subject continued, with a view of the term of service of the members
276(6)
The same subject continued, with a view to the ratio of representation
282(4)
The same subject continued, in relation to the total number of the body
286(5)
The subject continued, in relation to the same point
291(4)
The same subject continued, in relation to the supposed tendency of the plan of the convention to elevate the few above the many
295(5)
The same subject continued, in relation to the future augmentation of the members
300(5)
Concerning the regulation of elections
305(5)
The same subject continued
310(5)
The same subject continued, and concluded
315(4)
Concerning the constitution of the senate, with regard to the qualifications of the members; the manner of appointing them; the equality of representation; the number of the senators, and the duration of their appointments
319(6)
A further view of the constitution of the senate, in regard to the duration of the appointments of its members
325(7)
A further view of the constitution of the senate, in regard to the power of making treaties
332(5)
A further view of the constitution of the senate, in relation to its capacity, as a court for the trial of impeachments
337(5)
The same subject continued
342(5)
Concerning the constitution of the president: a gross attempt to misrepresent this part of the plan detected
347(4)
The view of the constitution of the president continued, in relation to the mode of appointment
351(4)
The same view continued, with a comparison between the president and the king of Great Britain, on the one hand, and the governor of New York, on the other
355(7)
The same view continued, in relation to the unity of the executive, and with an examination of the project of an executive council
362(7)
The same view continued, in regard to the duration of the office
369(5)
The same view continued, in regard to the re-eligibility of the president
374(5)
The same view continued, in relation to the provision concerning support, and the power of the negative
379(5)
The same view continued, in relation to the command of the national forces, and the power of pardoning
384(3)
The same view continued, in relation to the power of making treaties
387(4)
The same view continued, in relation to the appointment of the officers of the government
391(5)
The view of the constitution of the president concluded, with a further consideration of the power of appointment, and a concise examination of his remaining powers
396(5)
A view of the constitution of the judicial department in relation to the tenure of good behaviour
401(7)
A further view of the judicial department, in relation to the provisions for the support and responsibility of the judges
408(3)
A further view of the judicial department, in relation to the extent of its powers
411(6)
A further view of the judicial department, in relation to the distribution of its authority
417(9)
A further view of the judicial department, in reference to some miscellaneous questions
426(4)
A further view of the judicial department, in relation to the trial by jury
430(12)
Concerning several miscellaneous objections
442(10)
Conclusion
452(7)
Glossary 459(67)
Appendixes
1. The Declaration of Independence
495(5)
2. Articles of Confederation
500(10)
3. Virginia Resolution Proposing the Annapolis Convention
510(1)
4. Proceedings of the Annapolis Convention
511(5)
5. Virginia Resolution Providing Delegates to the Federal Convention of 1787
516(2)
6. Call by the Continental Congress for the Federal Convention of 1787
518(2)
7. Resolution of the Federal Convention Submitting the Constitution to the Continental Congress
520(2)
8. Washington's Letter of Transmittal to the President of the Continental Congress
522(2)
9. Resolution of the Continental Congress Submitting the Constitution to the Several States
524(1)
10. Letter of the Secretary of the Continental Congress Transmitting Copy of the Constitution to the Several Governors
525(1)
The Constitution of the United States (cross-referenced with The Federalist) and Amendments 526(27)
Index 553


Please wait while the item is added to your cart...