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Financial Accounting : The Impact on Decision Makers, the Alternative to Debits and Credits,9780324272666
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Financial Accounting : The Impact on Decision Makers, the Alternative to Debits and Credits

by
Edition:
4th
ISBN13:

9780324272666

ISBN10:
0324272669
Format:
Paperback
Pub. Date:
1/6/2004
Publisher(s):
South-Western College Pub
List Price: $204.33

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Summary

The fourth edition of Financial Accounting: The Impact on Decision Makers, An Alternative to Debits and Credits, 4e continues to focus on the user/decision maker perspective. Transactions, which as presented in a spreadsheet (accounting equation) format, are used to help students understand the impact on financial information. The authors use the financial statements from Winnebago Industries and Monaco Coach throughout the chapter and end of chapter material. Porter/Norton is unique in its use of these competing companies for comparative financial analysis and in end of chapter cases.

Table of Contents

PART I THE ACCOUNTING MODEL 1(214)
INTRODUCTION Getting Started in Business
2(10)
Winnebago Industries: The Need to Make Financial Decisions
3(1)
What Is Business?
4(1)
Forms of Organization
5(2)
Business Entities
6(1)
Nonbusiness Entities
7(1)
Organizations and Social Responsibility
7(1)
The Nature of Business Activity
7(2)
Financing Activities
7(1)
Investing Activities
8(1)
Operating Activities
8(1)
Starting the Study of Accounting
9(1)
Key Term Quiz
10(1)
Alternate Terms
11(1)
Questions
11(1)
Solutions to Key Terms Quiz
11(1)
CHAPTER 1 Accounting as a Form of Communication
12(44)
Focus on Financial Results: Winnebago Industries
13(1)
What Is Accounting?
14(1)
Users of Accounting Information and Their Needs
14(1)
Internal Users
14(1)
External Users
14(1)
Business Strategy: To Build or Not to Build?
15(1)
Financial Statements: How Accountants Communicate
16(5)
The Accounting Equation and the Balance Sheet
17(2)
The Income Statement
19(1)
The Statement of Retained Earnings
20(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are a Potential Stockholder
21(1)
Relationships Among Winnebago Industries' Financial Statements
21(1)
The Conceptual Framework: Foundation for Financial Statements
22(2)
Accounting as a Social Science
23(1)
Who Determines the Rules of the Game?
24(1)
The Accounting Profession
24(5)
Employment by Private Business
24(1)
Employment by Nonbusiness Entities
25(1)
Employment in Public Accounting
25(3)
Accountants in Education
28(1)
Accounting as a Career
28(1)
Introduction to Ethics in Accounting
28(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are a Student
29(3)
Identification
30(1)
Analysis
30(1)
Resolution
31(1)
Accountants and Ethical Judgments
31(1)
The Changing Face of the Accounting Profession
32(1)
A Final Note About Winnebago Industries
32(24)
CHAPTER 2 Financial Statements and the Annual Report
56(50)
Focus on Financial Results: Monaco Coach Corporation
57(1)
What External Decision Makers Want to Know About Financial Statements
58(1)
Why Does Accounting Information Need to Be Useful? Objectives of Financial Reporting
59(2)
The Primary Objective: Provide Information for Decision Making
59(1)
Secondary Objective: Reflect Prospective Cash Flows to the Enterprise
60(1)
Secondary Objective: Reflect the Enterprises Resources and Claims to Its Resources
60(1)
What Makes Accounting Information Useful? Qualitative Characteristics
61(1)
Understandability
61(1)
Relevance
61(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Stockholder
62(2)
Reliability
62(1)
Comparability and Consistency
62(2)
Materiality
64(1)
Conservatism
64(1)
Financial Reporting: An International Perspective
64(1)
The Classified Balance Sheet
65(5)
What Are the Parts of the Balance Sheet? Understanding the Operating Cycle
65(2)
Current Assets
67(1)
Noncurrent Assets
68(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions
69(1)
Current Liabilities
69(1)
Long-Term Liabilities
70(1)
Stockholders' Equity
70(1)
Using a Classified Balance Sheet
70(1)
Working Capital
70(1)
Current Ratio
71(1)
The Income Statement
71(4)
What Appears on the Income Statement?
71(1)
Ethics in Accounting
72(1)
Format of the Income Statement
72(2)
Using a Multiple-Step Income Statement
74(1)
The Statement of Retained Earnings
75(1)
The Statement of Cash Flows
75(2)
The Cash Flow Statement for Dixon Sporting Goods
75(2)
The Financial Statements for Monaco Coach Corporation
77(5)
Monaco Coach's Balance Sheet
77(2)
Monaco Coach's Income Statement
79(1)
Other Elements of an Annual Report
79(3)
Business Strategy: Focused on Growth
82(1)
Ratios for Decision Making
83(23)
CHAPTER 3 Processing Accounting Information
106(50)
Focus on Financial Results: General Mills
107(1)
What External Decision Makers Want To Know About How Accounting Information Is Processed
108(1)
Economic Events: The Basis for Recording Transactions
109(7)
External and Internal Events
109(1)
The Role of Source Documents in Recording Transactions
110(1)
Analyzing the Effects of Transactions on the Accounting Equation
110(4)
Balance Sheet and Income Statement for the Health Club
114(2)
Business Strategy: General Mills
116(1)
The Account: The Basic Unit for Recording Transactions
117(2)
Chart of Accounts
117(1)
The General Ledger
117(2)
Processing Accounting Information
119(4)
APPENDIX: Accounting Tools: The Double-Entry System
123(1)
The T Account
123(1)
Debits and Credits
123(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are a Student
124(4)
Debits and Credits for Revenues, Expenses, and Dividends
124(1)
Summary of the Rules for Increasing and Decreasing Accounts
125(1)
Normal Account Balances
125(1)
Debits Aren't Bad, and Credits Aren't Good
125(1)
Debits and Credits Applied to Transactions
125(1)
Transactions for Glengarry Health Club
126(2)
The Journal: The Firm's Chronological Record of Transactions
128(2)
The Trial Balance
130(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Manager
131(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Stockholder
132(24)
CHAPTER 4 Income Measurement and Accrual Accounting
156(57)
Focus on Financial Results: McDonald's
157(1)
What External Decision Makers Want to Know About Accrual Accounting
158(1)
Recognition and Measurement in Financial Statements
159(2)
Recognition
159(1)
Measurement
159(2)
Summary of Recognition and Measurement in Financial Statements
161(1)
The Accrual Basis of Accounting
161(2)
Comparing the Cash and Accrual Bases of Accounting
161(1)
What the Income Statement and the Statement of Cash Flows Reveal
162(1)
Business Strategy: Adding Customers to Restaurants
163(2)
Accrual Accounting and Time Periods
164(1)
The Revenue Recognition Principle
164(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Marketing Manager
165(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Stockholder
165(3)
Other Applications of the Revenue Recognition Principle
166(2)
Ethics in Accounting: Bristol-Myers Squibb 167
Expense Recognition and the Matching Principle
168(2)
Accrual Accounting and Adjustments
170(1)
Types of Adjustments
170(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Store Manager
171(3)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Banker
174(8)
Accruals and Deferrals
176(1)
Summary of Adjustments
177(1)
Comprehensive Example of Adjustments
178(1)
Adjustments at the End of January
178(2)
Income Statement and Balance Sheet for Duffy Transit
180(1)
Ethical Considerations for a Company on the Accrual Basis
181(1)
The Accounting Cycle
182(34)
The Use of a Work Sheet
182(1)
The Closing Process
182(1)
Interim Financial Statements
183(30)
Part I Integrative Problem
213(2)
PART II ACCOUNTING FOR ASSETS 215(200)
CHAPTER 5 Cash and Internal Control
216(34)
Focus on Financial Results
217(1)
What External Decision Makers Want to Know About Cash and Internal Control
218(1)
What Constitutes Cash?
219(1)
Cash Equivalents and the Statement of Cash Flows
219(1)
Control Over Cash
220(1)
Cash Management
220(1)
Business Strategy: Putting Cash to Use
221(4)
Reading a Bank Statement
221(2)
The Bank Reconciliation
223(2)
The Bank Reconciliation and the Need for Adjustments to the Records
225(1)
Establishing a Petty Cash Fund
225(1)
An Introduction to Internal Control
225(4)
The Report of Management: Showing Responsibility for Control
226(1)
The Control Environment
227(1)
The Accounting System
228(1)
Internal Control Procedures
228(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Chief Financial Officer
229(2)
Limitations on Internal Control
230(1)
Computerized Business Documents and Internal Control
231(19)
Control Over Cash Receipts
231(1)
The Role of Computerized Business Documents in Controlling Cash Disbursements
232(18)
CHAPTER 6 Investments and Receivables
250(46)
Focus on Financial Results: PepsiCo
250(2)
What External Decision Makers Want to Know About Short-Term Investments and Receivables
252(1)
Accounting for Investments
253(1)
Investments in Highly Liquid Financial Instruments
254(1)
Investing Idle Cash
254(1)
Accounting for an Investment in a Certificate of Deposit (CD),
254(1)
Investments in Stocks and Bonds
255(1)
Investments Without Significant Influence
256(5)
Investments in Held-to-Maturity Securities
256(1)
Investments in Trading Securities
257(3)
Investments in Available-for-Sale Securities
260(1)
Business Strategy: Adding Brands, Growing Sales, and Cutting Costs
261(2)
Summary of Accounting and Reporting Requirements
262(1)
The Controversy over Fair Value Accounting
262(1)
Accounts Receivable
263(2)
The Use of a Subsidiary Ledger
263(1)
The Valuation of Accounts Receivable
264(1)
Two Methods to Account for Bad Debts
264(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Credit Manager
265(2)
Write-Offs of Uncollectible Accounts with the Allowance Method
266(1)
Two Approaches to the Allowance Method of Accounting for Bad Debts
266(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Owner
267(3)
Analyzing the Accounts Receivable Rate of Collection
270(1)
Notes Receivable
270(3)
Important Terms Connected with Promissory Notes
270(1)
Interest-Bearing Notes
271(1)
Non-Interest-Bearing Notes
272(1)
Accelerating the Inflow of Cash from Sales
273(2)
Credit Card Sales
273(2)
Discounting Notes Receivable
275(1)
How Liquid Assets Affect the Cash Flows Statement
275(1)
Ratios for Decision Making: Reporting and Analyzing Financial Statement Information Related to a Company's Accounts Receivable
276(20)
CHAPTER 7 Inventories and Cost of Goods Sold
296(70)
Focus on Financial Results: Circuit City
297(1)
What External Decision Makers Want to Know About
Inventory
298(1)
The Nature of Inventory
299(2)
The Income Statement for a Merchandiser
301(1)
Net Sales of Merchandise
301(1)
Sales Returns and Allowances
301(1)
Credit Terms and Sales Discounts
302(1)
The Cost of Goods Sold
302(3)
The Cost of Goods Sold Model
303(1)
Inventory Systems: Perpetual and Periodic
304(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Entrepreneur
305(2)
Beginning and Ending Inventories in a Periodic System
306(1)
The Cost of Goods Purchased
306(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the President
307(3)
Inventory Valuation and the Measurement of Income
310(1)
Inventory Costs: What Should Be Included?
310(1)
Inventory Costing Methods with a Periodic System
311(1)
Business Strategy: Capitalizing on the Digital Age
311(4)
Specific Identification Method
312(1)
Weighted Average Cost Method
313(1)
First-In, First-Out Method (FIFO)
314(1)
Last-In, First-Out Method (LIFO)
314(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Controller
315(1)
Selecting an Inventory Costing Method
315(4)
Costing Methods and Cash Flow
316(1)
LIFO Liquidation
317(1)
The LIFO Reserve: Estimating LIFO's Effect on Income and on Taxes Paid for Winnebago Industries
317(1)
Costing Methods and Inventory Profits
318(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are a Student
319(6)
Changing Inventory Methods
319(1)
Inventory Valuation in Other Countries
320(1)
Inventory Errors
320(3)
Valuing Inventory at Lower of Cost or Market
323(1)
Why Replacement Cost Is Used as a Measure of Market
323(1)
Conservism Is the Basis for the Lower-of-Cost-or-Market Rule
324(1)
Application of the LCM Rule
325(1)
Methods for Estimating Inventory Value
325(3)
Gross Profit Method
326(1)
Retail Inventory Method
327(1)
Analyzing the Management of Inventory Turnover
328(1)
How Inventories Affect the Cash Flows Statement
329(1)
Ratios for Decision Making
330(6)
APPENDIX: Accounting Tools: Inventory Costing Methods with the Use of a Perpetual Inventory System
336(30)
CHAPTER 8 Operating Assets: Property, Plant, and Equipment, Natural Resources, and Intangibles
366(46)
Focus on Financial Results: Walt Disney Company
367(1)
What External Decision Makers Want to Know About Operating Assets
368(1)
Operating Assets: Property, Plant, and Equipment
369(1)
Balance Sheet Presentation
369(1)
Acquisition of Property, Plant, and Equipment
369(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are an Attorney
370(9)
Challenges to Internal Decision Makers: Use, Depreciation, and Disposal of Property, Plant, and Equipment
372(4)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Sole Owner
376(3)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Owner
379(2)
Environmental Aspects of Operating Assets
379(1)
Disposal of Property, Plant, and Equipment
379(2)
Operating Assets: Natural Resources
381(1)
Balance Sheet Presentation
381(1)
Depletion of Natural Resources
381(1)
Operating Assets: Intangible Assets
382(4)
Balance Sheet Presentation
383(1)
Acquisition Cost of Intangible Assets
384(2)
Business Strategy: Valuing Intangible Assets
386(2)
Amortization of Intangibles
386(2)
Ethics in Accounting: AOL Time Warner
388(1)
How Long-Term Assets Affect the Statement of Cash Flows
388(2)
Analyzing Long-Term Assets for Average Life and Asset Turnover
390(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Student Intern
391(2)
Ratios for Decision Making
393(19)
Part II Integrative Problem
412(3)
PAT III ACCOUNTING FOR LIABILITIES AND OWNERS' EQUITY 415(176)
CHAPTER 9 Current Liabilities, Contingencies, and the Time Value of Money
416(68)
Focus on Financial Results: J.C. Penney
417(1)
What External Decision Makers Want to Know About Current Liabilities
418(1)
Current Liabilities
419(2)
Ethics in Accounting: Rent-Way
421(4)
Accounts Payable
422(1)
Notes Payable
422(1)
Current Maturities of Long-Term Debt
423(1)
Taxes Payable
424(1)
Other Accrued Liabilities
424(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are a Student
425(1)
Reading the Statement of Cash Flows for Changes in Current Liabilities
425(1)
Contingent Liabilities
426(2)
Contingent Liabilities That Are Recorded
427(1)
Business Strategy: Effectively Expanding into Different Market Segments
428(3)
Contingent Liabilities That Are Disclosed
430(1)
Contingent Liabilities versus Contingent Assets
430(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the CEO
431(2)
Time Value of Money Concepts
433(2)
Simple Interest
434(1)
Compound Interest
434(1)
Interest Compounding
434(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions You Invest Some Unexpected Cash
435(9)
Future Value of a Single Amount
435(3)
Present Value of a Single Amount
438(1)
Future Value of an Annuity
439(2)
Present Value of an Annuity
441(1)
Solving for Unknowns
442(2)
Ratios for Decision Making
444(10)
APPENDIX A: Accounting Tools: Payroll Accounting
454(3)
APPENDIX B: Accounting Tools: Using Excel for Problems Involving Interest Calculations
457(27)
CHAPTER 10 Long-Term Liabilities
484(52)
Focus on Financial Results: Coca-Cola
485(1)
What External Decision Makers Want to Know About Long-Term Liabilities
486(1)
Balance Sheet Presentation
487(1)
Ethics in Accounting. Enron Corporation
487(2)
Bonds Payable
489(3)
Characteristics of Bonds
489(1)
Issuance of Bonds
490(1)
Factors Affecting Bond Price
490(2)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Rate the Bonds
492(8)
Premium or Discount on Bonds
493(1)
Bond Amortization
494(4)
Redemption of Bonds
498(2)
Business Strategy: Product Strategy to Meet Competition
500(1)
Liability for Leases
500(1)
Leases
500(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: Should You Lease or Buy?
501(4)
How Long-Term Liabilities Affect the Statement of Cash Flows
505(2)
Analyzing Debt to Assess a Firm's Ability to Pay Its Liabilities
507(1)
Ratios for Decision Making
508(4)
Accounting Tools: Other Liabilities
512(24)
CHAPTER 11 Stockholders' Equity
536(53)
Focus on Financial Results: Southwest Airlines
537(1)
What External Decision Makers Want To Know About Stockholders' Equity
538(1)
An Overview of Stockholders' Equity
539(1)
Equity as a Source of Financing
539(1)
Accounting far Your Decisions: You Are the Investor
539(6)
Stockholders' Equity on the Balance Sheet
541(1)
How Income and Dividends Affect Retained Earnings
541(1)
Identifying the Components of the Stockholders' Equity Section of the Balance Sheet
541(4)
Business Strategy: Southwest's Culture and Compensation
545(1)
What Is Preferred Stock?
545(1)
Issuance of Stock
546(1)
Stock Issued for Cash
546(1)
Stock Issued for Noncash Consideration
547(1)
What Is Treasury Stock?
547(2)
Retirement of Stock
549(1)
Dividends: Distribution of Income to Shareholders
549(5)
Cash Dividends
549(1)
Cash Dividends for Preferred and Common Stock
550(1)
Stock Dividends
551(2)
Stock Splits
553(1)
Statement of Stockholders' Equity
554(1)
What Is Comprehensive Income?
555(1)
Ethics in Accounting: Boston Chicken
556(1)
What Analyzing Owners' Equity Reveals About a Firm's Value
557(2)
Book Value per Share
557(1)
Calculating Book Value When Preferred Stock Is Present
557(2)
Market Value per Share
559(1)
How Changes in Stockholders' Equity Affect the Statement of Cash Flows
559(2)
Ratios for Decision Making
561(5)
APPENIDX: Accounting Tools: Unincorporated Businesses
566(23)
Part III Integrative Problem
589(2)
PART IV ADDITIONAL TOPICS IN FINANCIAL REPORTING 591(130)
CHAPTER 12 The Statement of Cash Flows
592(62)
Focus of Financial Results: IBM
593(1)
What External Decision Makers Want to Know About the Statement of Cash Flows
594(1)
Cash Flows and Accrual Accounting
595(1)
Purpose of the Statement of Cash Flows
596(1)
An Example
596(1)
Reporting Requirements for a Statement of Cash Flows
597(4)
The Definition of Cash: Cash and Cash Equivalents
598(1)
Classification of Cash Flows
599(2)
Business Strategy: Investing in the Future
601(5)
Two Methods of Reporting Cash Flow from Operating Activities
602(3)
Noncash Investing and Financing Activities
605(1)
How the Statement of Cash Flows Is Put Together
606(6)
The Accounting Equation and the Statement of Cash Flows
606(2)
Preparing the Statement of Cash Flows: Direct Method
608(4)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are an Entrepreneur
612(4)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Decide for Your Investment Club
616(4)
An Approach to Preparing the Statement of Cash Flows: Indirect Method
617(2)
Comparison of the Indirect and Direct Methods
619(1)
The Use of Cash Flow Information
620(2)
Creditors and Cash Flow Adequacy
620(1)
Stockholders and Cash Flow per Share
621(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Banker
622(1)
Ratios for Decision Making
622(4)
APPENDIX: Accounting Tools: A Work-Sheet Approach to the Statement of Cash Flows
626(28)
CHAPTER 13 Financial Statement Analysis
654(64)
Focus on Financial Results: Wm. Wrigley Jr. Company
655(1)
Precautions in Statement Analysis
656(1)
Watch for Alternative Accounting Principles
656(1)
Take Care When Making Comparisons
656(1)
Understand the Possible Effects of Inflation
657(1)
Business Strategy: Focus on Core Values
657(1)
Analysis of Comparative and Common-Size Statements
658(8)
Horizontal Analysis
658(3)
Vertical Analysis
661(5)
Liquidity Analysis and the Management of Working Capital
666(4)
Working Capital
666(1)
Current Ratio
666(1)
Acid-Test Ratio
667(1)
Cash Flow from Operations to Current Liabilities
668(1)
Accounts Receivable Analysis
669(1)
Inventory Analysis
669(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Examine Your Business's Trends
670(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the Analyst
670(1)
Cash Operating Cycle
671(1)
Solvency Analysis
671(3)
Debt-to-Equity Ratio
672(1)
Times Interest Earned
672(1)
Debt Service Coverage
673(1)
Cash Flow from Operations to Capital Expenditures Ratio
673(1)
Profitability Analysis
674(5)
Rate of Return on Assets
674(1)
Components of Return on Assets
675(1)
Return on Common Stockholders' Equity
676(1)
Return on Assets, Return on Equity, and Leverage
677(1)
Earnings per Share
678(1)
Price/Earnings Ratio
678(1)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Are the CEO
679(3)
Dividend Ratios
679(1)
Summary of Selected Financial Ratios
680(2)
Accounting for Your Decisions: You Decide on a Stock Purchase
682(6)
APPENDIX: Accounting Tools: Reporting and Analyzing Other Income Statement Items
688(30)
Part IV Integrative Problem
718(3)
APPENDIX A: WINNEBAGO INDUSTRIES 2002 ANNUAL REPORT 721(44)
APPENDIX B: MONACO COACH CORPORATION 2002 ANNUAL REPORT 765
GLOSSARY G-1
COMPANY INDEX I-1
SUBJECT INDEX I-3


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